Reimagining Journalism in a Post-Truth World: How Late-Night Comedians, Internet Trolls, and Savvy Reporters Are Transforming News

Author: Ed Madison,Ben DeJarnette

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1440854769

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 193

View: 6287

In a world of "alternative facts" and "post-truth" politics, producing public-interest journalism is more important than ever—but also more complex. This book examines how journalism is evolving to meet the demands of the digital media ecosystem, where lies often spread faster than truth, and where modern news consumers increasingly expect journalism to be a conversation, not a lecture. • Examines the historical roots of journalism's crisis while pushing the conversation toward promising experiments and solutions • Offers insights from digital-era disruptors and innovators, as well as long-time veterans of the news business • Provides context for the 2016 election's "fake news" phenomenon and explains—in clear and compelling prose—what savvy journalists are doing to rebuild trust in the real thing
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Living the Stories We Create

Preparing Students for the Digital Age

Author: Ellen McCabe

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319957988

Category: Education

Page: 130

View: 3542

This work explores the potential of digital media to rectify the disparity between formal learning contexts and contemporary perceptions and expectations of narrative. How can education systems respond to the changing technological landscape, thus preparing students to become active participants in society as well as to realise the extent of their own potential? This book explores such concepts in the classroom environment through direct engagement with students and teachers with the case of Shakespeare's Macbeth. Written in approximately 1606, Macbeth has its roots in a culture of orality and yet has sustained through centuries of print dominance. Indeed, as both text and performance the work itself embodies both the literary and the oral. Yet as a staple of many second level curricula increasingly Macbeth is perceived as an educational text. Macbeth reflects its cultural moment, an age of ambiguity where much like today notions of selfhood, privacy, societal structures, media and economy were being called into question. Thus Macbeth can be understood as a microcosm of the challenges existing in contemporary education in both content and form. This book examines Macbeth as a case-study in seeking to explore the implications of digital media for learning, as well as its possible potential to constructively facilitate in realigning formal learning contexts to contemporary experiences of narrative.
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Clueless in Academe

How Schooling Obscures the Life of the Mind

Author: Gerald Graff

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300132018

Category: Education

Page: 320

View: 2910

Gerald Graff argues that our schools and colleges make the intellectual life seem more opaque, narrowly specialized, and beyond normal learning capacities than it is or needs to be. Left clueless in the academic world, many students view the life of the mind as a secret society for which only an elite few qualify. In a refreshing departure from standard diatribes against academia, Graff shows how academic unintelligibility is unwittingly reinforced not only by academic jargon and obscure writing, but by the disconnection of the curriculum and the failure to exploit the many connections between academia and popular culture. Finally, Graff offers a wealth of practical suggestions for making the culture of ideas and arguments more accessible to students, showing how students can enter the public debates that permeate their lives.
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What Would Google Do?

Reverse-Engineering the Fastest Growing Company in the History of the World

Author: Jeff Jarvis

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0061709697

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 288

View: 2399

In a book that’s one part prophecy, one part thought experiment, one part manifesto, and one part survival manual, internet impresario and blogging pioneer Jeff Jarvis reverse-engineers Google, the fastest-growing company in history, to discover forty clear and straightforward rules to manage and live by. At the same time, he illuminates the new worldview of the internet generation: how it challenges and destroys—but also opens up—vast new opportunities. His findings are counterintuitive, imaginative, practical, and above all visionary, giving readers a glimpse of how everyone and everything—from corporations to governments, nations to individuals—must evolve in the Google era. What Would Google Do? is an astonishing, mind-opening book that, in the end, is not about Google. It’s about you.
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Niche Envy

Author: Joseph Turow

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 026226496X

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 240

View: 1847

We have all been to Web sites that welcome us by name, offering us discounts, deals, or special access to content. For the most part, it feels good to be wanted--to be valued as a customer. But if we thought about it, we might realize that we've paid for this special status by turning over personal information to a company's database. And we might wonder whether other customers get the same deals we get, or something even better. We might even feel stirrings of resentment toward customers more valued than we are. In Niche Envy, Joseph Turow examines the emergence of databases as marketing tools and the implications this may have for media, advertising, and society. If the new goal of marketing is to customize commercial announcements according to a buyer's preferences and spending history--or even by race, gender, and political opinions--what does this mean for the twentieth-century tradition of equal access to product information, and how does it affect civic life?Turow shows that these marketing techniques are not wholly new; they have roots in direct marketing and product placement, widely used decades ago and recently revived and reimagined by advertisers as part of "customer relationship management" (known popularly as CRM). He traces the transformation of marketing techniques online, on television, and in retail stores. And he describes public reaction against database marketing--pop-up blockers, spam filters, commercial-skipping video recorders, and other ad-evasion methods. Polls show that the public is nervous about giving up personal data. Meanwhile, companies try to persuade the most desirable customers to trust them with their information in return for benefits. Niche Envy tracks the marketing logic that got us to this uneasy impasse.
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Islamophobia/Islamophilia

Beyond the Politics of Enemy and Friend

Author: Andrew Shryock

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 0253004543

Category: Social Science

Page: 260

View: 1672

"Islamophobia" is a term that has been widely applied to anti-Muslim ideas and actions, especially since 9/11. The contributors to this provocative volume explore and critique the usefulness of the concept for understanding contexts ranging from the Middle Ages to the modern day. Moving beyond familiar explanations such as good Muslim/bad Muslim stereotypes or the "clash of civilizations," they describe Islamophobia's counterpart, Islamophilia, which deploys similar oppositions in the interest of fostering public acceptance of Islam. Contributors address topics such as conflicts over Islam outside and within Muslim communities in North America, Europe, the Middle East, and South Asia; the cultural politics of literature, humor, and urban renewal; and religious conversion to Islam.
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Engaged Journalism

Connecting with Digitally Empowered News Audiences

Author: Jake Batsell

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231538677

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 208

View: 9835

Engaged Journalism explores the changing relationship between news producers and audiences and the methods journalists can use to secure the attention of news consumers. Based on Jake Batsell's extensive experience and interaction with more than twenty innovative newsrooms, this book shows that, even as news organizations are losing their agenda-setting power, journalists can still thrive by connecting with audiences through online technology and personal interaction. Batsell conducts interviews with and observes more than two dozen traditional and startup newsrooms across the United States and the United Kingdom. Traveling to Seattle, London, New York City, and Kalamazoo, Michigan, among other locales, he attends newsroom meetings, combs through internal documents, and talks with loyal readers and online users to document the successes and failures of the industry's experiments with paywalls, subscriptions, nonprofit news, live events, and digital tools including social media, data-driven interactives, news games, and comment forums. He ultimately concludes that, for news providers to survive, they must constantly listen to, interact with, and fulfill the specific needs of their audiences, whose attention can no longer be taken for granted. Toward that end, Batsell proposes a set of best practices based on effective, sustainable journalistic engagement.
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Well Played 3.0

Video Games, Value and Meaning

Author: Et Al

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 1257858459

Category: Education

Page: 346

View: 721

Following on Well Played 1.0 and 2.0, this book will also be full of in-depth close readings of video games that parse out the various meanings to be found in the experience of playing a game. Contributors will analyze sequences in a game in detail in order to illustrate and interpret how the various components of a game can come together to create fulfilling a playing experience unique to this medium. Contributors will again be looking at video games, some that were covered in Well Played 1.0 and 2.0 as well as new ones, in order to provide a variety of perspectives on more great games.
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The Social Media Reader

Author: Michael Mandiberg

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814764053

Category: Computers

Page: 289

View: 5057

With the rise of web 2.0 and social media platforms taking over vast tracts of territory on the internet, the media landscape has shifted drastically in the past 20 years, transforming previously stable relationships between media creators and consumers. The Social Media Reader is the first collection to address the collective transformation with pieces on social media, peer production, copyright politics, and other aspects of contemporary internet culture from all the major thinkers in the field. Culling a broad range and incorporating different styles of scholarship from foundational pieces and published articles to unpublished pieces, journalistic accounts, personal narratives from blogs, and whitepapers, The Social Media Reader promises to be an essential text, with contributions from Lawrence Lessig, Henry Jenkins, Clay Shirky, Tim O'Reilly, Chris Anderson, Yochai Benkler, danah boyd, and Fred von Loehmann, to name a few. It covers a wide-ranging topical terrain, much like the internet itself, with particular emphasis on collaboration and sharing, the politics of social media and social networking, Free Culture and copyright politics, and labor and ownership. Theorizing new models of collaboration, identity, commerce, copyright, ownership, and labor, these essays outline possibilities for cultural democracy that arise when the formerly passive audience becomes active cultural creators, while warning of the dystopian potential of new forms of surveillance and control.
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Media Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Author: Michelle Ferrier,Dr Elizabeth Mays, Ph.D.

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781989014004

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 9890

Media Innovation & Entrepreneurship is an open, collaboratively written and edited volume designed to fill the needs of a growing number of journalism and mass communications programs in the U.S. that are teaching media entrepreneurship, media innovation, and the business of journalism to undergraduate and graduate students.
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It's Complicated

The Social Lives of Networked Teens

Author: danah boyd

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300166311

Category: Computers

Page: 281

View: 5555

Surveys the online social habits of American teens and analyzes the role technology and social media plays in their lives, examining common misconceptions about such topics as identity, privacy, danger, and bullying.
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Social Media for Journalists

Principles and Practice

Author: Megan Knight,Clare Cook

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 1446291197

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 288

View: 3780

"Untangles the jargon and sets out the route-map for how the social network can enable us to become major contributors to the multiplatform digital age. The right message, the right time - this is the right book for taking advantage of it all." - Jon Snow, Channel 4 News The essential guide to understanding and harnessing the tools of journalism today, Meagan Knight and Clare Cook show you how to master the enduring rules of good practice and the new techniques of social media. The book gives a thorough guide to principles and practice, including: How to find, write and break stories with social media An online journalism toolkit to get you started Using crowdsourcing to find and follow stories Getting on top of user-generated content The ins and outs of copyright and ethics Building your brand and making money The new economy of journalism and how to get ahead. More than a simple 'how-to' guide, this book takes you to the next level with its integration of theory and practice. It is a one-stop guide for students and practitioners of journalism.
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Words Without Pictures

Author: Charlotte Cotton,Alex Klein

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781597111423

Category: Photography

Page: 501

View: 6070

Words Without Pictures was originally conceived of by curator Charlotte Cotton as a means of creating spaces for thoughtful and urgent discourse around current issues in photography. Every month for a year, beginning in November 2007, an artist, educator, critic, art historian, or curator was invited to contribute a short, un-illustrated, and opinionated essay about an aspect of photography that, in his or her view, was either emerging or in the process of being rephrased. Each piece was available on the Words Without Pictures website for one month and was accompanied by a discussion forum focused on its specific topic. Over the course of its month-long life, each essay received both invited and unsolicited responses from a wide range of interested partiesstudents, photographers active in the commercial sector, bloggers, critics, historians, artists of all kinds, educators, publishers, and photography enthusiasts alikeall coming together to consider the issues at hand. All of these essays, responses, and other provocations are gathered together in a volume designed by David Reinfurt of Dexter Sinister. Previously issued as a print-on-demand title, Aperture is pleased to present Words Without Pictures to the trade for this first time as part of the Aperture Ideas series.
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Media & Culture

Mass Communication in a Digital Age

Author: Richard Campbell,Christopher R. Martin,Bettina Fabos

Publisher: Macmillan Higher Education

ISBN: 1319010431

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 672

View: 7380

A number of high stakes conflicts — over net neutrality, streaming music, copyrights, the shifting fortunes of various media outlets, and divisive politics — continue to unfold over YouTube, Twitter, TV screens, and other mediated feeds. The speed at which these stories are consumed means that understanding the complex connections between the media and our culture is more important than ever. The new tenth edition of Media & Culture starts with the digital world students know and then goes further, focusing on what these constant changes mean to them. As always, Media & Culture brings together industry expertise, media history, and current trends for an exhilarating look at the media right now. Through new infographics, cross-reference pages, and a new digital jobs feature, this edition offers the most contemporary and compelling examinations yet of how the media industries connect, interlock, and converge.
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CeDEM17

proceedings of the International Conference for E-Democracy and Open Government 2017, 17-19 May 2017 Danube University Krems, Austria

Author: Parycek, Peter,Edelmann, Noella

Publisher: Edition Donau-Universität Krems

ISBN: 3903150010

Category:

Page: 180

View: 4566

The Conference for E-Democracy and Open Government (CeDEM) brings together experts from academia, public authorities, developers and practitioners. The CeDEM proceedings present the essence of academic and practical knowledge on e-democracy and open government. The peer-reviewed academic papers, the reflections, the workshops and the PhD summaries found in these proceedings reveal the newest developments, trends, tools and procedures, and show the many ways that these impact society and democracy.
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Moral Claims in the Age of Spectacles

Shaping the Social Imaginary

Author: Brian M. Lowe

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 113750241X

Category: Social Science

Page: 323

View: 1346

This volume considers the rise of a new mode of creating, spreading, and encountering moral claims and ideas as they are expressed within spectacles. Brian M. Lowe explains how spectacles emerge when we are saturated with mediated representations—including pictures, texts, and videos—and exposed to television and movies and the myriad stories they tell us. The question of which moral issues gain our attention and which are neglected increasingly relates to how societal concerns are supported—or obscured—by spectacles. This project explores how this new form of moral understanding came to be. Through a series of case studies, including the use of radio and comic books; the crafting of Russian national identity through art; television and film; the evolution of human rights law through film and journalism; and the promotion of animal rights campaigns, this book unveils some of the ways in which our spectacular environment shapes moral understanding, and is in turn shaped by spectacle.
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Interactive Digital Narrative

History, Theory and Practice

Author: Hartmut Koenitz,Gabriele Ferri,Mads Haahr,Di?dem Sezen,Tonguç ?brahim Sezen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317668677

Category: Social Science

Page: 286

View: 6149

The book is concerned with narrative in digital media that changes according to user input—Interactive Digital Narrative (IDN). It provides a broad overview of current issues and future directions in this multi-disciplinary field that includes humanities-based and computational perspectives. It assembles the voices of leading researchers and practitioners like Janet Murray, Marie-Laure Ryan, Scott Rettberg and Martin Rieser. In three sections, it covers history, theoretical perspectives and varieties of practice including narrative game design, with a special focus on changes in the power relationship between audience and author enabled by interactivity. After discussing the historical development of diverse forms, the book presents theoretical standpoints including a semiotic perspective, a proposal for a specific theoretical framework and an inquiry into the role of artificial intelligence. Finally, it analyses varieties of current practice from digital poetry to location-based applications, artistic experiments and expanded remakes of older narrative game titles.
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The Death and Life of American Journalism

The Media Revolution That Will Begin the World Again

Author: Robert W McChesney,John Nichols

Publisher: Nation Books

ISBN: 1568587007

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 352

View: 7737

American journalism is collapsing as newspapers and magazines fail and scores of reporters are laid off across the country. Conventional wisdom says the Internet is to blame, but veteran journalists and media critics Robert W. McChesney and John Nichols disagree. The crisis of American journalism predates the Great Recession and digital media boom. What we are witnessing now is the end of the commercial news model and the opportune moment for the creation of a new system of independent journalism, one subsidized by the public and capable of safeguarding our democracy.
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The Spectre of Comparisons

Nationalism, Southeast Asia, and the World

Author: Benedict Richard O'Gorman Anderson

Publisher: Verso

ISBN: 9781859841846

Category: History

Page: 374

View: 1268

A controversial collection from the author of the celebrated Imagined Communities. While Benedict Anderson is best known for his classic book on nationalism, Imagined Communities, many of his most telling and incisive interventions have been made in his essays. Those collected in this new book span a range of subjects: from Aquino's Philippines, where the horses on the haciendas ate better than the stable-hands, to political assassination in contemporary Thailand, where government posts have become so lucrative that to gain them candidates will kill their rivals. In these writing, the subtle imbrication of politics, national imaginings, bureaucracy, modernization and its agents (particularly print culture) is brought out in all its complexity and richness. "The spectre of comparisons" was a phrase used by the celebrated Filipino nationalist and novelist Jose Rizal (1861-96), whose work and fate in the national imagination are discussed in these pages. In his finely wrought observations on Southeast Asian societies, Anderson raises deep questions concerning this spectre, about how, for instance, Manila is changed when it can no longer be seen through a comparison with European capitals, and how, more broadly, nationalism is produce by the process of increasing global connection. The Spectre of Comparisons is an indispensable resource for those interested in South-East Asia. But it also contains important theoretical and historical considerations about nationalism, national literature and memory, modernization, and the prospects for the Left in what Anderson dubs 'The New World Disorder'.
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