Read All About It!

A History of the British Newspaper

Author: Kevin Williams

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113428053X

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 2641

This Text-book traces the evolution of the newspaper, documenting its changing form, style and content as well as identifying the different roles ascribed to it by audiences, government and other social institutions. Starting with the early 17th century, when the first prototype newspapers emerged, through Dr Johnson, the growth of the radical press in the early 19th century, the Lord Northcliffe revolution in the early 20th century, the newspapers wars of the 1930s and the rise of the tabloid in the 1970s, right up to Rupert Murdoch and the online revolution, the book explores the impact of the newspapers on our lives and its role in British society. Using lively and entertaining examples, Kevin Williams illustrates the changing form of the newspaper in its social, political, economic and cultural context. As well as telling the story of the newspaper, he explores key topics in detail, making this an ideal text for students of journalism and the British newspaper. Issues include: newspapers and social change the changing face of regional newspapers the impact of new technology development of reporting techniques forms of press regulation
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Communications, Media and the Imperial Experience

Britain and India in the Twentieth Century

Author: Chandrika Kaul

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137445963

Category: Music

Page: 278

View: 6004

Presenting a communicational perspective on the British empire in India during the 20th century, the book seeks to examine how, and explain why, British proconsuls, civil servants and even the monarch George V, as well as Indian nationalists, interacted with the media, primarily British and American, and with what consequences.
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Maiden Tribute

A Life of W.T. Stead

Author: Grace Eckley

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 1462838111

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 464

View: 2618

Maiden Tribute: A Life of W. T. Stead This journalist who communicated with his Senior Partner instantaneously, whose ecumenical advance beyond his epoch still startles his readers, throughout his life retained his Whitmanesque individualism and rugged speech. W. T. Stead frequently scoffed at the Anglican Sunday prayers that instructed God how to direct the affairs of the world. If God did not comply, it was not for want of pious instruction. Anglicans were wanting, and most of his late Victorian-Edwardian world was Anglican. W. T. Stead (1849-1912) was a Nonconforrmist with and without the capital n. Had he been born with a wooden spoon in his mouth, it meant only that God needed his help to make the world silver. He never ceased to believe the world could be made silver, for mankind in general was anonymously, even though sluggishly, contributing to the infinite ascending spiral traced by the finger of God between the universe and the ideal. Clearly, the position of women in the 1870s was far from the ideal, remote from the privileges selfishly guarded by men. Taking a cue from his mother who campaigned against the Contagious Diseases Actswhich punished women but not men for transmitting syphilishe determined to bring women nearer the honors of Mary the Mother and Mary the Magdalen, for these two women stand out against the gloom of the past radiant as the angels of God, and yet the true ideals of the womanhood of the world. Such appeared implausible. Everywhere he saw in the streets wretched ruins of humanity, women stamped and crushed into devils by society . . . . And the children nursed in debauchery, suckled in crime, predestined to a life of misery and shame! Mrs. Josephine Butler already knew that Britains leadership would not assist: in the grandest house of the kind in Paris, are to be seen portraits of all the great men who had frequented themdiplomatists, generals, and English Lords . . . . The brothel-keeper put a cross underneath the portrait at each visit, to mark the number of visits made to the house by these great men! Before he visited London, the export of English girls for State-regulated prostitution in Brussels imposed upon Stead a sense that he was destined to write an Uncle Toms Cabin on The Slavery of Europe. The burden is greater than I can bear. But if it is ultimately to be laid on my back, God will strengthen me for it. If I have to write it I shall have to plunge into the depths of the social hell, and that is impossible outside a great city. Even high-minded seekers of justice found the social hell a place they could not venture into. Initiating research for The Maiden Tribute of Modern Babylon, Stead took counsel with civic powers Lord Carnarvon, John Morley, Arthur Balfour, Henry Labouchere among others, and Sir Charles Russell, who declined an invitation to see for himself because as leader of the English Bar he could not play the rle of a detective in a house of ill-fame. As the shocking series of four daily exposes neared its close, why others had not done Steads work was explained by Benjamin Scott, the City Chamberlain who had prompted Stead to take up the cause: We had not the ability or the opportunity that Stead possessed, and lacked the courage. Stead had begun the Maiden Tribute with a complaint against British society, that chivalry was dead and Christianity effete. Benjamin Waugh praised him after the fact: The spirit of both survives in you to-day. Stead accomplished his goal: passage of the Criminal Law Amendment Act, still in force today. Why the British sent him to jail for passing the first child protection law is graced with the word technicality. Branded both a saint and a filthy ex-convict, Stead continued to use his journalistic strength to achieve justice for citizens; in the 1890s he turned to internationalism. Lobbying for arbitration for settling international disputes, he crafted a memorial calling for li
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The First Lady of Fleet Street

The Life of Rachel Beer: Crusading Heiress and Newspaper Pioneer

Author: Eilat Negev,Yehuda Koren

Publisher: Bantam

ISBN: 0345532384

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 368

View: 9959

A panoramic portrait of a remarkable woman and the tumultuous Victorian era on which she made her mark, The First Lady of Fleet Street chronicles the meteoric rise and tragic fall of Rachel Beer—indomitable heiress, social crusader, and newspaper pioneer. Rich with period detail and drawing on a wealth of original material, this sweeping work of never-before-told history recounts the ascent of two of London’s most prominent Jewish immigrant families—the Sassoons and the Beers. Born into one, Rachel married into the other, wedding newspaper proprietor Frederick Beer, the sole heir to his father’s enormous fortune. Though she and Frederick became leading London socialites, Rachel was ambitious and unwilling to settle for a comfortable, idle life. She used her husband’s platform to assume the editorship of not one but two venerable Sunday newspapers—the Sunday Times and The Observer—a stunning accomplishment at a time when women were denied the vote and allowed little access to education. Ninety years would pass before another woman would take the helm of a major newspaper on either side of the Atlantic. It was an exhilarating period in London’s history—fortunes were being amassed (and squandered), masterpieces were being created, and new technologies were revolutionizing daily life. But with scant access to politicians and press circles, most female journalists were restricted to issuing fashion reports and dispatches from the social whirl. Rachel refused to limit herself or her beliefs. In the pages of her newspapers, she opined on Whitehall politics and British imperial adventures abroad, campaigned for women’s causes, and doggedly pursued the evidence that would exonerate an unjustly accused French military officer in the so-called Dreyfus Affair. But even as she successfully blazed a trail in her professional life, Rachel’s personal travails were the stuff of tragedy. Her marriage to Frederick drove an insurmountable wedge between herself and her conservative family. Ultimately, she was forced to retreat from public life entirely, living out the rest of her days in stately isolation. While the men of her era may have grabbed more headlines, Rachel Beer remains a pivotal figure in the annals of journalism—and the long march toward equality between the sexes. With The First Lady of Fleet Street, she finally gets the front page treatment she deserves.
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The Diaries of a Fleet Street Fox

Author: Lilly Miles

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 1780338139

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 160

View: 2499

SEX, DRUGS, HEARTBREAK AND SCANDAL - THE INNER WORKINGS OF A TABLOID NEWSROOM Fleet Street Fox's anonymity allows her to delve deep into the dark corners of that most guilty of pleasures - the tabloid exposé. Acerbic, funny, and revelatory, her diaries show the heart within the hack as she tries to recover from a betrayal as devastating as any newspaper scandal. Now an internet smash, with over forty thousand followers on twitter, two hugely popular blogs and a reputation throughout the media industry, Foxy's diaries are juicy, shocking and as near to the knuckle as the lawyers would allow. The Diaries of a Fleet Street Fox tells the truth about her trade: the private scandals, victories and disasters that don't end up on the front page. This is the hardest story she has ever told.
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Notes and Queries

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Questions and answers

Page: N.A

View: 8539

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Fifty Years of Fleet Street

Being the Life and Recollections of Sir John R. Robinson

Author: Frederick Moy Thomas

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Journalists

Page: 404

View: 6596

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Sixty Years of Journalism

Anecdotes and Reminiscences

Author: Harry Findlater Bussey

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Journalism

Page: 303

View: 9188

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Shouting in the Street

Adventures and Misadventures of a Fleet Street Survivor

Author: Donald Trelford

Publisher: Biteback Publishing

ISBN: 1785903535

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 480

View: 6888

In this long-awaited book Donald Trelford recalls his adventures and misadventures during nearly sixty years in journalism. Described as the ‘Rocky Marciano of newspaper politics’, he fought off politicians, owners and predators over a quarter-century at The Observer, including Rupert Murdoch, who said afterwards: ‘I made the mistake of underestimating Donald Trelford. One owner sold The Observer because the editor refused to bow to pressure to support Margaret Thatcher. Another tried to sack him for writing the first report of atrocities committed by Robert Mugabe’s forces in Zimbabwe. He tells for the first time the inside story of his complex relationship with Tiny Rowland – often tense, sometimes hilarious - and about his role in the notorious Pamella Bordes affair. He recalls how he was held at gunpoint by the FBI and strip-searched by the KGB. How a black dictator poked him in the chest and yelled: ‘Keep out of my politics, white man. While he was editor, The Observer won more press awards than any other newspaper. Trelford himself was described by Peter Preston, the former Guardian editor, as “a crusader... multi-talented, hands-on, a master of sport as well as news, shrewd and decisive.” Written with style and humour, this is a compelling account of an important period in the history of the British press.
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The Irregulars

Roald Dahl and the British Spy Ring in Wartime Washington

Author: Jennet Conant

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1416580328

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 2907

When Roald Dahl, a dashing young wounded RAF pilot, took up his post at the British Embassy in Washington in 1942, his assignment was to use his good looks, wit, and considerable charm to gain access to the most powerful figures in American political life. A patriot eager to do his part to save his country from a Nazi invasion, he invaded the upper reaches of the U.S. government and Georgetown society, winning over First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt and her husband, Franklin; befriending wartime leaders from Henry Wallace to Henry Morgenthau; and seducing the glamorous freshman congresswoman Clare Boothe Luce. Dahl would soon be caught up in a complex web of deception masterminded by William Stephenson, aka Intrepid, Churchill's legendary spy chief, who, with President Roosevelt's tacit permission, mounted a secret campaign of propaganda and political subversion to weaken American isolationist forces, bring the country into the war against Germany, and influence U.S. policy in favor of England. Known as the British Security Coordination (BSC) -- though the initiated preferred to think of themselves as the Baker Street Irregulars in honor of the amateurs who aided Sherlock Holmes -- these audacious agents planted British propaganda in American newspapers and radio programs, covertly influenced leading journalists -- including Drew Pearson, Walter Winchell, and Walter Lippmann -- harassed prominent isolationists and anti-New Dealers, and plotted against American corporations that did business with the Third Reich. In an account better than spy fiction, Jennet Conant shows Dahl progressing from reluctant diplomat to sly man-about-town, parlaying his morale-boosting wartime propaganda work into a successful career as an author, which leads to his entrée into the Roosevelt White House and Hyde Park and initiation into British intelligence's elite dirty tricks squad, all in less than three years. He and his colorful coconspirators -- David Ogilvy, Ian Fleming, and Ivar Bryce, recruited more for their imagination and dramatic flair than any experience in the spy business -- gossiped, bugged, and often hilariously bungled their way across Washington, doing their best to carry out their cloak-and-dagger assignments, support the fledgling American intelligence agency (the OSS), and see that Roosevelt was elected to an unprecedented fourth term. It is an extraordinary tale of deceit, double-dealing, and moral ambiguity -- all in the name of victory. Richly detailed and meticulously researched, Conant's compelling narrative draws on never-before-seen wartime letters, diaries, and interviews and provides a rare, and remarkably candid, insider's view of the counterintelligence game during the tumultuous days of World War II.
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My Life

Sixty Years' Recollections of Bohemian London

Author: George Robert Sims

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: London (England)

Page: 351

View: 347

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Classified

Secrecy and the State in Modern Britain

Author: Christopher R. Moran

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107000998

Category: History

Page: 434

View: 6642

Fascinating account of the British state's post-war obsession with secrecy and the ways it prevented secret activities from becoming public.
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The Memoirs of Capt. Peter Drake

Containing, an Account of Many Strange and Surprising Events, which Happened to Him Through a Series of Sixty Years, and Upwards; and Several Material Anecdotes, Regarding King William and Queen Anne's Wars with Lewis XIV. of France

Author: Peter Drake

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Great Britain

Page: 281

View: 9071

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