Refugees from Nazi Germany and the Liberal European States

Author: Frank Caestecker,Bob Moore

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9781845455873

Category: History

Page: 346

View: 8682

"The exodus of refugees from Nazi Germany in the 1930s has received far more attention from historians, social scientists, and demographers than many other migrations and persecutions in Europe. However, as a result of the overwhelming attention that has been given to the Holocaust within the historiography of Europe and the Second World War, the issues surrounding the flight of people from Nazi Germany prior to 1939 have been seen as Vorgeschichte (pre-history) ... Based on a comparative analysis of national case studies, this volume deals with the challenges that the pre-1939 movement of refugees from Germany and Austria posed to the immigration controls in the countries of interwar Europe"--Publisher's description.
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The Oxford Handbook of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies

Author: Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh,Gil Loescher,Katy Long,Nando Sigona

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191645885

Category: Political Science

Page: 800

View: 2065

Refugee and Forced Migration Studies has grown from being a concern of a relatively small number of scholars and policy researchers in the 1980s to a global field of interest with thousands of students worldwide studying displacement either from traditional disciplinary perspectives or as a core component of newer programmes across the Humanities and Social and Political Sciences. Today the field encompasses both rigorous academic research which may or may not ultimately inform policy and practice, as well as action-research focused on advocating in favour of refugees' needs and rights. This authoritative Handbook critically evaluates the birth and development of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies, and analyses the key contemporary and future challenges faced by academics and practitioners working with and for forcibly displaced populations around the world. The 52 state-of-the-art chapters, written by leading academics, practitioners, and policymakers working in universities, research centres, think tanks, NGOs and international organizations, provide a comprehensive and cutting-edge overview of the key intellectual, political, social and institutional challenges arising from mass displacement in the world today. The chapters vividly illustrate the vibrant and engaging debates that characterise this rapidly expanding field of research and practice.
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The Forgotten Kindertransportees

The Scottish Experience

Author: Frances Williams

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1780937180

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 4806

The Forgotten Kindertransportees offers a compelling new exploration of the Kindertransport episode in Britain. The Kindertransport brought close to 10,000 unaccompanied children and young people to Britain on a trans-migrant basis between 1938 and 1939, with an estimated 70% of these children being of the Jewish faith. The outbreak of the Second World War turned this short-term initiative into a longer-term episode and Britain became home to the thousands that had been forced to migrate across the continent to flee the Nazis and the tragic Holocaust that would take place. This book re-evaluates and challenges misconceptions about the Kindertransportees' experiences in Britain - misconceptions that currently pervade Kindertransport scholarship. It focuses on the particularity of the Scottish experience, scrutinising misleading national pictures, which have dominated existing literature and excluded this important part of the Kindertransport episode. An estimated 8% of Kindertransportees were cared for in Scotland for the duration of the war years and this book demonstrates how national agendas were put into practice in a region that was far removed from the administrative and bureaucratic hub of London. The Forgotten Kindertransportees provides original interpretations as it considers a number of important aspects of the Kindertransportees' experiences in Scotland, including those of a social, political and religious nature.This includes an examination of Scotland's philanthropic welfare solutions for the dependent trans-migrant minor, the role of Zionism and the impact of Scottish-Jewry's particular approach to Judaism and a Jewish lifestyle upon broader life stories of Kindertransportees. Using a vast body of new research material, Frances Williams provides a fascinating and detailed examination of the Kindertransport that is region-specific and one that is all the more important because of its specificity. This is an important text for anyone interested in the Holocaust and the social history of those involved.
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Identification and Registration Practices in Transnational Perspective

People, Papers and Practices

Author: J. Brown,I. About,G. Lonergan

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137367318

Category: Political Science

Page: 344

View: 9926

This collection examines the subject of identification and surveillance from 16th C English parish registers to 21st C DNA databases. The contributors, who range from historians to legal specialists, provide an insight into the historical development behind such issues as biometric identification, immigration control and personal data use.
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The Home Front in Britain

Images, Myths and Forgotten Experiences since 1914

Author: Janis Lomas

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137348992

Category: History

Page: 246

View: 1101

The Home Front in Britain explores the British Home Front in the last 100 years since the outbreak of WW1. Case studies critically analyse the meaning and images of the British home and family in times war, challenging prevalent myths of how working and domestic life was shifted by national conflict.
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Standing on the Shoulders of Fascism

From Immigration Control to the Strong State

Author: Steve Cohen

Publisher: Trentham Books Limited

ISBN: N.A

Category: Asylum, Right of

Page: 189

View: 4178

The state is always in a sense authoritarian - it is just that the forms of authority change. But since New Labour came to power in 1997 the state apparatus has been significantly strengthened. Identity cards, the so-called anti-terrorist legislation and the development of Anti Social Behaviour Orders as a form of social control are all manifestations of the move to a strong state. And this has been accompanied by a plethora of further immigration restrictions - of which the 2005 Immigration, Asylum and Nationality Bill is the latest instance. Steve Cohen argues that there is a linear ideological and political connection between a century of immigration controls and the formation of the Blairite strong state, and that the popular acceptance of the brutality and repression of immigration controls has been part of the softening up process that enables other authoritarian legislation to be enacted. But he goes beyond this equation to draw another: between immigration controls and fascistic activity. He shows how immigration controls are unique in that at two critical periods (controls against Jews and then against black people) it was organised fascism that forced the law into being. New pieces are interspersed with a few old - and hard to find - essays. Together, they offer a critical examination of the history, law and politics of immigration controls - including resistance to controls - in the UK and internationally today.
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The Abandonment of the Jews

America and the Holocaust, 1941-1945

Author: David S. Wyman

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 458

View: 5677

New paperback edition of a landmark work that remains the definitive book on America's response to the Holocaust. In addition to a new cover design and Elie Wiesel's original foreword to the 1984 edition - and his 1998 afterword - this edition includes a new preface by the author discussing recent scholarship on the American response to the Holocaust.
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Alien Policy in Belgium, 1840-1940

The Creation of Guest Workers, Refugees and Illegal Aliens

Author: Frank Caestecker

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9781571819864

Category: History

Page: 330

View: 5242

Belgium has a unique place in the history of migration in that it was the first among industrialized nations in Continental Europe to develop into an immigrant society. In the nineteenth century Italians, Jews, Poles, Czechs, and North Africans settled in Belgium to work in industry and commerce. They were followed by Russians in the 1920s and Germans in the 1930s who were seeking a safe haven from persecution by totalitarian regimes. In the nineteenth century immigrants were to a larger extent integrated into Belgian society: they were denied political rights but participated on equal terms with Belgians in social life. This changed radically in the twentieth century; by 1940 the rights of aliens were severely curtailed, while those of Belgian citizens, in particular in the social domain, were extended. While the state evolved into a "welfare state" for its citizens it became more of a police state for immigrants. The state only tolerated immigrants who were prepared to carry out those jobs that were shunned by the Belgians. Under the pressure of public opinion, an exception was made in the cases of thousands of Jewish refugees that had fled from Nazi Germany. However, other immigrants were subjected to harsh regulations and in fact became the outcasts of twentieth-century Belgian liberal society. This remarkable study examines in depth and over a long time span how (anti-) alien policies were transformed, resulting in an illiberal exclusion of foreigners at the same time as democratization and the welfare state expanded. In this respect Belgium is certainly not unique but offers an interesting case study of developments that are characteristic for Europe as a whole. Frank Caesteckeris senior researcher at the University of Ghent, Department of Modern and Contemporary History.
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Dominican Haven

The Jewish Refugee Settlement in Sosúa, 1940-1945

Author: Marion A. Kaplan

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 255

View: 1616

This is the story of a small group of Jews, who, fleeing for their lives from Nazi persecution, found a welcoming haven in the Dominican Republic. The settlers arrived amid lush, tropical vegetation and could only describe this refuge as paradise. But they faced daunting problems. Middle-class, urban Europeans, they needed to learn a new language and acquire new skills while adjusting to a new climate and worrying about loved ones left behind in Europe. They created a Jewish community with a synagogue, built a school, and a thriving dairy industry, working side by side with Dominicans in an atmosphere that was distinguished by its lack of Anti-Semitism.
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Secret Reports on Nazi Germany

The Frankfurt School Contribution to the War Effort

Author: Franz Neumann,Herbert Marcuse,Otto Kirchheimer

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400846463

Category: History

Page: 704

View: 3775

During the Second World War, three prominent members of the Frankfurt School--Franz Neumann, Herbert Marcuse, and Otto Kirchheimer--worked as intelligence analysts for the Office of Strategic Services, the wartime forerunner of the CIA. This book brings together their most important intelligence reports on Nazi Germany, most of them published here for the first time. These reports provide a fresh perspective on Hitler's regime and the Second World War, and a fascinating window on Frankfurt School critical theory. They develop a detailed analysis of Nazism as a social and economic system and the role of anti-Semitism in Nazism, as well as a coherent plan for the reconstruction of postwar Germany as a democratic political system with a socialist economy. These reports played a significant role in the development of postwar Allied policy, including denazification and the preparation of the Nuremberg Trials. They also reveal how wartime intelligence analysis shaped the intellectual agendas of these three important German-Jewish scholars who fled Nazi persecution prior to the war. Secret Reports on Nazi Germany features a foreword by Raymond Geuss as well as a comprehensive general introduction by Raffaele Laudani that puts these writings in historical and intellectual context.
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Survivors

Jewish Self-Help and Rescue in Nazi-Occupied Western Europe

Author: Bob Moore

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 1012

The first comprehensive study of Jewish survival in western Europe in all its forms during the Holocaust.
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Nazi Europe and the Final Solution

Author: David Bankier,Israel Gutman

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9781845454104

Category: History

Page: 572

View: 1612

It was in Europe that the Cold War reached a decisive turning point in the 1960s, leading to the era of détente. The Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE), with its Final Act in Helsinki in August 1975, led to a rapprochement between East and West in the fields of security, economy and culture. This volume offers a pilot study in what the authors perceive as the key issues within this process: an understanding over the ‘German problem’ (balancing the recognition of the post-war territorial status quo against a formula for the eventuality of a peaceful change of frontiers) and the Western strategy of transformation through a multiplication of contacts between the two blocs. Both of these arguments emerged from the findings of an international research project on ‘Détente and CSCE in Europe, 1966-1975’, funded by the Volkswagen Stiftung and headed by the two editors.
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Reconciling Canada

Critical Perspectives on the Culture of Redress

Author: Jennifer Henderson,Pauline Wakeham

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442611685

Category: Social Science

Page: 480

View: 7982

Truth and reconciliation commissions and official governmental apologies continue to surface worldwide as mechanisms for coming to terms with human rights violations and social atrocities. As the first scholarly collection to explore the intersections and differences between a range of redress cases that have emerged in Canada in recent decades, Reconciling Canada provides readers with the contexts for understanding the phenomenon of reconciliation as it has played out in this multicultural settler state. In this volume, leading scholars in the humanities and social sciences relate contemporary political and social efforts to redress wrongs to the fraught history of government relations with Aboriginal and diasporic populations. The contributors offer ground-breaking perspectives on Canada's 'culture of redress,' broaching questions of law and constitutional change, political coalitions, commemoration, testimony, and literatures of injury and its aftermath. Also assembled together for the first time is a collection of primary documents – including government reports, parliamentary debates, and redress movement statements – prefaced with contextual information. Reconciling Canada provides a vital and immensely relevant illumination of the dynamics of reconciliation, apology, and redress in contemporary Canada.
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The End of Europe

Dictators, Demagogues, and the Coming Dark Age

Author: James Kirchick

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300227787

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 1564

Once the world’s bastion of liberal, democratic values, Europe is now having to confront demons it thought it had laid to rest. The old pathologies of anti-Semitism, populist nationalism, and territorial aggression are threatening to tear the European postwar consensus apart. In riveting dispatches from this unfolding tragedy, James Kirchick shows us the shallow disingenuousness of the leaders who pushed for “Brexit;” examines how a vast migrant wave is exacerbating tensions between Europeans and their Muslim minorities; explores the rising anti-Semitism that causes Jewish schools and synagogues in France and Germany to resemble armed bunkers; and describes how Russian imperial ambitions are destabilizing nations from Estonia to Ukraine. With President Trump now threatening to abandon America's traditional role as upholder of the liberal world order and guarantor of the continent's security, Europe may be alone in dealing with these unprecedented challenges. Based on extensive firsthand reporting, this book is a provocative, disturbing look at a continent in unexpected crisis.
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The Origins of the Second World War in Europe

Author: P. M. H. Bell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317865243

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 6798

PMH Bell's famous book is a comprehensive study of the period and debates surrounding the European origins of the Second World War. He approaches the subject from three different angles: describing the various explanations that have been offered for the war and the historiographical debates that have arisen from them, analysing the ideological, economic and strategic forces at work in Europe during the 1930s, and tracing the course of events from peace in 1932, via the initial outbreak of hostilities in 1939, through to the climactic German attack on the Soviet Union in 1941 which marked the descent into general conflict. Written in a lucid, accessible style, this is an indispensable guide to the complex origins of the Second World War.
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The Catholic Church and the Jews

Argentina, 1933-1945

Author: Graciela Ben-Dror

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803220448

Category: History

Page: 266

View: 1774

The impact of events in Nazi Germany and Europe during World War II was keenly felt in neutral Argentina among its predominantly Catholic population and its significant Jewish minority. The Catholic Church and the Jews, Argentina, 1933-1945 considers the images of Jews presented in standard Catholic teaching of that era, the attitudes of the lower clergy and faithful toward the country s Jewish citizens, and the response of the politically influential Church hierarchy to the national debate on accepting Jewish refugees from Europe. The issue was complicated by such factors as the position taken by the Vatican, Argentina s unstable political situation, and the sizeable number of citizens of German origin who were Nazi sympathizers eager to promote German interests. Argentina s self-perception was as a Catholic country. Though there were few overtly anti-Jewish acts, traditional stereotypes and prejudice were widespread and only a few voices in the Catholic community confronted the established attitudes.
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The Fruits of Exile

Central European Intellectual Immigration to America in the Age of Fascism

Author: Richard Bodek,Simon Lewis

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 230

View: 7861

The Fruits of Exile casts new light on the history of Jewish A(c)migrA(c) thinkers escaping from the rise of fascism in Central Europe. Editors Richard Bodek and Simon Lewis, along with an international group of contributors, emphasize the contributions to American and British culture by the European intellectual diaspora of the 1930s through their careful study of artists, scientists, and cultural figures often ignored in previous studies of the era.
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Dictators, Democracy, and American Public Culture

Envisioning the Totalitarian Enemy, 1920s-1950s

Author: Benjamin L. Alpers

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807861227

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 2119

Focusing on portrayals of Mussolini's Italy, Hitler's Germany, and Stalin's Russia in U.S. films, magazine and newspaper articles, books, plays, speeches, and other texts, Benjamin Alpers traces changing American understandings of dictatorship from the late 1920s through the early years of the Cold War. During the early 1930s, most Americans' conception of dictatorship focused on the dictator. Whether viewed as heroic or horrific, the dictator was represented as a figure of great, masculine power and effectiveness. As the Great Depression gripped the United States, a few people--including conservative members of the press and some Hollywood filmmakers--even dared to suggest that dictatorship might be the answer to America's social problems. In the late 1930s, American explanations of dictatorship shifted focus from individual leaders to the movements that empowered them. Totalitarianism became the image against which a view of democracy emphasizing tolerance and pluralism and disparaging mass movements developed. First used to describe dictatorships of both right and left, the term "totalitarianism" fell out of use upon the U.S. entry into World War II. With the war's end and the collapse of the U.S.-Soviet alliance, however, concerns about totalitarianism lay the foundation for the emerging Cold War.
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