Rising Sun, Falling Skies

The disastrous Java Sea Campaign of World War II

Author: Jeffrey Cox

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472808347

Category: History

Page: 504

View: 9389

Following the attack on Pearl Harbor, the Japanese offensive in the Far East seemed unstoppable. Allied forces engaged in a futile attempt to halt their rapid advance, culminating in the massed fleet of American, British, Dutch, and Australian forces (ABDA) clashing with the Japanese at the battle of the Java Sea – the first major sea battle of World War II in the Pacific. But, in a campaign crippled by poor leadership and disastrous decisions, the Allied response was catastrophic, losing their largest warships and their tenuous toe-hold in the south Pacific within the first 72 hours of the battle. This defeat left ground troops cut off from reinforcement and supply, with obsolete equipment, no defense against endless Japanese air attacks, and with no chance of retreat. However, although command decisions were to condemn the Allies to defeat, the Allied goal was never an outright victory, simply a delaying action. Facing a relentless and thoroughly vicious enemy, the combined forces responded not by running or surrendering, but by defiantly holding on in a struggle that was as much a test of character, bravery, and determination as it was a test of arms, ultimately costing the Allies ten vessels and the lives of 2,100 brave sailors. In Rising Sun, Falling Skies, Jeffrey Cox examines the events and evidence surrounding the Java Sea Campaign, reconstructing battles that in hindsight were all but hopeless and revealing where fatal mistakes and missed opportunities condemned the Allied forces in an insightful and compelling study of the largely overlooked clash in the Java Sea.
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Morning Star, Midnight Sun

The Early Guadalcanal-Solomons Campaign of World War II August–October 1942

Author: Jeffrey Cox

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472826396

Category: History

Page: 468

View: 3376

Following the disastrous Java Sea campaign, the Allies stopped the Japanese advance at Coral Sea and Midway. But the Japanese still threatened to build a network of bases in the South Pacific and threatened to cut off Australia. In response, Allies made a desperate move by starting their first offensive of the Pacific War. Their first target: a new Japanese airfield in a relatively unknown place in the Solomon Islands called Guadalcanal. Hamstrung by obsolete pre-war thinking and a bureaucratic mind-set, the US Navy had to adapt on the fly in order to compete with the mighty Imperial Japanese Navy. Starting with the amphibious assaults on Guadalcanal and Tulagi and continuing with the worst defeat in US Navy history, the campaign quickly turned into a see-saw struggle where the evenly matched foes struggled to gain the upper hand and grind out a victory. Following on from his hugely successful book Rising Sun, Falling Skies, Jeffrey R. Cox tells the gripping story of the first Allied offensive of the Pacific War, as they sought to regain dominance in the Pacific.
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Playing for Time

War on an Asiatic Fleet Destroyer

Author: Lodwick H. Alford

Publisher: Merriam Press

ISBN: 1576383377

Category:

Page: 302

View: 3571

The author's memoir of his service as an officer on board the destroyer U.S.S. Stewart (DD-224) of the Asiatic Fleet from before the war through its abandonment in a dry dock in Java in February 1942, also serving as a history of the ship's wartime service. The author also provides a history of the Asiatic Fleet during that time period when it was part of the naval forces that stopped the Japanese juggernaut on their southward expansion in the Pacific.
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The Imperial Japanese Army

The Invincible Years 1941–42

Author: Bill Yenne

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1782009825

Category: History

Page: 376

View: 8176

The German offensives which crushed Poland in 1939 and swallowed most of Western Europe in less than two months in 1940 have been well documented and heavily studied, however, the overall picture of the remarkable Japanese offensive land campaign in 1941–42 has received less attention. In this fascinating new book, Bill Yenne documents the years when the Imperial Japanese Army (IJA) was conducting its equally unstoppable ground campaign in the Far East, and unlike other books on this subject, he studies the campaign from the Japanese point of view. He reveals how the IJA were able to conquer huge swathes of Southeast Asia in a little over eight weeks after the attack on Pearl Harbor. Using first-hand accounts from Japanese sources, Yenne reveals the tactics and mindset of the IJA during their offensive, detailing the capturing of Manila, the Philippines, Hong Kong, Singapore, Burma, and the Dutch East Indies. Exploring the infrastructure and technical challenges of waging war across such a huge area, Yenne delves into the hardships that faced individual Japanese soldiers in theatre and explains how the Japanese were able to remain undefeated and establish the aura of invincibility that marked their campaign between 1941–42.
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The Fleet the Gods Forgot

The U.S. Asiatic Fleet in World War II

Author: Walter G. Winslow

Publisher: Naval Institute Press

ISBN: 1612512933

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 7399

The heroic story of the U.S. Asiatic Fleet at the outbreak of World War II and their disastrous encounter with vastly superior Japanese forces.
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Lonely Ships

Author: Edwin Palmer Hoyt

Publisher: Jove Publications

ISBN: 9780515099577

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 1981

On December 8, 1941, Asia's reign of peace collapsed. The U.S. Asiatic Fleet, without a single battleship, attempted a gallant but powerless defense of the Dutch East Indies. Here is the explosive true story of the lonely ships of the Fleet and the men who defended its honor.
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The First South Pacific Campaign

Pacific Fleet Strategy December 1941ÐJune 1942

Author: John Lundstrom

Publisher: Naval Institute Press

ISBN: 1612513522

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 5633

On May 7 and 8, 1942, fast carrier task forces from the United States and Imperial Japanese navies met in combat for the first time in the Battle of the Coral Sea. A strategic victory for the U.S. in spite of the loss of the carrier Lexington, the destroyer Sims and the fleet oiler Neosho, the battle blunted the Japanese drive on Port Moresby, a valuable Allied air and naval base controlling the western Coral Sea and northern Australia. John B. Lundstrom offers a detailed analysis of the fundamental strategies employed by Japan and the U.S. in the South Pacific from January to June 1942, including Japanese equivocation regarding advances in the South Pacific and the vigorous actions of Admiral Ernest J. King to reinforce the area in spite of the presidential decision to concentrate American efforts on Europe and the problem of Germany. Writing in a clear, concise, and readable style, Lundstrom combines strategic insight and careful scholarship with previously untapped source materials to present a book that provides a superb overview of the first six months of the naval war in the South Pacific. First published in 1976, The First South Pacific Campaign is essential reading for a full understanding of the Pacific Fleet’s strategy before the Battle of Midway.
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Hawaii Under the Rising Sun

Japan's Plans for Conquest After Pearl Harbor

Author: John J. Stephan

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN: 9780824825508

Category: History

Page: 228

View: 4406

This lively, provocative study challenges the widely held belief that the Japanese did not intend to invade the Hawaiian Islands. Choice A disquieting book, which shatters several historical illusions that have almost come to be accepted as facts. It will remind historians how complex and ambiguous history really is. American Historical Review "
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Islands of Destiny

The Solomons Campaign and the Eclipse of the Rising Sun

Author: John Prados

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0451414829

Category: History

Page: 388

View: 570

Describes the battles that took place in the Solomon Islands in the Pacific during World War II and offers a theory that credits these battles with being as great a turning point as the Battle of Midway. 30,000 first printing.
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Morning Star, Midnight Sun

The Early Guadalcanal-Solomons Campaign of World War II August–October 1942

Author: Jeffrey Cox

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472826396

Category: History

Page: 468

View: 3299

Following the disastrous Java Sea campaign, the Allies stopped the Japanese advance at Coral Sea and Midway. But the Japanese still threatened to build a network of bases in the South Pacific and threatened to cut off Australia. In response, Allies made a desperate move by starting their first offensive of the Pacific War. Their first target: a new Japanese airfield in a relatively unknown place in the Solomon Islands called Guadalcanal. Hamstrung by obsolete pre-war thinking and a bureaucratic mind-set, the US Navy had to adapt on the fly in order to compete with the mighty Imperial Japanese Navy. Starting with the amphibious assaults on Guadalcanal and Tulagi and continuing with the worst defeat in US Navy history, the campaign quickly turned into a see-saw struggle where the evenly matched foes struggled to gain the upper hand and grind out a victory. Following on from his hugely successful book Rising Sun, Falling Skies, Jeffrey R. Cox tells the gripping story of the first Allied offensive of the Pacific War, as they sought to regain dominance in the Pacific.
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Captured

The Forgotten Men of Guam

Author: Roger Mansell

Publisher: Naval Institute Press

ISBN: 1612511236

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 445

Prior to the outbreak of the Pacific War, Guam was a paradise for U.S. military and civilian employees stationed on the island. Shortly after the attack on Pearl Harbor, however, the Japanese invaded the tiny island, captured the Americans, and shipped them to Japan. Drawing on interviews with survivors, diaries, and archival records, the author documents the mostly unknown story of these American POWs. The men endured horrific hardships, many of which are chronicled in this book for the first time. Also included are moving stories of their liberation, transportation home, and the aftermath of their ordeal.
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Frederick the Great

A Military History

Author: Dennis Showalter

Publisher: Frontline Books

ISBN: 1783034793

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 4431

"Frederick the Great ruled for almost half a century (1740-86) and throughout his reign military matters were a prime preoccupation. For much of it Prussia was actually at war; first during the continent-wide War of Austrian Succession (1740-48) and later, the Seven Years War (1756-63), in which Prussia and Britain were allied against Austria, France, Russia, Sweden, and Saxony. By Frederick's death Prussia had doubled in size, and was overtaking Austria in the struggle for dominance over the German-speaking lands. In this classic work, Showalter surveys the entire range of these wars chronologically, placing the military operations, and Frederick's own policies and ambitions, in their broader social and political context. The result is a formidable analysis of the political and military dynamics of later 18th century Europe which will be necessary reading for all serious students of the period. However Showalter's powerful and vigorous account of these campaigns, and the great battles that decided them, will appeal beyond professional historians to general readers looking for a thrilling story, well told. This edition has been updated to include a new introduction and an excellent bibliographical essay which surveys the latest works on Frederician Prussia and eighteenth-century warfare"--Publisher's description, p. [2] of dust jacket.
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The Imperial Japanese Navy in the Pacific War

Author: Mark Stille

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472809254

Category: History

Page: 392

View: 8874

The Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) was the third most powerful navy in the world at the start of World War II, and came to dominate the Pacific in the early months of the war. This was a remarkable turnaround for a navy that only began to modernize in 1868, although defeats inflicted on the Russians and Chinese in successive wars at the turn of the century gave a sense of the threat the IJN was to pose. Bringing together for the first time material previously published in Osprey series books, and with the addition of new writing making use of the most recent research, this book details the Japanese ships which fought in the Pacific and examines the principles on which they were designed, how they were armed, when and where they were deployed and how effective they were in battle. A valuable reference source for Pacific War enthusiasts and historians, The Imperial Japanese Navy in the Pacific War provides a history of the IJN's deployment and engagements, analysis of the evolution of strategy and tactics, and finally addresses the question of whether it truly was a modern navy, fully prepared for the rigors of combat in the Pacific.
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The Allied Defense of the Malay Barrier, 1941-1942

Author: Tom Womack

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 1476662932

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 3093

Though few realize it, the Netherlands East Indies were the object of Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941. Likewise, their invasions of Guam, Wake Island and the Philippines were mainly diversionary operations to safeguard their main assault on Dutch and British colonies. Since the end of World War I, Japan had coveted the vast East Indies oil reserves, and the colony had feared invasion since Germany overran Holland in May 1940. Isolated politically the weakly defended archipelago was a tempting prize. The East Indies government initially maintained a strict policy of neutrality while desperately working to build up its military strength. As Japanese actions pushed the region toward war, the Dutch reluctantly embraced closer ties with America and Britain. For a brief period, the East Indies were key players in Pacific War strategy. This book details for the first time in English the Dutch prewar strategy, their efforts to counter Japanese espionage and their sizable though largely forgotten military contribution in the early months of the Pacific War.
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Shanghai and Nanjing 1937

Massacre on the Yangtze

Author: Benjamin Lai

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472817516

Category: History

Page: 96

View: 9478

From 1931, China and Japan had been embroiled in a number of small-scale conflicts that had seen vast swathes of territory being occupied by the Japanese. On 7 July 1937, the Japanese engineered the Marco Polo Bridge Incident, which led to the fall of Beijing and Tianjin and the start of a de facto state of war between the two countries. This force then moved south, landing an expeditionary force to take Shanghai and from there drive west to capture Nanjing. This fully illustrated book tells the story of the Japanese assault on these two great Chinese cities. The battle of Shanghai was the first large-scale urban warfare of World War II and one of the bloodiest battles of the entire Sino-Japanese War. The determined resistance by Chinese inflicted sizable Japanese casualties, and may well have contributed to the subsequent massacre of prisoners and civilians in the battle of Nanjing, tarnishing Japan's reputation in the eyes of the world.
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The Pacific War

From Pearl Harbor to Okinawa

Author: Robert O'Neill

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 147281357X

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 5044

On December 7, 1941, Japanese fighter planes appeared from the clouds above Pearl Harbor and fundamentally changed the course of history; with this one surprise attack the previously isolationist America was irrevocably thrown into World War II. This definitive history reveals each of the major battles that America would fight in the ensuing struggle against Imperial Japan, from the naval clashes at Midway and Coral Sea to the desperate, bloody fighting on Iwo Jima and Okinawa. Each chapter reveals both the horrors of the battle and the Allies' grim yet heroic determination to wrest victory from what often seemed to be certain defeat, offering a valuable guide to the long road to victory in the Pacific.
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The First Team

Pacific Naval Air Combat from Pearl Harbor to Midway

Author: John Lundstrom

Publisher: Naval Institute Press

ISBN: 161251166X

Category: History

Page: 576

View: 7209

Hailed as one of the finest examples of aviation research, this comprehensive 1984 study presents a detailed and scrupulously accurate operational history of carrier-based air warfare. From the earliest operations in the Pacific through the decisive Battle of Midway, it offers a narrative account of how ace fighter pilots like Jimmy Thach and Butch O'Hare and their skilled VF squadron mates - called the "first team" - amassed a remarkable combat record in the face of desperate odds. Tapping both American and Japanese sources, historian John B. Lundstrom reconstructs every significant action and places these extraordinary fighters within the context of overall carrier operations. He writes from the viewpoint of the pilots themselves, after interviewing some fifty airmen from each side, to give readers intimate details of some of the most exciting aerial engagements of the war. At the same time he assesses the role the fighter squadrons played in key actions and shows how innovations in fighter tactics and gunnery techniques were a primary reason for the reversal of American fortunes. After more than twenty years in print, the book remains the definitive account and is being published in paperback for the first time to reach an even larger audience.
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Malaya and Singapore 1941–42

The fall of Britain’s empire in the East

Author: Mark Stille

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472811240

Category: History

Page: 96

View: 7003

For the British Empire it was a military disaster, but for Imperial Japan the conquest of Malaya was one of the pivotal campaigns of World War II. Giving birth to the myth of the Imperial Japanese Army's invincibility, the victory left both Burma and India open to invasion. Although heavily outnumbered, the Japanese Army fought fiercely to overcome the inept and shambolic defence offered by the British and Commonwealth forces. Detailed analysis of the conflict, combined with a heavy focus on the significance of the aerial campaign, help tell the fascinating story of the Japanese victory, from the initial landings in Thailand and Malaya through to the destruction of the Royal Navy's Force Z and the final fall of Singapore itself.
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ÒThe Most Dangerous Moment of the WarÓ

JapanÕs Attack on the Indian Ocean, 1942

Author: John Clancy

Publisher: Casemate

ISBN: 1612003354

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 5240

In early April 1942, a little-known episode of World War II took place, said by Sir Winston Churchill to be Òthe most dangerous moment of the war,Ó when the Japanese made their only major offensive westwards into the Indian Ocean. Historian Sir Arthur Bryant said, ÒA Japanese naval victory in April 1942 would have given Japan total control of the Indian Ocean, isolated the Middle East and brought down the Churchill government.Ó War in the Far East had erupted with the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, followed in succession by Japanese drives on the Philippines, Indochina, the Java Sea and Singapore. Seemingly unstoppable, the Japanese now had a vast new empire, and having crippled the American fleet at Pearl Harbor, turned their sights on the British Eastern Fleet based at Ceylon. Occupation of Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) would not only provide the Japanese a springboard into India but control of the essential convoy routes to Europe and the Western Desert. And aside from the British Eastern Fleet, the Indian Ocean lay undefended. So far the Japanese had suffered no significant losses and the question on everyoneÕs lips was how soon the enemy would appear off India. In April 1942 a Japanese fleet led by six aircraft carriers, four battleships and 30 other ships sailed into the Bay of Bengal. After the war Churchill said that potential disaster was averted by the actions of one pilot, Squadron Leader L.J. Birchall, who in his Catalina flying boat spotted the Japanese warships massing some 350 miles from Ceylon. He was shot down by a Japanese Zero but not before sending a brief radio message back to his base. This gave the islandÕs defense forces time to prepare. In the ferocious battles that followed, the British lost a carrier, two heavy cruisers and many other ships; however, the Japanese eventually turned back, never to sail against India again. John Clancy, whose father survived the sinking of HMS Cornwall during the battle, tells the story of this dramatic but little known campaign in which a major Allied catastrophe was only narrowly averted.
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Beans, Bullets, and Black Oil - The Story of Fleet Logistics Afloat in the Pacific During World War II

Author: Rear Adm. Worrall Reed Carter

Publisher: Pickle Partners Publishing

ISBN: 1786252295

Category: History

Page: 433

View: 9501

Includes over 150 photos. Victory is won or lost in battle, but all military history shows that adequate logistic support is essential to the winning of battles. In World War II, logistic support of the fleet in the Pacific became a problem of such magnitude and diversity, as well as vital necessity, that all operations against Japan hinged upon it. The advance against the enemy moved our fleet progressively farther and farther away from the west coast of the United States, from Pearl Harbor, and from other sources of supply, to support our fleet we constructed temporary bases for various uses, and we formed floating mobile service squadrons and other logistic support groups. These floating organizations remained near the fighting fleet, supplying food, ammunition, and other necessities while rendering repair services close to the combat areas, this support enabled the fleet to keep unrelenting pressure upon the enemy by obviating the return of the fleet to home bases. Because of the knowledge gained during his South Pacific service and particularly from his experience as Commander of Service Squadron Ten, the largest of the mobile squadrons, Rear Admiral W.R. Carter was chosen to write this history of logistics afloat in the Pacific. The opinions expressed and the conclusions reached are those of the author.- Secretary of the Navy, Dan Kimball
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