States Against Migrants

Deportation in Germany and the United States

Author: Antje Ellermann

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521515688

Category: Political Science

Page: 199

View: 8972

In this comparative study of the contemporary politics of deportation in Germany and the United States, Antje Ellermann analyzes the capacity of the liberal democratic state to control individuals within its borders. The book grapples with the question of why, in the 1990s, Germany responded to vociferous public demands for stricter immigration control by passing and implementing far-reaching policy reforms, while the United States failed to effectively respond to a comparable public mandate. Drawing on extensive field interviews, Ellermann finds that these crossnational differences reflect institutionally determined variations in socially coercive state capacity. By tracing the politics of deportation across the evolution of the policy cycle, beginning with anti-immigrant populist backlash and ending in the expulsion of migrants by deportation bureaucrats, Ellermann is also able to show that the conditions underlying state capacity systematically vary across policy stages. Whereas the ability to make socially coercive law is contingent on strong institutional linkages between the public and legislators, the capacity for implementation depends on the political insulation of bureaucrats.
Release

States Against Migrants

Deportation in Germany and the United States

Author: Antje Ellermann

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521515688

Category: Political Science

Page: 199

View: 2685

In this comparative study of the contemporary politics of deportation in Germany and the United States, Antje Ellermann analyzes the capacity of the liberal democratic state to control individuals within its borders. The book grapples with the question of why, in the 1990s, Germany responded to vociferous public demands for stricter immigration control by passing and implementing far-reaching policy reforms, while the United States failed to effectively respond to a comparable public mandate. Drawing on extensive field interviews, Ellermann finds that these crossnational differences reflect institutionally determined variations in socially coercive state capacity. By tracing the politics of deportation across the evolution of the policy cycle, beginning with anti-immigrant populist backlash and ending in the expulsion of migrants by deportation bureaucrats, Ellermann is also able to show that the conditions underlying state capacity systematically vary across policy stages. Whereas the ability to make socially coercive law is contingent on strong institutional linkages between the public and legislators, the capacity for implementation depends on the political insulation of bureaucrats.
Release

Reform Without Justice

Latino Migrant Politics and the Homeland Security State

Author: Alfonso Gonzales

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199973393

Category: Political Science

Page: 220

View: 2509

Ten years after the war on terror, the deportation of millions, and the ostensive rise of Latino political power, Reform Without Justice provides an analysis of both Latino migrant activism and state migration control.
Release

Immigrants Against the State

Yiddish and Italian Anarchism in America

Author: Kenyon Zimmer

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780252080920

Category: Political Science

Page: 312

View: 2317

From the 1880s through the 1940s, tens of thousands of first- and second-generation immigrants embraced the anarchist cause after arriving on American shores. Kenyon Zimmer explores why these migrants turned to anarchism, and how their adoption of its ideology shaped their identities, experiences, and actions. Zimmer focuses on Italians and Eastern European Jews in San Francisco, New York City, and Paterson, New Jersey. Tracing the movement's changing fortunes from the pre–World War I era through the Spanish Civil War, Zimmer argues that anarchists, opposed to both American and Old World nationalism, severed all attachments to their nations of origin but also resisted assimilation into their host society. Their radical cosmopolitan outlook and identity instead embraced diversity and extended solidarity across national, ethnic, and racial divides. Though ultimately unable to withstand the onslaught of Americanism and other nationalisms, the anarchist movement nonetheless provided a shining example of a transnational collective identity delinked from the nation-state and racial hierarchies.
Release

Go Back to Where You Came From

The Backlash Against Immigration and the Fate of Western Democracy

Author: Polakow-Suransky

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 1787380416

Category: Political Science

Page: N.A

View: 5323

From Europe to the United States and beyond, opportunistic politicians have exploited economic crisis, terrorist attacks and an influx of refugees to bring hateful and reactionary views from the margins of political discourse into the corridors of power. This climate has already helped propel Donald Trump to the White House, pushed Britain out of the European Union, and put Marine Le Pen within striking distance of the French presidency. Sasha Polakow-Suransky’s on-the-ground reportage and interviews with the rising stars of the new right tell the story of how we got here, tracing the global rise of anti-immigration politics and the ruthlessly effective rebranding of Europe’s new far right as defenders of Western liberal values. Go Back to Where You Came From is an indispensable account of why xenophobia went mainstream in countries known historically as defenders of human rights and models of tolerance.
Release

The Strange Death of Europe

Immigration, Identity, Islam

Author: Douglas Murray

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472942221

Category: Political Science

Page: 352

View: 548

The Sunday Times number one bestseller The Strange Death of Europe is a highly personal account of a continent and culture caught in the act of suicide. Declining birth-rates, mass immigration and cultivated self-distrust and self-hatred have come together to make Europeans unable to argue for themselves and incapable of resisting their own comprehensive change as a society. This book is not only an analysis of demographic and political realities, but also an eyewitness account of a continent in self-destruct mode. It includes reporting from across the entire continent, from the places where migrants land to the places they end up, from the people who appear to welcome them in to the places which cannot accept them. Told from this first-hand perspective, and backed with impressive research and evidence, the book addresses the disappointing failure of multiculturalism, Angela Merkel's U-turn on migration, the lack of repatriation and the Western fixation on guilt. Murray travels to Berlin, Paris, Scandinavia, Lampedusa and Greece to uncover the malaise at the very heart of the European culture, and to hear the stories of those who have arrived in Europe from far away. In each chapter he also takes a step back to look at the bigger issues which lie behind a continent's death-wish, answering the question of why anyone, let alone an entire civilisation, would do this to themselves? He ends with two visions of Europe – one hopeful, one pessimistic – which paint a picture of Europe in crisis and offer a choice as to what, if anything, we can do next.
Release

Weapons of Mass Migration

Forced Displacement, Coercion, and Foreign Policy

Author: Kelly M. Greenhill

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801457424

Category: Political Science

Page: 360

View: 4311

At first glance, the U.S. decision to escalate the war in Vietnam in the mid-1960s, China's position on North Korea's nuclear program in the late 1990s and early 2000s, and the EU resolution to lift what remained of the arms embargo against Libya in the mid-2000s would appear to share little in common. Yet each of these seemingly unconnected and far-reaching foreign policy decisions resulted at least in part from the exercise of a unique kind of coercion, one predicated on the intentional creation, manipulation, and exploitation of real or threatened mass population movements. In Weapons of Mass Migration, Kelly M. Greenhill offers the first systematic examination of this widely deployed but largely unrecognized instrument of state influence. She shows both how often this unorthodox brand of coercion has been attempted (more than fifty times in the last half century) and how successful it has been (well over half the time). She also tackles the questions of who employs this policy tool, to what ends, and how and why it ever works. Coercers aim to affect target states' behavior by exploiting the existence of competing political interests and groups, Greenhill argues, and by manipulating the costs or risks imposed on target state populations. This "coercion by punishment" strategy can be effected in two ways: the first relies on straightforward threats to overwhelm a target's capacity to accommodate a refugee or migrant influx; the second, on a kind of norms-enhanced political blackmail that exploits the existence of legal and normative commitments to those fleeing violence, persecution, or privation. The theory is further illustrated and tested in a variety of case studies from Europe, East Asia, and North America. To help potential targets better respond to-and protect themselves against-this kind of unconventional predation, Weapons of Mass Migration also offers practicable policy recommendations for scholars, government officials, and anyone concerned about the true victims of this kind of coercion-the displaced themselves.
Release

Key Concepts in Migration

Author: David Bartram,Maritsa Poros,Pierre Monforte

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 147390546X

Category: Social Science

Page: 184

View: 7991

"This very useful and authoritative compendium explicates thirty-eight concepts central to analysis of international migration. It is accessible to undergraduate students and even can enrich graduate courses. It nicely complements books like The Age of Migration or Exceptional People. Concision is a virtue!" - Mark J. Miller, University of Delaware "An essential introduction to migration that is international in scope and rigorous in its attention to the scholars, nuances and debates in the field." - Maggie O'Neill, Durham University "Demonstrates that the study of international migration has really come of age. From acculturation to undocumented immigration, the authors consider more than three dozen concepts at the heart of migration studies. Clearly written in a highly readable style, the book is a valuable resource for students and scholars alike." - Nancy Foner, City University of New York This book provides lucid and intuitive explanations of the most important migration concepts as used in classrooms, among policymakers, and in popular and academic discourse. Arguing that there is a clear need for a better public understanding of migration, it sets out to clarify the field by exploring relevant concepts in a direct and engaging way. Each concept: Includes an easy to understand definition Provides real-world examples Gives suggestions for further reading Is carefully cross-referenced to other related concepts It is an ideal resource for undergraduate and post-graduate students studying migration in sociology, politics, development and throughout the social sciences, as well as scholars in the field and practitioners in governmental and non-governmental organizations.
Release

Hidden Lives and Human Rights in the United States: Understanding the Controversies and Tragedies of Undocumented Immigration [3 volumes]

Author: Lois Ann Lorentzen

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1440828482

Category: Political Science

Page: 1106

View: 6099

The most comprehensive collection of essays on undocumented immigration to date, covering issues not generally found anywhere else on the subject. Three fascinating volumes feature the latest research from the country's top immigration scholars. • Discusses topics rarely covered, including sexual migration, religion, values, and mental health • Features essays across disciplines in the fields of psychology, law, politics, social work, public policy, history, education, and health • Includes tables, maps, photos, and a bibliography for each volume to provide visual interest and additional learning opportunities • Probes the latest controversies centered on recent immigration legislation in Arizona, Georgia, and Alabama • Familiarizes readers with history, theories, and legislation related to undocumented migration in the United States
Release

Handbook on Migration and Social Policy

Author: Gary P. Freeman,Nikola Mirilovic

Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing

ISBN: 178347629X

Category: Political Science

Page: 512

View: 9458

In this comprehensive Handbook, an interdisciplinary team of distinguished scholars from the social sciences explores the connections between migration and social policy. They test conflicting claims as to the positive and negative effects of different types of migration against the experience of countries in Europe, North America, Australasia, the Middle East and South Asia, assessing arguments as to migration’s impact on the financial, social and political stability and sustainability of social programs. The volume reflects the authors’ curiosity about the controversy over the connection between social and cultural diversity and popular support for the welfare state. Providing timely and original chapters which both critique the existing literature as well as build on and advance theoretical understanding, the authors focus on the formal settlement and integration polices created for migrants as well as corollary state policies affecting migrants and migration. A clutch of chapters investigates the linkage between migration and trade theory, foreign direct investment, globalization, public opinion, public education and welfare programs. Chapters then deal with leading receiving states as well as India and the authors examine the regulation of migration at the subnational, national, regional and global levels. The topic of migration and security is also covered. This compelling and exhaustive review of existing scholarship and state-of -the-art original empirical analysis is essential reading for graduates and academics researching the field.
Release

Migrant Marginality

A Transnational Perspective

Author: Philip Kretsedemas,Jorge Capetillo-Ponce,Glenn Jacobs

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135921539

Category: Social Science

Page: 360

View: 4854

This edited book uses migrant marginality to problematize several different aspects of global migration. It examines how many different societies have defined their national identities, cultural values and terms of political membership through (and in opposition to) constructions of migrants and migration. The book includes case studies from Western and Eastern Europe, North America and the Caribbean. It is organized into thematic sections that illustrate how different aspects of migrant marginality have unfolded across several national contexts. The first section of the book examines the limitations of multicultural policies that have been used to incorporate migrants into the host society. The second section examines anti-immigrant discourses and get-tough enforcement practices that are geared toward excluding and removing criminalized “aliens”. The third section examines some of the gendered dimensions of migrant marginality. The fourth section examines the way that racially marginalized populations have engaged the politics of immigration, constructing themselves as either migrants or natives. The book offers researchers, policy makers and students an appreciation for the various policy concerns, ethical dilemmas and political and cultural antagonisms that must be engaged in order to properly understand the problem of migrant marginality.
Release

The Crisis of Multiculturalism in Europe

A History

Author: Rita Chin

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 140088490X

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 5252

A history of modern European cultural pluralism, its current crisis, and its uncertain future In 2010, the leaders of Germany, Britain, and France each declared that multiculturalism had failed in their countries. Over the past decade, a growing consensus in Europe has voiced similar decrees. But what do these ominous proclamations, from across the political spectrum, mean? From the influx of immigrants in the 1950s to contemporary worries about refugees and terrorism, The Crisis of Multiculturalism in Europe examines the historical development of multiculturalism on the Continent. Rita Chin argues that there were few efforts to institute state-sponsored policies of multiculturalism, and those that emerged were pronounced failures virtually from their inception. She shows that today's crisis of support for cultural pluralism isn't new but actually has its roots in the 1980s. Chin looks at the touchstones of European multiculturalism, from the urgent need for laborers after World War II to the public furor over the publication of The Satanic Verses and the question of French girls wearing headscarves to school. While many Muslim immigrants had lived in Europe for decades, in the 1980s they came to be defined by their religion and the public's preoccupation with gender relations. Acceptance of sexual equality became the critical gauge of Muslims' compatibility with Western values. The convergence of left and right around the defense of such personal freedoms against a putatively illiberal Islam has threatened to undermine commitment to pluralism as a core ideal. Chin contends that renouncing the principles of diversity brings social costs, particularly for the left, and she considers how Europe might construct an effective political engagement with its varied population. Challenging the mounting opposition to a diverse society, The Crisis of Multiculturalism in Europe presents a historical investigation into one continent's troubled relationship with cultural difference.
Release

Human Rights, Migration, and Social Conflict

Towards a Decolonized Global Justice

Author: Ariadna Estévez

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137097558

Category: Political Science

Page: 226

View: 8125

This book uses human rights as part of a constructivist methodology designed to establish a causal relationship between human rights violations and different types of social and political conflict in Europe and North America.
Release

The Camp of the Saints

Author: Jean Raspail

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781881780076

Category: Fiction

Page: 316

View: 2187

"Published for the first time in 1973, Camp of the Saints is a novel that anticipates a situation that seems plausible today and foresees a threat that no longer seems unbelevable to anyone: it describes the peaceful invasion of France, and then of the West, by a third world burgeoned into multitudes. At all levels - global consciousness, governments, societies, and especially every person within himself - the question is asked belatedly: what's to be done?"--Author's introduction to the 1985 French edition.
Release

The Ethics of Immigration

Author: Joseph Carens

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199986967

Category: Political Science

Page: 384

View: 462

In The Ethics of Immigration, Joseph Carens synthesizes a lifetime of work to explore and illuminate one of the most pressing issues of our time. Immigration poses practical problems for western democracies and also challenges the ways in which people in democracies think about citizenship and belonging, about rights and responsibilities, and about freedom and equality. Carens begins by focusing on current immigration controversies in North America and Europe about access to citizenship, the integration of immigrants, temporary workers, irregular migrants and the admission of family members and refugees. Working within the moral framework provided by liberal democratic values, he argues that some of the practices of democratic states in these areas are morally defensible, while others need to be reformed. In the last part of the book he moves beyond the currently feasible to ask questions about immigration from a more fundamental perspective. He argues that democratic values of freedom and equality ultimately entail a commitment to open borders. Only in a world of open borders, he contends, will we live up to our most basic principles. Many will not agree with some of Carens' claims, especially his controversial conclusion, but none will be able to dismiss his views lightly. Powerfully argued by one of the world's leading political philosophers on the issue, The Ethics of Immigration is a landmark work on one of the most important global social trends of our era.
Release

Cosmopolitan Sex Workers

Women and Migration in a Global City

Author: Christine B.N. Chin

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199890919

Category: Political Science

Page: 234

View: 6890

Analysis of the women who migrate for sex work, the organizations that facilitate these placements and the hierarchies that persist within the trade, all of which unfold in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
Release

A Nation of Immigrants

Author: John F. Kennedy

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN: 0062892843

Category: Social Science

Page: 160

View: 4128

This significant contribution to the debate on immigration reform was President John F. Kennedy’s final book and is as timely now as it was when it was first published—now reissued for its 60th anniversary, with a new introduction and foreword. “In this book, President Kennedy tells us what immigrants have done for America, and what America has done for its immigrants. It is one of the dramatic success stories of world history.... It can stand as a testament to a cause President Kennedy cherished, and which we should carry on.” — Robert F. Kennedy Throughout his presidency, John F. Kennedy was passionate about the issue of immigration reform. He believed that America is a nation of people who value both tradition and the exploration of new frontiers, people who deserve the freedom to build better lives for themselves in their adopted homeland. This 60th anniversary edition of his posthumously published, timeless work—with a new introduction, a new foreword by Jonathan Greenblatt, the national director and CEO of the Anti-Defamation League, and updated information on immigration policy reform—offers the late president's inspiring suggestions for immigration policy and presents a chronology of the main events in the history of immigration in America. As continued debates on immigration engulf the nation, this paean to the importance of immigrants to our nation's prominence and success is as timely as ever.
Release

Territories of Citizenship

Author: L. Beckman,E. Erman

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137031700

Category: Political Science

Page: 172

View: 3869

A comprehensive exploration of theories of citizenship and inclusiveness in an age of globalization. The authors analyze democracy and the political community in a transnational context, using new critical, conceptual and normative perspectives on the borders, territories and political agents of the state.
Release

Women's Human Rights and Migration

Sex-Selective Abortion Laws in the United States and India

Author: Sital Kalantry

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 081224933X

Category: Law

Page: 272

View: 8735

In Women's Human Rights and Migration, Sital Kalantry examines the laws to ban sex-selective abortion in the United States and India to argue for a transnational feminist legal approach to evaluating prohibitions on the practices of immigrant women that raise human rights concerns.
Release