Stuff Matters

Exploring the Marvelous Materials That Shape Our Man-Made World

Author: Mark Miodownik

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0544236041

Category: History

Page: 252

View: 7016

A world-leading materials scientist presents an engrossing collection of stories that explain the science and history of materials, from the plastic in our appliances to the elastic in our underpants, revealing the miracles of engineering that seep into our everyday lives. 25,000 first printing.
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Stuff Matters

Exploring the Marvelous Materials That Shape Our Man-Made World

Author: Mark Miodownik

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0544237048

Category: Science

Page: 256

View: 5515

New York Times Bestseller • New York Times Notable Book 2014 • Winner of the Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books “A thrilling account of the modern material world.” —Wall Street Journal "Miodownik, a materials scientist, explains the history and science behind things such as paper, glass, chocolate, and concrete with an infectious enthusiasm." —Scientific American Why is glass see-through? What makes elastic stretchy? Why does any material look and behave the way it does? These are the sorts of questions that renowned materials scientist Mark Miodownik constantly asks himself. Miodownik studies objects as ordinary as an envelope and as unexpected as concrete cloth, uncovering the fascinating secrets that hold together our physical world. In Stuff Matters, Miodownik explores the materials he encounters in a typical morning, from the steel in his razor to the foam in his sneakers. Full of enthralling tales of the miracles of engineering that permeate our lives, Stuff Matters will make you see stuff in a whole new way. "Stuff Matters is about hidden wonders, the astonishing properties of materials we think boring, banal, and unworthy of attention...It's possible this science and these stories have been told elsewhere, but like the best chocolatiers, Miodownik gets the blend right." —New York Times Book Review
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Stuff Matters

Exploring the Marvelous Materials That Shape Our Man-Made World

Author: Mark Miodownik

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780544483941

Category: Science

Page: 272

View: 8132

An eye-opening adventure deep inside the everyday materials that surround us, packed with surprising stories and fascinating science
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Proof

The Science of Booze

Author: Adam Rogers

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0547897960

Category: Cooking

Page: 264

View: 1874

A spirited, history-rich narrative on the art and science of alcohol discusses everything from fermentation and distillation to traditions and the effects of alcohol on the body and brain. 25,000 first printing.
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Stuff

The Materials the World is Made of

Author: Ivan Amato

Publisher: Harpercollins

ISBN: N.A

Category: Science

Page: 294

View: 2684

Provides a history of how scientists have taken raw materials and turned them into new and usable "stuff," and includes interviews with experts in the field
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Made to Measure

New Materials for the 21st Century

Author: Philip Ball

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691009759

Category: Science

Page: 458

View: 759

This text describes how scientists are inventing thousands of materials, ranging from synthetic skin, blood and bone, to substances that repair themselves and adapt to their environment. It outlines how newly-invented materials will transform our lives in the 21st century.
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Materials for Architects and Builders

Author: Arthur Lyons

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317667360

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 496

View: 3197

Materials for Architects and Builders provides a clear and concise introduction to the broad range of materials used within the construction industry and covers the essential details of their manufacture, key physical properties, specification and uses. Understanding the basics of materials is a crucial part of undergraduate and diploma construction or architecture-related courses, and this established textbook helps the reader to do just that with the help of colour photographs and clear diagrams throughout. This new edition has been completely revised and updated to include the latest developments in materials research, new images, appropriate technologies and relevant legislation. The ecological effects of building construction and lifetime use remain an important focus, and this new edition includes a wide range of energy saving building components.
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Introduction to Materials Chemistry

Author: Harry R. Allcock

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118210980

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 452

View: 5069

Introduction to Materials Chemistry will appeal to advanced undergraduates and graduate students in chemistry, materials science,and chemical engineering by leading them stepwise from the elementary chemistry on which materials science depends, through a discussion of the different classes of materials, and ending with a description of how materials are used in devices and general technology.
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The Substance of Civilization

Materials and Human History from the Stone Age to the Age of Silicon

Author: Stephen L. Sass

Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.

ISBN: 1628721731

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 328

View: 7291

This fascinating book “is a good starting place to develop an appreciation for the history and nature of materials science” (Scientific American). The story of human civilization can be read most deeply in the materials we have found, created, used, and abused. They have dictated how we build, eat, communicate, wage war, create art, travel, and worship. Some, such as stone, iron, and bronze, lend their names to the ages. Others, such as gold, silver, and diamond, contributed to the rise and fall of empires. How would history have unfolded without glass, paper, steel, cement, or gunpowder? The impulse to master our material world has guided the course of history since the dawn of time. In The Substance of Civilization, Sass demonstrates how substances and civilizations have evolved together. Moving from the Stone Age to the Age of Silicon, from the days of prehistoric survival to the cutting edge of nanotechnology, this fascinating and accessible book connects the worlds of minerals and molecules to the sweep of human history, and predicts what materials will dominate the century ahead. “Sass, a professor at Cornell University and a writer of both affability and precision, bridges the divide between history and science . . . and provides diverse and illuminating examples with unflagging and infectious enthusiasm.” —Booklist “Gobs of wonderful trivia.” —Kirkus Reviews
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Concrete Planet

The Strange and Fascinating Story of the World's Most Common Man-Made Material

Author: Robert Courland

Publisher: Prometheus Books

ISBN: 1616144823

Category: Science

Page: 396

View: 8488

Concrete: We use it for our buildings, bridges, dams, and roads. We walk on it, drive on it, and many of us live and work within its walls. But very few of us know what it is. We take for granted this ubiquitous substance, which both literally and figuratively comprises much of modern civilization’s constructed environment; yet the story of its creation and development features a cast of fascinating characters and remarkable historical episodes. This book delves into this history, opening readers’ eyes at every turn. In a lively narrative peppered with intriguing details, author Robert Corland describes how some of the most famous personalities of history became involved in the development and use of concrete—including King Herod the Great of Judea, the Roman emperor Hadrian, Thomas Edison (who once owned the largest concrete cement plant in the world), and architect Frank Lloyd Wright. Courland points to recent archaeological evidence suggesting that the discovery of concrete directly led to the Neolithic Revolution and the rise of the earliest civilizations. Much later, the Romans reached extraordinarily high standards for concrete production, showcasing their achievement in iconic buildings like the Coliseum and the Pantheon. Amazingly, with the fall of the Roman Empire, the secrets of concrete manufacturing were lost for over a millennium. The author explains that when concrete was rediscovered in the late eighteenth century it was initially viewed as an interesting novelty or, at best, a specialized building material suitable only for a narrow range of applications. It was only toward the end of the nineteenth century that the use of concrete exploded. During this rapid expansion, industry lobbyists tried to disguise the fact that modern concrete had certain defects and critical shortcomings. It is now recognized that modern concrete, unlike its Roman predecessor, gradually disintegrates with age. Compounding this problem is another distressing fact: the manufacture of concrete cement is a major contributor to global warming. Concrete Planet is filled with incredible stories, fascinating characters, surprising facts, and an array of intriguing insights into the building material that forms the basis of the infrastructure on which we depend. From the Hardcover edition.
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Rust

The Longest War

Author: Jonathan Waldman

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1451691599

Category: Science

Page: 304

View: 5175

An environmental journalist traces the historical war against rust, revealing how rust-related damage costs more than all other natural disasters combined and how it is combated by industrial workers, the government, universities and everyday people.
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Periodic Tales

A Cultural History of the Elements, from Arsenic to Zinc

Author: Hugh Aldersey-Williams

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 006207881X

Category: Science

Page: 448

View: 5203

In the spirit of A Short History of Nearly Everything comes Periodic Tales. Award-winning science writer Hugh Andersey-Williams offers readers a captivating look at the elements—and the amazing, little-known stories behind their discoveries. Periodic Tales is an energetic and wide-ranging book of innovations and innovators, of superstition and science and the myriad ways the chemical elements are woven into our culture, history, and language. It will delight readers of Genome, Einstein’s Dreams, Longitude, and The Age of Wonder.
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Napoleon's Buttons

17 Molecules that Changed History

Author: Penny Le Couteur,Jay Burreson

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781585423316

Category: Science

Page: 375

View: 867

Examines the roles that the molecular properties of such items as the birth control pill, caffeine, and the buttons on the uniforms of Napoleon's army have played in the course of history.
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The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons

The History of the Human Brain as Revealed by True Stories of Trauma, Madness, and Recovery

Author: Sam Kean

Publisher: Little, Brown

ISBN: 031624225X

Category: Science

Page: 416

View: 5553

The author of the bestseller The Disappearing Spoon reveals the secret inner workings of the brain through strange but true stories. Early studies of the human brain used a simple method: wait for misfortune to strike -- strokes, seizures, infectious diseases, horrendous accidents -- and see how victims coped. In many cases their survival was miraculous, if puzzling. Observers were amazed by the transformations that took place when different parts of the brain were destroyed, altering victims' personalities. Parents suddenly couldn't recognize their own children. Pillars of the community became pathological liars. Some people couldn't speak but could still sing. In The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons, Sam Kean travels through time with stories of neurological curiosities: phantom limbs, Siamese twin brains, viruses that eat patients' memories, blind people who see through their tongues. He weaves these narratives together with prose that makes the pages fly by, to create a story of discovery that reaches back to the 1500s and the high-profile jousting accident that inspired this book's title.* With the lucid, masterful explanations and razor-sharp wit his fans have come to expect, Kean explores the brain's secret passageways and recounts the forgotten tales of the ordinary people whose struggles, resilience, and deep humanity made neuroscience possible. *"The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons" refers to the case of French king Henri II, who in 1559 was lanced through the skull during a joust, resulting in one of the most significant cases in neuroscience history. For hundreds of years scientists have gained important lessons from traumatic accidents and illnesses, and such misfortunes still represent their greatest resource for discovery.
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Uranium

War, Energy, and the Rock That Shaped the World

Author: Tom Zoellner

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101024526

Category: Science

Page: 368

View: 3904

The fascinating story of the most powerful source of energy the earth can yield Uranium is a common element in the earth's crust and the only naturally occurring mineral with the power to end all life on the planet. After World War II, it reshaped the global order-whoever could master uranium could master the world. Marie Curie gave us hope that uranium would be a miracle panacea, but the Manhattan Project gave us reason to believe that civilization would end with apocalypse. Slave labor camps in Africa and Eastern Europe were built around mine shafts and America would knowingly send more than six hundred uranium miners to their graves in the name of national security. Fortunes have been made from this yellow dirt; massive energy grids have been run from it. Fear of it panicked the American people into supporting a questionable war with Iraq and its specter threatens to create another conflict in Iran. Now, some are hoping it can help avoid a global warming catastrophe. In Uranium, Tom Zoellner takes readers around the globe in this intriguing look at the mineral that can sustain life or destroy it.
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The Joy of X

A Guided Tour of Math, from One to Infinity

Author: Steven Henry Strogatz

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0547517653

Category: MATHEMATICS

Page: 316

View: 674

A comprehensive tour of leading mathematical ideas by an award-winning professor and columnist for the New York Times Opinionator series demonstrates how math intersects with philosophy, science and other aspects of everyday life. By the author of The Calculus of Friendship. 50,000 first printing.
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The Clockwork Universe

saac Newto, Royal Society, and the Birth of the Modern WorldI

Author: Edward Dolnick

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0062042262

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 4223

New York Times bestselling author Edward Dolnick brings to light the true story of one of the most pivotal moments in modern intellectual history—when a group of strange, tormented geniuses invented science as we know it, and remade our understanding of the world. Dolnick’s earth-changing story of Isaac Newton, the Royal Society, and the birth of modern science is at once an entertaining romp through the annals of academic history, in the vein of Bill Bryson’s A Short History of Nearly Everything, and a captivating exploration of a defining time for scientific progress, in the tradition of Richard Holmes’ The Age of Wonder.
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What the Future Looks Like

Scientists Predict the Next Great Discoveries—and Reveal How Today's Breakthroughs Are Already Shaping Our World

Author: Jim Al-Khalili

Publisher: The Experiment

ISBN: 1615194711

Category: Science

Page: 240

View: 7605

Science fact, not science fiction, on the cutting–edge developments that are already changing the course of our future Every day, scientists conduct pioneering experiments with the potential to transform how we live. Yet it isn’t every day you hear from the scientists themselves! Now, award–winning author Jim Al–Khalili and his team of top-notch experts explain how today’s earthshaking discoveries will shape our world tomorrow—and beyond. Pull back the curtain on: genomics robotics AI the “Internet of Things” synthetic biology transhumanism interstellar travel colonization of the solar system teleportation and much more And find insight into big–picture questions such as: Will we find a cure to all diseases? The answer to climate change? And will bionics one day turn us into superheroes? The scientists in these pages are interested only in the truth—reality–based and speculation–free. The future they conjure is by turns tantalizing and sobering: There’s plenty to look forward to, but also plenty to dread. And undoubtedly the best way to for us to face tomorrow’s greatest challenges is to learn what the future looks like—today.
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Materials: A Very Short Introduction

Author: Christopher Hall

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191653101

Category: Science

Page: 144

View: 7819

The study of materials is a major field of research that supports and drives innovation in technology. Using modern scientific techniques, materials scientists and engineers explore and manipulate materials, and create new ones with remarkable strength and extraordinary optical and electrical properties. In this Very Short Introduction, Christopher Hall looks at a wide range of materials, from steel, wood, and rubber, to gold, silicon, and graphene, describing how materials are used, how their properties arise from their internal structure, and how useful and novel things are made from them. He concludes by looking at how the global scale of materials consumption now threatens the goal of sustainability. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.
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Brilliant

The Evolution of Artificial Light

Author: Jane Brox

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0547487150

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 2298

Brilliant, reminiscent of Lewis Hyde’s The Gift in its reach and of Timothy Egan’s The Worst Hard Time in its haunting evocation of human lives, offers a sweeping view of a surprisingly revealing aspect of human history—from the stone lamps of the Pleistocene to the LEDs embedded in fabrics of the future. Brox plumbs the class implications of light—who had it, who didn’t—through the many centuries when crude lamps and tallow candles constricted waking hours. She convincingly portrays the hell-bent pursuit of whale oil as the first time the human desire for light thrust us toward an environmental tipping point. Only decades later, gas street lights opened up the evening hours to leisure, which changed the ways we live and sleep and the world’s ecosystems. Edison’s “tiny strip of paper that a breath would blow away” produced a light that seemed to its users all but divorced from human effort or cost. And yet, as Brox’s informative and hair-raising portrait of our current grid system shows, the cost is ever with us. Brilliant is infused with human voices, startling insights, and—only a few years before it becomes illegal to sell most incandescent light bulbs in the United States—timely questions about how our future lives will be shaped by light.
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