Real Indians

Identity and the Survival of Native America

Author: Eva Garroutte

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520935921

Category: History

Page: 250

View: 4374

At the dawn of the twenty-first century, America finds itself on the brink of a new racial consciousness. The old, unquestioned confidence with which individuals can be classified (as embodied, for instance, in previous U.S. census categories) has been eroded. In its place are shifting paradigms and new norms for racial identity. Eva Marie Garroutte examines the changing processes of racial identification and their implications by looking specifically at the case of American Indians.
Release

American Indians and the Rhetoric of Removal and Allotment

Author: Jason Edward Black

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 1626744858

Category: History

Page: 228

View: 3763

Jason Edward Black examines the ways the US government’s rhetoric and American Indian responses contributed to the policies of Native-US relations throughout the nineteenth century’s removal and allotment eras. Black shows how these discourses together constructed the perception of the US government and of American Indian communities. Such interactions—though certainly not equal—illustrated the hybrid nature of Native-US rhetoric in the nineteenth century. Both governmental, colonizing discourse and indigenous, decolonizing discourse shaped arguments, constructions of identity, and rhetoric in the colonial relationship. American Indians and the Rhetoric of Removal and Allotment demonstrates how American Indians decolonized dominant rhetoric through impeding removal and allotment policies. By turning around the US government’s narrative and inventing their own tactics, American Indian communities helped restyle their own identities as well as the government’s. During the first third of the twentieth century, American Indians lobbied for the successful passage of the Indian Citizenship Act of 1924 and the Indian New Deal of 1934, changing the relationship once again. In the end, Native communities were granted increased rhetorical power through decolonization, though the US government retained an undeniable colonial influence through its territorial management of Natives. The Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian New Deal—as the conclusion of this book indicates—are emblematic of the prevalence of the duality of US citizenship that fused American Indians to the nation, yet segregated them on reservations. This duality of inclusion and exclusion grew incrementally and persists now, as a lasting effect of nineteenth-century Native-US rhetorical relations.
Release

Indigenous Peoples of North America

A Concise Anthropological Overview

Author: Robert J. Muckle

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442604166

Category: Social Science

Page: 208

View: 9546

Most books dealing with North American Indigenous peoples are exhaustive in coverage. They provide in-depth discussion of various culture areas which, while valuable, sometimes means that the big picture context is lost. This book offers a corrective to that trend by providing a concise, thematic overview of the key issues facing Indigenous peoples in North America, from prehistory to the present. It integrates a culture area analysis within a thematic approach, covering archaeology, traditional lifeways, the colonial era, and contemporary Indigenous culture. Muckle also explores the history of the relationship between Indigenous peoples and anthropologists with rigor and honesty. The result is a remarkably comprehensive book that provides a strong grounding for understanding Indigenous cultures in North America.
Release

Agamben and Colonialism

Author: Marcelo Svirsky

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748649263

Category: Philosophy

Page: 304

View: 5017

This collection of essays evaluates Agamben's work from a postcolonial perspective. Svirsky and Bignall assemble leading figures to explore the rich philosophical linkages and the political concerns shared by Agamben and postcolonial theory.
Release

"We Are Still Here"

American Indians Since 1890

Author: Peter Iverson,Wade Davies

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118751701

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 7723

In addition to revisions and updates, the second edition of“We Are Still Here” features new material,seeing this well-loved American History Series volume maintain itstreatment of American Indians in the 20th century whileextending its coverage into the opening decades of the21st century. Provides student and general readers concise and engagingcoverage of contemporary history of American Indians contributed bytop scholars and instructors in the field Represents an ideal supplement to any U.S. or Native Americansurvey text Includes a completely up-to-date synthesis of the most currentliterature in the field Features a comprehensive Bibliographical Essay that serves toaid student research and writing Covers American Indian history from 1890 through 2013
Release

Adolescent Identity

Evolutionary, Cultural and Developmental Perspectives

Author: Bonnie L. Hewlett

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136239677

Category: Social Science

Page: 346

View: 6615

As our world becomes increasingly permeable, and as human populations are rapidly converging and transitioning within a global interconnectedness, it is vital that we look to, and learn from, those most adept at the adaptation, creation, and contesting of culture: adolescents. This text is designed to bridge critical gaps in the understanding of the daily lives, identity development, and experiences of adolescents in diverse cultures around the world. Cultural context is predictive of developmental uniqueness; comparisons provide insights into how social structures and relationships influence the manifestation of individual patterns of development and experience. In quantitative and qualitative detail, the contributors relate the nature of adolescent life to cultural, biological, ecological, demographic, and social variables. The findings of this book will be relevant not only to other social anthropologists, but also to sociologists and developmental/educational psychologists.
Release

Fantasies of Identification

Disability, Gender, Race

Author: Ellen Samuels

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479821373

Category: Social Science

Page: 273

View: 8498

In the mid-nineteenth-century United States, as it became increasingly difficult to distinguish between bodies understood as black, white, or Indian; able-bodied or disabled; and male or female, intense efforts emerged to define these identities as biologically distinct and scientifically verifiable in a literally marked body. Combining literary analysis, legal history, and visual culture, Ellen Samuels traces the evolution of the “fantasy of identification”—the powerful belief that embodied social identities are fixed, verifiable, and visible through modern science. From birthmarks and fingerprints to blood quantum and DNA, she examines how this fantasy has circulated between cultural representations, law, science, and policy to become one of the most powerfully institutionalized ideologies of modern society. Yet, as Samuels demonstrates, in every case, the fantasy distorts its claimed scientific basis, substituting subjective language for claimed objective fact. From its early emergence in discourses about disability fakery and fugitive slaves in the nineteenth century to its most recent manifestation in the question of sex testing at the 2012 Olympic Games, Fantasies of Identification explores the roots of modern understandings of bodily identity.
Release

Recognition, Sovereignty Struggles, and Indigenous Rights in the United States

A Sourcebook

Author: Amy E. Den Ouden,Jean M. O'Brien

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469602172

Category: Social Science

Page: 376

View: 951

This engaging collection surveys and clarifies the complex issue of federal and state recognition for Native American tribal nations in the United States. Den Ouden and O'Brien gather focused and teachable essays on key topics, debates, and case studies. Written by leading scholars in the field, including historians, anthropologists, legal scholars, and political scientists, the essays cover the history of recognition, focus on recent legal and cultural processes, and examine contemporary recognition struggles nationwide. Contributors are Joanne Barker (Lenape), Kathleen A. Brown-Perez (Brothertown), Rosemary Cambra (Muwekma Ohlone), Amy E. Den Ouden, Timothy Q. Evans (Haliwa-Saponi), Les W. Field, Angela A. Gonzales (Hopi), Rae Gould (Nipmuc), J. Kehaulani Kauanui (Kanaka Maoli), K. Alexa Koenig, Alan Leventhal, Malinda Maynor Lowery (Lumbee), Jean M. O'Brien (White Earth Ojibwe), John Robinson, Jonathan Stein, Ruth Garby Torres (Schaghticoke), and David E. Wilkins (Lumbee).
Release

Colonial Entanglement

Constituting a Twenty-First-Century Osage Nation

Author: Jean Dennison

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 080783744X

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 9417

From 2004 to 2006 the Osage Nation conducted a contentious governmental reform process in which sharply differing visions arose over the new government's goals, the Nation's own history, and what it means to be Osage. The primary debates were focused on biology, culture, natural resources, and sovereignty. Osage anthropologist Jean Dennison documents the reform process in order to reveal the lasting effects of colonialism and to illuminate the possibilities for indigenous sovereignty. In doing so, she brings to light the many complexities of defining indigenous citizenship and governance in the twenty-first century. By situating the 2004-6 Osage Nation reform process within its historical and current contexts, Dennison illustrates how the Osage have creatively responded to continuing assaults on their nationhood. A fascinating account of a nation in the midst of its own remaking, Colonial Entanglement presents a sharp analysis of how legacies of European invasion and settlement in North America continue to affect indigenous people's views of selfhood and nationhood.
Release

Centering Anishinaabeg Studies

Understanding the World through Stories

Author: Jill Doerfler,Niigaanwewidam James Sinclair,Heidi Kiiwetinepinesiik Stark

Publisher: MSU Press

ISBN: 1609173538

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 446

View: 2541

For the Anishinaabeg people, who span a vast geographic region from the Great Lakes to the Plains and beyond, stories are vessels of knowledge. They are bagijiganan, offerings of the possibilities within Anishinaabeg life. Existing along a broad narrative spectrum, from aadizookaanag (traditional or sacred narratives) to dibaajimowinan (histories and news)—as well as everything in between—storytelling is one of the central practices and methods of individual and community existence. Stories create and understand, survive and endure, revitalize and persist. They honor the past, recognize the present, and provide visions of the future. In remembering, (re)making, and (re)writing stories, Anishinaabeg storytellers have forged a well-traveled path of agency, resistance, and resurgence. Respecting this tradition, this groundbreaking anthology features twenty-four contributors who utilize creative and critical approaches to propose that this people’s stories carry dynamic answers to questions posed within Anishinaabeg communities, nations, and the world at large. Examining a range of stories and storytellers across time and space, each contributor explores how narratives form a cultural, political, and historical foundation for Anishinaabeg Studies. Written by Anishinaabeg and non-Anishinaabeg scholars, storytellers, and activists, these essays draw upon the power of cultural expression to illustrate active and ongoing senses of Anishinaabeg life. They are new and dynamic bagijiganan, revealing a viable and sustainable center for Anishinaabeg Studies, what it has been, what it is, what it can be.
Release

Almost All Aliens

Immigration, Race, and Colonialism in American History and Identity

Author: Paul Spickard

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135950474

Category: History

Page: 744

View: 4807

Almost All Aliens offers a unique reinterpretation of immigration in the history of the United States. Leaving behind the traditional melting-pot model of immigrant assimilation, Paul Spickard puts forward a fresh and provocative reconceptualization that embraces the multicultural reality of immigration that has always existed in the United States. His astute study illustrates the complex relationship between ethnic identity and race, slavery, and colonial expansion. Examining not only the lives of those who crossed the Atlantic, but also those who crossed the Pacific, the Caribbean, and the North American Borderlands, Almost All Aliens provides a distinct, inclusive analysis of immigration and identity in the United States from 1600 until the present. For additional information and classroom resources please visit the Almost All Aliens companion website at www.routledge.com/textbooks/almostallaliens.
Release

Queering the Biopolitics of Citizenship in the Age of Obama

Author: J. Rohrer

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137488204

Category: Political Science

Page: 85

View: 9889

The book from the interdisciplinary fields of queer theory, critical race theory, feminist political theory, disability studies, and indigenous studies to demonstrate that analyzing contemporary notions of citizenship requires understanding the machinations of governmentality and biopolitics in the (re)production of the proper citizen.
Release

Kindred by Choice

Germans and American Indians since 1800

Author: H. Glenn Penny

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469607654

Category: History

Page: 392

View: 5889

How do we explain the persistent preoccupation with American Indians in Germany and the staggering numbers of Germans one encounters as visitors to Indian country? As H. Glenn Penny demonstrates, that preoccupation is rooted in an affinity for American Indians that has permeated German cultures for two centuries. This affinity stems directly from German polycentrism, notions of tribalism, a devotion to resistance, a longing for freedom, and a melancholy sense of shared fate. Locating the origins of the fascination for Indian life in the transatlantic world of German cultures in the nineteenth century, Penny explores German settler colonialism in the American Midwest, the rise and fall of German America, and the transnational worlds of American Indian performers. As he traces this phenomenon through the twentieth century, Penny engages debates about race, masculinity, comparative genocides, and American Indians' reactions to Germans' interests in them. He also assesses what persists of the affinity across the political ruptures of modern German history and challenges readers to rethink how cultural history is made.
Release

Manifesting America

The Imperial Construction of U.S. National Space

Author: Mark Rifkin

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199324018

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 290

View: 758

Manifesting America explores how Native American and Mexican American writers use various kinds of nonfiction to challenge the ideology of manifest destiny.
Release

Contesting Bodies and Nation in Canadian History

Author: Patrizia Gentile,Jane Nicholas

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442663162

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 5696

From fur coats to nude paintings, and from sports to beauty contests, the body has been central to the literal and figurative fashioning of ourselves as individuals and as a nation. In this first collection on the history of the body in Canada, an interdisciplinary group of scholars explores the multiple ways the body has served as a site of contestation in Canadian history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Showcasing a variety of methodological approaches, Contesting Bodies and Nation in Canadian History includes essays on many themes that engage with the larger historical relationship between the body and nation: medicine and health, fashion and consumer culture, citizenship and work, and more. The contributors reflect on the intersections of bodies with the concept of nationhood, as well as how understandings of the body are historically contingent. The volume is capped off with a critical introductory chapter by the editors on the history of bodies and the development of the body as a category of analysis.
Release

Gott ist rot

Author: Vine Deloria

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783889774590

Category:

Page: 191

View: 6957

Release

Unterwegs zum Buddha

sein Leben, seine Lehre, seine Wirkung

Author: Pankaj Mishra

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783896671349

Category:

Page: 444

View: 3191

Release

Native American Studies in Higher Education

Models for Collaboration Between Universities and Indigenous Nations

Author: Duane Champagne,Joseph H. Stauss

Publisher: Rowman Altamira

ISBN: 9780759101258

Category: Education

Page: 246

View: 9920

In this collection, Champagne and Stauss demonstrate how the rise of Native studies in American and Canadian universities exists as an extraordinary achievement in higher education. In the face of historically assimilationist agendas and institutional racism, collaborative programs continue to grow and promote the values and goals of sovereign tribal communities. In twelve case studies, the authors provide rich contextual histories of Native programs, discussing successes and failures and battles over curriculum content, funding, student retention, and community collaborations. It will be a valuable resource for Native American leaders, and educators in Native American studies, race and ethnic studies, comparative education, anthropology, higher education administration and educational policy.
Release

"Real" Indians and Others

Mixed-blood Urban Native Peoples and Indigenous Nationhood

Author: Bonita Lawrence

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803280373

Category: Social Science

Page: 303

View: 1724

Mixed-blood urban Native peoples in Canada are profoundly affected by federal legislation that divides Aboriginal peoples into different legal categories. In this pathfinding book, Bonita Lawrence reveals the ways in which mixed-blood urban Natives understand their identities and struggle to survive in a world that, more often than not, fails to recognize them. In ?Real? Indians and Others Lawrence draws on the first-person accounts of thirty Toronto residents of Native heritage, as well as archival materials, sociological research, and her own urban Native heritage and experiences. She sheds light on the Canadian government?s efforts to define Native identity through the years by means of the Indian Act and shows how residential schooling, the loss of official Indian status, and adoption have affected Native identity. Lawrence looks at how Natives with ?Indian status? react and respond to ?nonstatus? Natives and how federally recognized Native peoples attempt to impose an identity on urban Natives. Drawing on her interviews with urban Natives, she describes the devastating loss of community that has resulted from identity legislation and how urban Native peoples have wrestled with their past and current identities. Lawrence also addresses the future and explores the forms of nation building that can reconcile the differences in experiences and distinct agendas of urban and reserve-based Native communities.
Release