Quelch's Gold

Piracy, Greed, and Betrayal in Colonial New England

Author: Clifford Beal

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780275994075

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 242

View: 7888

In May 1704 an eighty-ton brigantine, the "Charles," quietly slipped into the cove at Marblehead, Massachusetts. Her sudden and unexpected appearance, some ten months after she had left Marblehead under mysterious circumstances, started tongues wagging down at the docks and in the town's dim, cramped, seafront taverns. During the following three weeks, a drama played out involving the crew of the "Charles"; her commander, John Quelch; and the colonial governments of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and New Hampshire. In the hold of the "Charles" lay large quantities of Brazilian sugar, hides, cloth, guns, and gold dust and coins worth more than 10,000 sterling--a huge fortune for the time. This booty and the circumstances of the ship's voyage led to Quelch's arrest on charges of piracy and murder against the subjects of Queen Anne's newest ally, the king of Portugal. One historian called Quelch's trial, the first admiralty trial ever held outside England, "the first case of judicial murder in America." Beyond the lure of the immediate charges, what drew folks to the Quelch case were the first stirrings of American rebellion against English rule, for the mob saw the high-handed treatment of Quelch as an attack on personal liberty and freedom. Whether pirate or privateer, Quelch suffered a travesty of justice, even by the legal standards of the time. His is a dramatic and tragic story about a man caught up in a political world he no longer understands. A legend persists that before they were captured, Quelch's crew buried some of their gold on Star Island off the New Hampshire coast. Every summer to this day the island has continued to attract treasure hunters searching for Quelch's gold. "Quelch's Gold" tells the story behind the legend.
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Piracy: Oxford Bibliographies Online Research Guide

Author: Oxford University Press

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780199808519

Category: History

Page: 22

View: 9640

This ebook is a selective guide designed to help scholars and students of the ancient world find reliable sources of information by directing them to the best available scholarly materials in whatever form or format they appear from books, chapters, and journal articles to online archives, electronic data sets, and blogs. Written by a leading international authority on the subject, the ebook provides bibliographic information supported by direct recommendations about which sources to consult and editorial commentary to make it clear how the cited sources are interrelated. This ebook is just one of many articles from Oxford Bibliographies Online: Atlantic History, a continuously updated and growing online resource designed to provide authoritative guidance through the scholarship and other materials relevant to the study of Atlantic History, the study of the transnational interconnections between Europe, North America, South America, and Africa, particularly in the early modern and colonial period. Oxford Bibliographies Online covers most subject disciplines within the social science and humanities, for more information visit www.oxfordbibliographies.com.
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Women and English Piracy, 1540-1720

Partners and Victims of Crime

Author: John C. Appleby

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer Ltd

ISBN: 1783270187

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 3072

Drawing on a wide body of evidence, the book argues that the support of women was vital to the persistence of piracy around the British Isles at least until the early seventeenth century. The emergence of long-distance and globalized predation had far reaching consequences for female agency.
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Pirate Nests and the Rise of the British Empire, 1570-1740

Author: Mark G. Hanna

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469617951

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 3564

Analyzing the rise and subsequent fall of international piracy from the perspective of colonial hinterlands, Mark G. Hanna explores the often overt support of sea marauders in maritime communities from the inception of England's burgeoning empire in the 1570s to its administrative consolidation by the 1740s. Although traditionally depicted as swashbuckling adventurers on the high seas, pirates played a crucial role on land. Far from a hindrance to trade, their enterprises contributed to commercial development and to the economic infrastructure of port towns. English piracy and unregulated privateering flourished in the Pacific, the Caribbean, and the Indian Ocean because of merchant elites' active support in the North American colonies. Sea marauders represented a real as well as a symbolic challenge to legal and commercial policies formulated by distant and ineffectual administrative bodies that undermined the financial prosperity and defense of the colonies. Departing from previous understandings of deep-sea marauding, this study reveals the full scope of pirates' activities in relation to the landed communities that they serviced and their impact on patterns of development that formed early America and the British Empire.
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Pirate Hunting

The Fight Against Pirates, Privateers, and Sea Raiders from Antiquity to the Present

Author: Benerson Little

Publisher: Potomac Books, Inc.

ISBN: 1597972916

Category: History

Page: 376

View: 8931

For thousands of years pirates, privateers, and seafaring raiders have terrorized the ocean voyager and coastal inhabitant, plundering ship and shore with impunity. From the victim's point of view, these attackers were not the rebellious, romantic rulers of Neptune's realm, but savage beasts to be eradicated, and those who went to sea to stop them were heroes. Engaging and meticulously detailed, Pirate Hunting chronicles the fight against these plunderers from ancient times to the present and illustrates the array of tactics and strategies that individuals and governments have employed to secure the seas. Benerson Little lends further dimension to this unending battle by including the history of piracy and privateering, ranging from the Mycenaean rovers to the modern pirates of Somalia. He also introduces associated naval warfare; maritime commerce and transportation; the development of speed under oar, sail, and steam; and the evolution of weaponry. More than just a vivid account of the war that seafarers and pirates have waged, Pirate Hunting is invaluable reading in a world where acts of piracy are once more a significant threat to maritime commerce and voyagers. It will appeal to readers interested in the history of piracy, anti-piracy operations, and maritime, naval, and military history worldwide.
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Death of an Empire

The Rise and Murderous Fall of Salem, America's Richest City

Author: Robert Booth

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9781429990264

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 4130

SALEM has long been notorious for the witch trials of 1692. But a hundred years later it was renowned for very different pursuits: vast wealth and worldwide trade. Now Death of an Empire tells the story of Salem's glory days in the age of sailing, and the murder that hastened its descent. When America first became a nation, Salem was the richest city in the republic, led by a visionary merchant who still ranks as one of the wealthiest men in history. For decades, Salem connected America with the wider world, through a large fleet of tall ships and a pragmatic, egalitarian brand of commerce taht remains a model of enlightened international relations. But America's emerging big cities and westward expansion began to erode Salem's national political importance just as its seafaring economy faltered in the face of tariffs and global depression. With Salem's standing as a world capital imperiled, two men, equally favored by fortune, struggled for its future: one, a progressive merchant-politician, tried to build new institutions and businesses, while the other, a reclusive crime lord, offered a demimonde of forbidden pleasures. The scandalous trial that followed signaled Salem's fall from national prominence, a fall that echoed around the world in the loss of friendly trade and in bloody reprisals against native peoples by the U.S. Navy. Death of an Empire is an exciting tale of a remarkably rich era, shedding light on a little-known but fascinating period of Ameriacn history in which characters such as Nathaniel Hawthorne, John Quincy Adams, and Daniel Webster interact with the ambitious merchants and fearless mariners who made Salem famous around the world.
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The Book of Buried Treasure

Story Pirates

Author: Ralph Delahaye Paine

Publisher: 谷月社

ISBN: N.A

Category: Fiction

Page: 400

View: 9262

CHAPTER I THE WORLD-WIDE HUNT FOR VANISHED RICHES CHAPTER II CAPTAIN KIDD IN FACT AND FICTION CHAPTER III CAPTAIN KIDD, HIS TREASURE[1] The official inventory of the Kidd treasure found on Gardiner's Island. This is the only original and authenticated record of any treasure belonging to Captain Kidd. (From the British State Papers in the Public Record Office, London.) A memorandum of Captain Kidd's treasure left on Gardiner's Island. This is his own declaration, signed and sworn. Statement of Edward Davis, who sailed home with Kidd, concerning the landing of the treasure and goods. CHAPTER IV CAPTAIN KIDD, HIS TRIAL, AND DEATH The French pass or safe conduct paper found by Kidd in the ship Quedah Merchant. This document, which was suppressed by the prosecution, is evidence that the prize was a lawful capture. Kidd vainly begged at his trial that this was another French pass be produced as evidence in his favor. CHAPTER V THE WONDROUS FORTUNE OF WILLIAM PHIPS Sir William Phips, first royal governor of Massachusetts. Map of Hispaniola (Hayti and San Domingo) engraved in 1723, showing the buccaneers at their trade of hunting wild cattle. The galleon due north of Port Plate on the north coast is almost exactly in the place where Phips found his treasure. Permit issued by Sir William Phips as royal governor in which he uses the title "Vice Admiral" which involved him in disastrous quarrels. The oldest existing print of Boston harbor as it appeared in the time of Sir William Phips, showing the kind of ships in which he sailed to find his treasure. CHAPTER VI THE BOLD SEA ROGUE, JOHN QUELCH An ancient map of Jamaica showing the haunts of the pirates and the track of the treasure galleons. The town and bay of Tobermory, Island of Mull. The treasure galleon is supposed to have gone down in the place indicated by the cross at the right hand side of the photograph. CHAPTER VII THE ARMADA GALLEON OF TOBERMORY BAY Defeat of the Spanish Armada. From the painting by P. de Loutherbourg. CHAPTER VIII THE LOST PLATE FLEET OF VIGO Sir George Rooke, commanding the British fleet at the battle of Vigo Bay. The Royal Sovereign, one of Admiral Sir George Rooke's line-of-battle ships, engaged at Vigo Bay. CHAPTER IX THE PIRATES' HOARD OF TRINIDAD Lima Cathedral CHAPTER X THE LURE OF COCOS ISLAND CHAPTER XI THE MYSTERY OF THE LUTINE FRIGATE CHAPTER XII THE TOILERS OF THE THETIS CHAPTER XIII THE QUEST OF EL DORADO Sir Walter Raleigh. CHAPTER XIV THE WIZARDRY OF THE DIVINING ROD Methods of manipulating the diving rod to find buried treasure. (From La Physique Occulte, first edition, 1596.) CHAPTER XV SUNDRY PIRATES AND THEIR BOOTY CHAPTER XVI PRACTICAL HINTS FOR TREASURE SEEKERS
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Flying the Black Flag: A Brief History of Piracy

A Brief History of Piracy

Author: Alfred S. Bradford

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 0275996859

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 1135

Many peoples throughout history have fought pirates, writes Alfred Bradford in Flying the Black Flag. Some have lost and some have won. We should learn from their experience. From Odysseus—the original pirate of literature and lore—through Blackbeard and the feared pirates of the Spanish Main, his book reveals the strategies and methods pirates used to cheat, lie, kill, and rob their way into the historical record, wreaking terror in their bloody wakes. The story begins with a discussion of Piracy and the Suppression of Piracy in the Ancient World. It details, for example, how the Illyrians used pirate vessels to try to wrest control of the Adriatic Coast from the mighty Romans, as well as how the intrepid Vikings went from pirate raids to the conquest of parts of Western Europe. Moving into the 17th century and to the New World, Bradford depicts the golden age of the pirates. Here are the Spanish Buccaneers and the fabled Caribbean stronghold of Tortuga. Here are Henry Morgan, Captain Kidd, and their fearsome counterparts. But piracy was hardly just a Western phenomenon. The Barbary Pirates looks East to examine the struggle between Christian and Muslim in the Mediterranean, while To the Shores of Tripoli details the American conflict with the Barbary Pirates. It reveals the lessons of a war conducted across a great distance against a nebulous enemy, a war in which victory was achieved only by going after the pirates' sponsor. On the South China Coast, we meet the first Dragon Lady, leader of Chinese pirates. As intriguing as these tales of the past are in and of themselves, the stories and their swashbuckling villains hold lessons for us even today. In Conclusions and Reflections, Bradford gathers all of the chords together, discussing the conditions under which piracy arises, the conditions under which pirates organize and become more powerful, and the methods used to suppress piracy. Finally, he examines similarities between pirates and terrorists—and whether the lessons learned from the wars against pirates of the past might also apply to modern day terrorists.
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The Guns of Ivrea

Author: Clifford Beal

Publisher: Solaris

ISBN: 1849979200

Category: Fiction

Page: 480

View: 3644

Patrick O'Brian meets George R. R. Martin in a gritty new fantasy epic. Acquel Galenus, former thief and now monk, uncovers a terrible secret under the Great Temple at Livorna, one that could shake the faith to its core. A secret that could get him killed. A secret that could enable an older, more sinister form of worship to be reborn. Pirate princeling Nicolo Danamis, mercenary to the King and captain of the largest fleet in Valdur, has made one deal too many, and enemies are now closing in to destroy him. Citala, fair-haired and grey-skinned, the daughter of the chieftain of the merfolk, finds herself implacably drawn to the affairs of men. She puts events in motion that will end her people’s years of isolation but that could imperil their very existence. All their fates will intertwine as they journey across the land, through duchies and free cities riven by political intrigue, religious fervour, and ancient hatreds. Alliances are being forged anew and after decades of wary peace, war is on the wind once again...
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Gideon's Angel

Author: Clifford Beal

Publisher: Solaris

ISBN: 184997490X

Category: Fiction

Page: 368

View: 2197

1653. The long, bloody English Civil War is at an end. King Charles is dead and Oliver Cromwell rules the land. Richard Treadwell, Royalist, exile, and now soldier for the King of France, burns with revenge for those who deprive him of his family and fortune. He returns to England in secret to assassinate Cromwell. But his is not the only plot in motion. A secret army run by a deluded Puritan is bent on the same quest, guided by the Devil’s hand. When demonic entities are summoned, Treadwell finds his fortunes reversed: he must save Cromwell, or consign England to Hell... But first he has to contend with a wife he left in Devon who believes she’s a widow, a furious Parisian mistress who has trailed him to England, and a young Musketeer named d’Artagnan, sent to drag him back to France. It’s a dangerous new Republic, for an old Cavalier coming home. “Prepare for a swashbuckling, roller-coaster unputdownable read, full of derring do, bodice ripping and political intrigue. Clifford Beal is a great story teller who keeps his readers on the edge of their seats. Note to Hollywood producers, snap this one up now.”Jerry Hayes, The Spectator
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Wilderness of Spring

Author: Edgar Pangborn

Publisher: The Floating Press

ISBN: 1775459969

Category: Fiction

Page: 478

View: 5421

The time is the early eighteenth century, and two young brothers are the sole survivors of a brutal attack perpetrated on their New England village by the French. They eventually are reunited with some members of their extended family, but will the two boys be able to make their way in the world without the loving guidance of their parents? This detailed historical novel is a gripping, emotionally engaging read.
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Immigration at the Golden Gate

Passenger Ships, Exclusion, and Angel Island

Author: Robert Eric Barde

Publisher: Praeger Publishers

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 283

View: 6325

Perhaps 200,000 immigrants passed through the Angel Island Immigration Station during its lifetime, a tiny number compared to the 17 million who entered through New York's Ellis Island. Nonetheless, Angel Island's place in the consciousness of Americans on the West Coast is large, out of all proportion to the numerical record. This place is not conceded fondly or with gratitude. Angel Island's Immigration Station was not, as some have called it, the Ellis Island of the West, built to facilitate the processing and entry of those welcomed as new Americans. Its role was less benign: to facilitate the exclusion of Asians-first the Chinese, then Japanese, Koreans, Indians, and all other Asians. This was the era when a rampant public hostility to newcomers posed grave threats to the liberties of all immigrants, especially those from Asia. The phrase Angel Island connotes more than a rocky outpost rearing up inside the mouth of San Francisco Bay, more, even, than shorthand for the various government outposts-military, health, and immigration--that guarded the Western Gate. Angel Island reminds us of an important chapter in the history of immigration to the United States, one that was truly a multicultural enterprise long before that expression was even imagined. With the restoration of the Immigration Station and the creation of a suitable museum/learning center, Angel Island may well become as much part of the American collective imagination as Ellis Island-but with its own, quite different, twist. This book shows how natives and newcomers experienced the immigration process on the west coast. Although Angel Island's role in American immigration was greatest at the dawn of the previous century, the process of immigration continues. The voices of a century ago--of exclusion, of bureaucratic and judicial nightmares, of the interwoven interests of migrants and business people of the fear of foreigners and their diseases, of moral ambiguity and uncertainty--all echo to the present day.
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The Pirates' Who's Who

Giving Particulars of the Lives & Deaths of the Pirates & Buccaneers

Author: Philip Gosse

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 9781535121811

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 458

View: 1683

432 Pages of Pirate Lore and Reference The pirates' who's who; giving particulars of the lives & deaths of the pirates & buccaneers A Must have classic Pirate accounting - Lives, Deaths, Nations of Origin, Definitions and Lingo
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The Site of Petrarchism

Early Modern National Sentiment in Italy, France, and England

Author: William J. Kennedy

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 0801881269

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 400

View: 335

Drawing upon poststructuralist theories of nationalism and national identity developed by such writers as Etienne Balibar, Emmanuel Levinas, Julia Kristeva, Antonio Negri, and Slavoj Zizek, noted Renaissance scholar William J. Kennedy argues that the Petrarchan sonnet serves as a site for early modern expressions of national sentiment in Italy, France, England, Spain, and Germany. Kennedy pursues this argument through historical research into Renaissance commentaries on Petrarch's poetry and critical studies of such poets as Lorenzo de' Medici, Joachim du Bellay and the Pléiade brigade, Philip and Mary Sidney, and Mary Wroth. Kennedy begins with a survey of Petrarch's poetry and its citation in Italy, explaining how major commentators tried to present Petrarch as a spokesperson for competing versions of national identity. He then shows how Petrarch's model helped define social class, political power, and national identity in mid-sixteenth-century France, particularly in the nationalistic sonnet cycles of Joachim Du Bellay. Finally, Kennedy discusses how Philip Sidney and his sister Mary and niece Mary Wroth reworked Petrarch's model to secure their family's involvement in forging a national policy under Elizabeth I and James I. Treating the subject of early modern national expression from a broad comparative perspective, The Site of Petrarchism will be of interest to scholars of late medieval and early modern literature in Europe, historians of culture, and critical theorists. -- Richard Helgerson
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America's Home Front Heroes

An Oral History of World War II

Author: Stacy Enyeart

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 0313377898

Category: History

Page: 125

View: 7639

A new compendium of firsthand reminiscences of life on the American home front during World War II. * 34 concise oral histories describing everyday life in the United States during World War II * Four sections: A Time for Heightened Passion, A Time for Caution, A Time for Flag Waving, and A Time for War Plant Women * Based entirely on primary sources—letters, journals, correspondence, interviews, etc—from people who lived through World War II on the American home front * Photographs that capture the look and feel of how life changed for Americans at home during World War II * Includes contributions and photographs from Martha Kostyra, mother of Martha Stewart
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