Society and the Internet

How Networks of Information and Communication Are Changing Our Lives

Author: Manuel Castells

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199661995

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 390

View: 528

How is society being shaped by the diffusion and increasing centrality of the Internet in everyday life and work? By bringing together leading research that addresses some of the most significant cultural, economic, and political roles of the Internet, this volume introduces students to a core set of readings that address this question in specific social and institutional contexts. Internet Studies is a burgeoning new field, which has been central to the Oxford Internet Institute (OII), an innovative multi-disciplinary department at the University of Oxford. Society and the Internet builds on the OII's evolving series of lectures on society and the Internet. The series has been edited to create a reader to supplement upper-division undergraduate and graduate courses that seek to introduce students to scholarship focused on the implications of the Internet for networked societies around the world. The chapters of the reader are rooted in a variety of disciplines, but all directly tackle the powerful ways in which the Internet is linked to political, social, cultural, and economic transformations in society. This book will be a starting point for anyone with a serious interest in the factors shaping the Internet and its impact on society. The book begins with an introduction by the editors, which provides a brief history of the Internet and Web and its study from multi-disciplinary perspectives. The chapters are grouped into six focused sections: The Internet and Everyday Life; Information and Culture on the Line; Networked Politics and Government; Networked Businesses, Industries, and Economies; and Technological and Regulatory Histories and Futures.
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Society and the Internet

How Networks of Information and Communication are Changing Our Lives

Author: Manuel Castells

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0199662002

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 416

View: 8206

How is society being shaped by the diffusion and increasing centrality of the Internet in everyday life and work? By bringing together leading research that addresses some of the most significant cultural, economic, and political roles of the Internet, this volume introduces students to a core set of readings that address this question in specific social and institutional contexts. Internet Studies is a burgeoning new field, which has been central to the Oxford Internet Institute (OII), an innovative multi-disciplinary department at the University of Oxford. Society and the Internet builds on the OII's evolving series of lectures on society and the Internet. The series has been edited to create a reader to supplement upper-division undergraduate and graduate courses that seek to introduce students to scholarship focused on the implications of the Internet for networked societies around the world. The chapters of the reader are rooted in a variety of disciplines, but all directly tackle the powerful ways in which the Internet is linked to political, social, cultural, and economic transformations in society. This book will be a starting point for anyone with a serious interest in the factors shaping the Internet and its impact on society. The book begins with an introduction by the editors, which provides a brief history of the Internet and Web and its study from multi-disciplinary perspectives. The chapters are grouped into six focused sections: The Internet and Everyday Life; Information and Culture on the Line; Networked Politics and Government; Networked Businesses, Industries, and Economies; and Technological and Regulatory Histories and Futures.
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Society and the Internet

How Networks of Information and Communication are Changing Our Lives

Author: Mark Graham,William H. Dutton

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191638056

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 384

View: 5501

How is society being shaped by the diffusion and increasing centrality of the Internet in everyday life and work? By bringing together leading research that addresses some of the most significant cultural, economic, and political roles of the Internet, this volume introduces students to a core set of readings that address this question in specific social and institutional contexts. Internet Studies is a burgeoning new field, which has been central to the Oxford Internet Institute (OII), an innovative multi-disciplinary department at the University of Oxford. Society and the Internet builds on the OII's evolving series of lectures on society and the Internet. The series has been edited to create a reader to supplement upper-division undergraduate and graduate courses that seek to introduce students to scholarship focused on the implications of the Internet for networked societies around the world. The chapters of the reader are rooted in a variety of disciplines, but all directly tackle the powerful ways in which the Internet is linked to political, social, cultural, and economic transformations in society. This book will be a starting point for anyone with a serious interest in the factors shaping the Internet and its impact on society. The book begins with an introduction by the editors, which provides a brief history of the Internet and Web and its study from multi-disciplinary perspectives. The chapters are grouped into six focused sections: The Internet and Everyday Life; Information and Culture on the Line; Networked Politics and Government; Networked Businesses, Industries, and Economies; and Technological and Regulatory Histories and Futures.
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The Human Society and the Internet. Internet Related Socio-Economic Issues

First International Conference, Human.Society.Internet 2001, Seoul, Korea, July 4-6 2001. Proceedings

Author: Won Kim,Tok-Wang Ling,Yoon-Joon Lee,Seung-Soo Park

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3540477497

Category: Computers

Page: 476

View: 4360

During the past several years, the world has entered the first phase of the Internet Revolution. Investors showed confidence and faith in the prospects of the Internet driven economy. In the US alone, some 30,000 dot com companies have sprung up to support electronic commerce with a wide variety of business models, technologies, and/or items or services to sell or even give away. Traditional businesses, so called brick and mortar, or offline, businesses, have started to respond to challenges by Internet based new competitors by augmenting their own businesses with Internet based, or online, businesses and/or filing lawsuits against them. The initial business to consumer orientation of electronic commerce is giving way to business to business commerce, with large corporations forming electronic exchanges or consortia to conduct commerce among members. Government, industry, and civic groups have started addressing social issues related to the Internet, such as taxation on electronic commerce, privacy, intellectual property rights, security, hacking, cyber crimes, digital divide, etc. Governments have started legitimizing electronic signatures and stepping up efforts to track down perpetrators of cyber crimes. The courts have started to wrestle with issues of privacy, intellectual property rights, crimes, and impediments to Internet driven economy.
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Internet, Society and Culture

Communicative Practices Before and After the Internet

Author: Tim Jordan

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1441154108

Category: Social Science

Page: 176

View: 4099

The internet has changed the way we communicate and so changed society and culture. Internet, Society, and Culture offers an understanding of this change by examining two case studies of pre and post internet communication. The first case study is of letters sent to and from Australia in 1835-1858 and the second is a study of online gaming. In both case studies, the focus is on the ways communication is created. The result is the definition of two types of communication that are lived simultaneously in the twenty-first century. One type of communication is from before the internet and relies on the body having touched and created a message-for example, by attaching signature-to stabilise the nature of sender, message and receiver. Internet-dependant communication is different because no identity-marker can be trusted on the internet and so individuals' styles of communicating are used to stabilise the transmission of messages. Being after the internet means having to live these two contradictory forms of communication.
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The Internet Galaxy

Reflections on the Internet, Business, and Society

Author: Manuel Castells

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780199255771

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 304

View: 9631

Castells helps us understand how the Internet came into being and how it is affecting every area of human life. This guide reveals the Internet's huge capacity to liberate, but also its possibility to exclude those who do not have access to it.
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Digital Divide

Civic Engagement, Information Poverty, and the Internet Worldwide

Author: Pippa Norris

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521002233

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 303

View: 9890

There is widespread concern that the explosive growth of the Internet is exacerbating existing inequalities between the information rich and poor. Digital Divide sets out to examine the evidence for access and use of the Internet in 179 nations across the world. A global divide is evident between industrialized and developing societies. A social divide is apparent between rich and poor within each nation. And within the online community, evidence for a democratic divide is emerging between those who do and do not use Internet resources to engage, mobilize and participate in public life.
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Internet and the Law

Technology, Society, and Compromises

Author: Aaron Schwabach

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1610693507

Category: Computers

Page: 352

View: 9221

The world of Internet law is constantly changing and is difficult to follow, even for those for whom doing so is a full-time job. This updated, everything-you-need-to-know reference removes the uncertainty.
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Comparative Information Technology

Languages, Societies and the Internet

Author: Joseph Zajda,Donna Gibbs

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1402094264

Category: Education

Page: 200

View: 7316

Comparative Information Technology: Languages, Societies and the Internet, which is the fourth volume in the 12-volume series Globalisation, Comparative Education and Policy Research, offers a critique of the nexus between ICT and its impact on society, individuals and educational institutions. One of the most signification dimensions of globalisation has been the rapid development of information and communications technologies (ICTs). Our lives have been changed by this in numerous ways and the implications for education are en- mous. The ICTs have transformed the linguistic, cognitive and visual dim- sions of human communication, as well as our perceptions of the self, and social identity in the global culture. The ICTs have facilitated the development of new dimensions of digital literacy, such as blogging and sms messaging. In this sense, cyberlanguage continues to evolve by borrowing and adapting familiar words, coining new expressions, and embracing particular styles (Gibbs & Krause, 2006, 2007). However, information technology can be both empowering and disempowering. Individuals use the Internet, notebooks, and their BlackBerries and communicate via email. If clothing is an extension of one’s skin, then the ICT has become an extension of our bodies. In a globalised world, linked through the Internet, a n- formed identity can lead to a multiplicity of identities, some contradictory to each other, and some taking place primarily in the virtual communities of cyberspace.
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Digital Citizenship

The Internet, Society, and Participation

Author: Karen Mossberger,Caroline J. Tolbert,Ramona S. McNeal

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262250195

Category: Political Science

Page: 240

View: 3536

Just as education has promoted democracy and economic growth, the Internet has the potential to benefit society as a whole. Digital citizenship, or the ability to participate in society online, promotes social inclusion. But statistics show that significant segments of the population are still excluded from digital citizenship. The authors of this book define digital citizens as those who are online daily. By focusing on frequent use, they reconceptualize debates about the digital divide to include both the means and the skills to participate online. They offer new evidence (drawn from recent national opinion surveys and Current Population Surveys) that technology use matters for wages and income, and for civic engagement and voting. Digital Citizenship examines three aspects of participation in society online: economic opportunity, democratic participation, and inclusion in prevailing forms of communication. The authors find that Internet use at work increases wages, with less-educated and minority workers receiving the greatest benefit, and that Internet use is significantly related to political participation, especially among the young. The authors examine in detail the gaps in technological access among minorities and the poor and predict that this digital inequality is not likely to disappear in the near future. Public policy, they argue, must address educational and technological disparities if we are to achieve full participation and citizenship in the twenty-first century.
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The Internet, Power and Society

Rethinking the Power of the Internet to Change Lives

Author: Marcus Leaning

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN: 1780631685

Category: Computers

Page: 194

View: 9166

An exciting challenge to how the internet and ICT have been understood in academia and popular culture and shows how important ‘cultural’ assumptions are in how we understand technology. The Internet, Power and Society argues that the way in which we view technology such as the internet owes much to older, historic views of the media and to ‘issues’ in contemporary society. Such perspectives are deeply rooted in a Western view of technology and the book concludes by offering a radically new perspective as to how the internet can change a society that is truly global in its application. An original approach to ICT and the Internet that challenges the orthodoxy Very topical subject matter - the book addresses many of the issues regarded of key import in high level political discussions (such as the World Summit on the Information Society); the current understanding of ICT and how to move beyond this interpretation An approach that moves the debate forward and offers a truly global way of understanding the Internet and ICT
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Civil Society and the Internet in Japan

Author: Isa Ducke

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134113439

Category: Computers

Page: 208

View: 9363

Using case studies, interviews, and empirical sources, this book analyzes the strategies and impact of Internet use by civil society actors and asks how useful it is for their work – does the availability of Internet tools change the way citizens’ groups work, does it influence their effectiveness, and does it do so differently in Japan from other countries? Four fascinating studies take a closer look at the role of the Internet during the history textbook controversy; strategies of small citizen's groups; comparisons between internet use in Japan, Korea and Germany; and how the internet is used as a platform to discuss the dispatch of Japanese troops in Iraq. Isa Ducke has produced an original work that will be of interest to students and scholars of Japanese politics, media and information technology and civil society.
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Internet and Society

Social Theory in the Information Age

Author: Christian Fuchs

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135898820

Category: Computers

Page: 816

View: 3605

In this exceptional study, Christian Fuchs discusses how the internet has transformed the lives of human beings and social relationships in contemporary society. By outlining a social theory of the internet and the information society, he demonstrates how the ecological, economic, political, and cultural systems of contemporary society have been transformed by new ICTs. Fuchs highlights how new forms of cooperation and competition are advanced and supported by the internet in subsystems of society and also discusses opportunities and risks of the information society.
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The Oxford Handbook of Internet Studies

Author: William H. Dutton

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191641189

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 632

View: 1781

Internet Studies has been one of the most dynamic and rapidly expanding interdisciplinary fields to emerge over the last decade. The Oxford Handbook of Internet Studies has been designed to provide a valuable resource for academics and students in this area, bringing together leading scholarly perspectives on how the Internet has been studied and how the research agenda should be pursued in the future. The Handbook aims to focus on Internet Studies as an emerging field, each chapter seeking to provide a synthesis and critical assessment of the research in a particular area. Topics covered include social perspectives on the technology of the Internet, its role in everyday life and work, implications for communication, power, and influence, and the governance and regulation of the Internet. The Handbook is a landmark in this new interdisciplinary field, not only helping to strengthen research on the key questions, but also shape research, policy, and practice across many disciplines that are finding the Internet and its political, economic, cultural, and other societal implications increasingly central to their own key areas of inquiry.
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The Zero Marginal Cost Society

The Internet of Things, the Collaborative Commons, and the Eclipse of Capitalism

Author: Jeremy Rifkin

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 1137437766

Category: Political Science

Page: 368

View: 1989

In The Zero Marginal Cost Society, New York Times bestselling author Jeremy Rifkin describes how the emerging Internet of Things is speeding us to an era of nearly free goods and services, precipitating the meteoric rise of a global Collaborative Commons and the eclipse of capitalism. Rifkin uncovers a paradox at the heart of capitalism that has propelled it to greatness but is now taking it to its death—the inherent entrepreneurial dynamism of competitive markets that drives productivity up and marginal costs down, enabling businesses to reduce the price of their goods and services in order to win over consumers and market share. (Marginal cost is the cost of producing additional units of a good or service, if fixed costs are not counted.) While economists have always welcomed a reduction in marginal cost, they never anticipated the possibility of a technological revolution that might bring marginal costs to near zero, making goods and services priceless, nearly free, and abundant, and no longer subject to market forces. Now, a formidable new technology infrastructure—the Internet of things (IoT)—is emerging with the potential of pushing large segments of economic life to near zero marginal cost in the years ahead. Rifkin describes how the Communication Internet is converging with a nascent Energy Internet and Logistics Internet to create a new technology platform that connects everything and everyone. Billions of sensors are being attached to natural resources, production lines, the electricity grid, logistics networks, recycling flows, and implanted in homes, offices, stores, vehicles, and even human beings, feeding Big Data into an IoT global neural network. Prosumers can connect to the network and use Big Data, analytics, and algorithms to accelerate efficiency, dramatically increase productivity, and lower the marginal cost of producing and sharing a wide range of products and services to near zero, just like they now do with information goods. The plummeting of marginal costs is spawning a hybrid economy—part capitalist market and part Collaborative Commons—with far reaching implications for society, according to Rifkin. Hundreds of millions of people are already transferring parts of their economic lives to the global Collaborative Commons. Prosumers are plugging into the fledgling IoT and making and sharing their own information, entertainment, green energy, and 3D-printed products at near zero marginal cost. They are also sharing cars, homes, clothes and other items via social media sites, rentals, redistribution clubs, and cooperatives at low or near zero marginal cost. Students are enrolling in free massive open online courses (MOOCs) that operate at near zero marginal cost. Social entrepreneurs are even bypassing the banking establishment and using crowdfunding to finance startup businesses as well as creating alternative currencies in the fledgling sharing economy. In this new world, social capital is as important as financial capital, access trumps ownership, sustainability supersedes consumerism, cooperation ousts competition, and "exchange value" in the capitalist marketplace is increasingly replaced by "sharable value" on the Collaborative Commons. Rifkin concludes that capitalism will remain with us, albeit in an increasingly streamlined role, primarily as an aggregator of network services and solutions, allowing it to flourish as a powerful niche player in the coming era. We are, however, says Rifkin, entering a world beyond markets where we are learning how to live together in an increasingly interdependent global Collaborative Commons.
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The Internet Is Not the Answer

Author: Andrew Keen

Publisher: Open Road + Grove/Atlantic

ISBN: 0802192319

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 288

View: 2974

The renowned Internet commentator and author of How to Fix the Future“expos[es] the greed, egotism and narcissism that fuels the tech world” (Chicago Tribune). The Digital Revolution has contributed to the world in many positive ways, but we are less aware of the Internet’s deeply negative effects. The Internet Is Not the Answer, by longtime Internet skeptic Andrew Keen, offers a comprehensive look at what the Internet is doing to our lives. The book traces the technological and economic history of the Internet, from its founding in the 1960s through the rise of big data companies to the increasing attempts to monetize almost every human activity. In this sharp, witty narrative, informed by the work of other writers, reporters, and academics, as well as his own research and interviews, Keen shows us the tech world, warts and all. Startling and important, The Internet Is Not the Answer is a big-picture look at what the Internet is doing to our society and an investigation of what we can do to try to make sure the decisions we are making about the reconfiguring of our world do not lead to unpleasant, unforeseen aftershocks. “Andrew Keen has written a very powerful and daring manifesto questioning whether the Internet lives up to its own espoused values. He is not an opponent of Internet culture, he is its conscience, and must be heard.” —Po Bronson, #1 New York Times–bestselling author
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Media,Technology and Society

A History: From the Telegraph to the Internet

Author: Brian Winston

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134766335

Category: Social Science

Page: 392

View: 535

Challenging the popular myth of a present-day 'information revolution', Media Technology and Society is essential reading for anyone interested in the social impact of technological change. Winston argues that the development of new media forms, from the telegraph and the telephone to computers, satellite and virtual reality, is the product of a constant play-off between social necessity and suppression: the unwritten law by which new technologies are introduced into society only insofar as their disruptive potential is limited.
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Science and Technology in Society

From Biotechnology to the Internet

Author: Daniel Lee Kleiman

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1405148195

Category: Social Science

Page: 160

View: 3731

This thoughtful and engaging text challenges the widely held notion of science as somehow outside of society, and the idea that technology proceeds automatically down a singular and inevitable path. Through specific case studies involving contemporary debates, this book shows that science and technology are fundamentally part of society and are shaped by it. Draws on concepts from political sociology, organizational analysis, and contemporary social theory. Avoids dense theoretical debate. Includes case studies and concluding chapter summaries for students and scholars.
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Internet and Society in Latin America and the Caribbean

Author: Gilles Cliche,Marcelo Bonilla,International Development Research Centre (Canada)

Publisher: IDRC

ISBN: 9781552500170

Category: Computers

Page: 435

View: 6191

This book presents pioneering research that is designed to show, from a qualitative and ethnographic perspective, how new information and communication technologies, as applied to the school system and to local governance initiatives, merely reproduce traditional pedagogical approaches and the dominant forms by which power is exercised at the local level. The studies thus constitute points of departure for further thinking about the need to promote an Internet culture based on the social application of a OC right to communication and cultureOCO and an OC Internet right, OCO that will permit the establishment of true citizen participation and free access to knowledge, with due regard to personal and individual rights such as those of privacy and intimacy."
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Psychology and the Internet

Intrapersonal, Interpersonal, and Transpersonal Implications

Author: Jayne Gackenbach

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN: 0080469051

Category: Psychology

Page: 392

View: 7320

The previous edition provided the first resource for examining how the Internet affects our definition of who we are and our communication and work patterns. It examined how normal behavior differs from the pathological with respect to Internet use. Coverage includes how the internet is used in our social patterns: work, dating, meeting people of similar interests, how we use it to conduct business, how the Internet is used for learning, children and the Internet, what our internet use says about ourselves, and the philosophical ramifications of internet use on our definitions of reality and consciousness. Since its publication in 1998, a slew of other books on the topic have emerged, many speaking solely to internet addiction, learning on the web, or telehealth. There are few competitors that discuss the breadth of impact the internet has had on intrpersonal, interpersonal, and transpersonal psychology. Provides the first resource for looking at how the Internet affects our definition of who we are Examines the philosophical ramifications of Internet use and our definitions of self, reality, and work Explores how the Internet is used to meet new friends and love interests, as well as to conduct business Discusses what represents normal behavior with respect to Internet use
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