Prudence Crandall’s Legacy

The Fight for Equality in the 1830s, Dred Scott, and Brown v. Board of Education

Author: Donald E. Williams, Jr.

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press

ISBN: 0819574716

Category: Social Science

Page: 476

View: 2309

Prudence Crandall was a schoolteacher who fought to integrate her school in Canterbury, Connecticut, and educate black women in the early nineteenth century. When Crandall accepted a black woman as a student, she unleashed a storm of controversy that catapulted her to national notoriety, and drew the attention of the most significant pro- and anti-slavery activists of the day. The Connecticut state legislature passed its infamous Black Law in an attempt to close down her school. Arrested and jailed, Crandall’s legal legacy had a lasting impact—Crandall v. State was the first full-throated civil rights case in U.S. history. The arguments by attorneys in Crandall played a role in two of the most fateful Supreme Court decisions, Dred Scott v. Sandford, and the landmark case of Brown v. Board of Education. In Prudence Crandall’s Legacy, author and lawyer Donald E. Williams Jr. marshals a wealth of detail concerning the life and work of Prudence Crandall, her unique role in the fight for civil rights, and her influence on legal arguments for equality in America.
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Miss Crandall's School for Young Ladies and Little Misses of Color

Poems

Author: Elizabeth Alexander,Marilyn Nelson

Publisher: Boyds Mills Press

ISBN: 9781590784563

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 47

View: 2127

Poets Elizabeth Alexander and Marilyn Nelson tell the story of Prudence Crandall's school for African American girls opened in 1833.
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To Awaken My Afflicted Brethren

David Walker and the Problem of Antebellum Slave Resistance

Author: Peter P. Hinks

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 9780271042749

Category: Political Science

Page: N.A

View: 9113

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Wild Mares

My Lesbian Back-To-the-Land Life

Author: Dianna Hunter

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781517902667

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 248

View: 6593

A wry memoir of growing up, coming out, and going back to the land as a lesbian feminist in the rural Midwest of the 1960s and 70s Dianna Hunter was a softball-loving, working-class tomboy in North Dakota, surviving the threat of the Cuban Missile Crisis and Mutually Assured Destruction in the shadow of a strategic air command base. Communists and antiwar hippies were the enemy, but lesbians were a threat, too: they were unhealthy, criminal, and downright insane. It took Dianna a while to figure out that she was one, a little longer to discover how she fit in with her new communities in the city and the countryside. This is her story--a frank account by turns comic and painful of a well-behaved Midwestern girl finding her way through polite denial and repression and running head-on into the eye-opening events of the 1960s and '70s before landing on a dairy farm. A bumpy route takes Dianna to the Twin Cities, then to rural Minnesota and Wisconsin as--by way of the antiwar movement, women's liberation, and a dose of lesbian feminism--she and her friends try to establish a rural utopia free of sexual oppression, violence, materialism, environmental degradation--and men. They dream big, love as they see fit, and make do until they don't. Dianna buys a dairy farm and, with it, a new set of problems thanks to the Reagan-era farm crisis. A firsthand account of the lesbian feminist movement at its inception, Wild Mares is a deeply personal, wryly wise, and always engaging view of identity politics lived and learned in real life and, literally, on the ground, flourishing in the fertile soil of a struggling dairy farm in the American heartland.
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Heroes for All Time

Connecticut Civil War Soldiers Tell Their Stories

Author: Dione Longley,Buck Zaidel

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press

ISBN: 0819571172

Category: History

Page: 342

View: 5785

Voices of Civil War soldiers rise from the pages of Heroes for All Time. This book presents the war straight from the minds and pens of its participants; rich passages from soldiers’ letters and diaries complement hundreds of outstanding period photographs, most previously unpublished. The soldiers’ moving experiences, thoughts, and images animate each chapter. Written accounts by nurses and doctors, soldiers’ families, and volunteers on the home front add intriguing details to our picture of the struggle, which claimed roughly 6,000 Connecticut lives. Rare war artifacts—a bone ring carved on the battlefield or a wad of tobacco acquired from a rebel picket—connect the reader to the men and boys who once owned them. From camp life to battle, from Virginia to Louisiana, from the opening shot at Bull Run to the cheering at Appomattox, Heroes for All Time tells the story of the war through vivid, personal portrayals.
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Homegrown Terror

Benedict Arnold and the Burning of New London

Author: Eric D. Lehman

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press

ISBN: 0819573302

Category: History

Page: 300

View: 4659

On September 6, 1781, Connecticut native Benedict Arnold and a force of 1,600 British soldiers and loyalists took Fort Griswold and burnt New London to the ground. The brutality of the invasion galvanized the new nation, and “Remember New London!” would become a rallying cry for troops under General Lafayette. In Homegrown Terror, Eric D. Lehman chronicles the events leading up to the attack and highlights this key transformation in Arnold—the point where he went from betraying his comrades to massacring his neighbors and destroying their homes. This defining incident forever marked him as a symbol of evil, turning an antiheroic story about weakness of character and missed opportunity into one about the nature of treachery itself. Homegrown Terror draws upon a variety of perspectives, from the traitor himself to his former comrades like Jonathan Trumbull and Silas Deane, to the murdered Colonel Ledyard. Rethinking Benedict Arnold through the lens of this terrible episode, Lehman sheds light on the ethics of the dawning nation, and the way colonial America responded to betrayal and terror.
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The Logbooks

Connecticut’s Slave Ships and Human Memory

Author: Anne Farrow

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press

ISBN: 081957306X

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 6346

In 1757, a sailing ship owned by an affluent Connecticut merchant sailed from New London to the tiny island of Bence in Sierra Leone, West Africa, to take on fresh water and slaves. On board was the owner’s son, on a training voyage to learn the trade. The Logbooks explores that voyage, and two others documented by that young man, to unearth new realities of Connecticut’s slave trade and question how we could have forgotten this part of our past so completely. When writer Anne Farrow discovered the significance of the logbooks for the Africa and two other ships in 2004, her mother had been recently diagnosed with dementia. As Farrow bore witness to the impact of memory loss on her mother’s sense of self, she also began a journey into the world of the logbooks and the Atlantic slave trade, eventually retracing part of the Africa’s long-ago voyage to Sierra Leone. As the narrative unfolds in The Logbooks, Farrow explores the idea that if our history is incomplete, then collectively we have forgotten who we are—a loss that is in some ways similar to what her mother experienced. Her meditations are well rounded with references to the work of writers, historians, and psychologists. Forthright, well researched, and warmly recounted, Farrow’s writing is that of a novelist’s, with an eye for detail. Using a wealth of primary sources, she paints a vivid picture of the eighteenth-century Connecticut slavers. The multiple narratives combine in surprising and effective ways to make this an intimate confrontation with the past, and a powerful meditation on how slavery still affects us.
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Connecticut in the American Civil War

Slavery, Sacrifice, and Survival

Author: Matthew Warshauer

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press

ISBN: 0819571385

Category: History

Page: 309

View: 1835

A riveting account of Connecticut s involvement in the Civil War"
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Local Government in Connecticut, Third Edition

Author: Frank B. Connolly

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press

ISBN: 0819574023

Category: Political Science

Page: 240

View: 5846

Originally published in 1992 and revised in 2001, Frank B. Connolly’s Local Government in Connecticut is one of the most useful and well-established resources on the state’s local government. Written expressly for public officials and students, the book explains Connecticut’s basic forms of local government and its many variants, as well as examining their inner workings, including governance, management, administration, municipal services, education, and land use. This new edition has been entirely revised, expanded, and updated, with new chapters on charter revision, municipal employees and unionization, education, homeland security and local government, pensions, and economic development. It includes references to key sections of the Connecticut General Statutes. This unique and indispensable resource for the state is published in cooperation with the Connecticut Conference of Municipalities.
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The British Raid on Essex

The Forgotten Battle of the War of 1812

Author: Jerry Roberts

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press

ISBN: 0819574775

Category: History

Page: 220

View: 1420

This is the dynamic account of one of the most destructive maritime actions to take place in Connecticut history: the 1814 British attack on the privateers of Pettipaug, known today as the British Raid on Essex. During the height of the War of 1812, 136 Royal marines and sailors made their way up the Connecticut River from warships anchored in Long Island Sound. Guided by a well-paid American traitor the British navigated the Saybrook shoals and advanced up the river under cover of darkness. By the time it was over, the British had burned twenty-seven American vessels, including six newly built privateers. It was the largest single maritime loss of the war. Yet this story has been virtually left out of the history books—the forgotten battle of the forgotten war. This new account from author and historian Jerry Roberts is the definitive overview of this event and includes a wealth of new information drawn from recent research and archaeological finds. Lavish illustrations and detailed maps bring the battle to life.
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Becoming Tom Thumb

Charles Stratton, P. T. Barnum, and the Dawn of American Celebrity

Author: Eric D. Lehman

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press

ISBN: 0819573329

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 276

View: 2729

Winner of the Henry-Russell Hitchcock Award, Victorian Society of America (2014) When P. T. Barnum met twenty-five-inch-tall Charles Stratton at a Bridgeport, Connecticut hotel in 1843, one of the most important partnerships in entertainment history was born. With Barnum’s promotional skills and the miniature Stratton’s comedic talents, they charmed a Who’s Who of the 19th century, from Queen Victoria to Charles Dickens to Abraham Lincoln. Adored worldwide as “General Tom Thumb,” Stratton played to sold-out shows for almost forty years. From his days as a precocious child star to his tragic early death, Becoming Tom Thumb tells the full story of this iconic figure for the first time. It details his triumphs on the New York stage, his epic celebrity wedding, and his around-the-world tour, drawing on newly available primary sources and interviews. From the mansions of Paris to the deserts of Australia, Stratton’s unique brand of Yankee comedy not only earned him the accolades of millions of fans, it helped move little people out of the side show and into the lime light.
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Garnet Poems

An Anthology of Connecticut Poetry Since 1776

Author: Dennis Barone

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press

ISBN: 0819573108

Category: Poetry

Page: 296

View: 2845

Connecticut may be a small state, but it is large indeed in its contribution to the nation’s literature. Garnet Poems features forty-two poets whose work has a strong connection to Connecticut. The first major anthology of Connecticut poetry to appear since the mid-nineteenth century, it includes the work of such notable poets as Wallace Stevens, Lydia Sigourney, Mark Van Doren, Richard Wilbur, Susan Howe, and Elizabeth Alexander. Distinguished writer-scholar Dennis Barone has supplemented the poems with an editor’s preface, notes that illuminate the poet’s (or poem's) relation to the state, and informative biographies. The book also features a foreword by Dick Allen, the current Connecticut state poet laureate.
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Patterns of Home

The Ten Essentials of Enduring Design

Author: Max Jacobson,Murray Silverstein,Barbara Winslow

Publisher: Taunton Press

ISBN: 1561585335

Category: House & Home

Page: 282

View: 2905

Clearly written and profusely illustrated, this text brings the timeless lessons of residential design to homeowners who seek inspiration and direction. Insightful tours of 33 homes bring essential design concepts to life. 300 color photos. 50 illustrations.
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Every Home a Distillery

Alcohol, Gender, and Technology in the Colonial Chesapeake

Author: Sarah H. Meacham

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 0801897912

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 6834

American historians will find this study both enlightening and surprising.
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Post Roads & Iron Horses

Transportation in Connecticut from Colonial Times to the Age of Steam

Author: Richard DeLuca

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press

ISBN: 0819568562

Category: History

Page: 251

View: 4827

The fascinating history of turnpikes, steamboats, canals, railroads, and trolleys in Connecticut
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End of the Line

Closing the Last Sardine Cannery in America

Author: Markham Starr

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press

ISBN: 0819573469

Category: Photography

Page: 232

View: 1811

At one time, sardines were an inexpensive staple for many Americans. The 212 photographs in this elegant volume offer a striking document of this now vanished industry. Generations of workers in Maine have snipped, sliced, and packed the small, silvery fish into billions of cans on their way to Americans’ lunch buckets and kitchen cabinets. On April 15, 2010, Stinson’s Seafood, once the home of Beach Cliff Sardines, shut down the packing line that had made the name world famous. Begun in 1927, Stinson’s empire eventually included sardine canneries spread along the Maine coast and a fleet of ships to supply them. With this closing, however, the end of the entire sardine industry in Maine had finally arrived. Photographer Markham Starr was privileged to spend several days at the Stinson factory in Prospect Harbor, one month before it was dismantled, emerging with a collection of remarkable images that transform the parts of the cannery into works of art and capture the resilience of the workers faced with the loss of jobs many had held for decades. This book includes a short essay, and shows the heartland of Maine at its finest.
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Prudence Crandall

Woman of Courage

Author: Elizabeth Yates

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781563979781

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 256

View: 2651

First published in 1955, this widely acclaimed novel by Newbery Award-winning author Elizabeth Yates tells the inspiring true story of a young Quaker teacher name Prudence Crandall. The year is 1833, and Prudence Crandall opens a school for African American women in her town of Canterbury, Connecticut. That event creates a firestorm. Accused of defying the laws of God, Prudence Crandall is subjected to trials and imprisonment. But she will not yield in her belief that we are all equal in the eyes of God.
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The Dred Scott Case

Historical and Contemporary Perspectives on Race and Law

Author: David Thomas Konig,Paul Finkelman,Christopher Alan Bracey

Publisher: Ohio University Press

ISBN: 0821443283

Category: Law

Page: 292

View: 7807

In 1846 two slaves, Dred and Harriet Scott, filed petitions for their freedom in the Old Courthouse in St. Louis, Missouri. As the first true civil rights case decided by the U.S. Supreme Court, Dred Scott v. Sandford raised issues that have not been fully resolved despite three amendments to the Constitution and more than a century and a half of litigation. The Dred Scott Case: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives on Race and Law presents original research and the reflections of the nation’s leading scholars who gathered in St. Louis to mark the 150th anniversary of what was arguably the most infamous decision of the U.S. Supreme Court. The decision, which held that African Americans “had no rights” under the Constitution and that Congress had no authority to alter that, galvanized Americans and thrust the issue of race and law to the center of American politics. This collection of essays revisits the history of the case and its aftermath in American life and law. In a final section, the present-day justices of the Missouri Supreme Court offer their reflections on the process of judging and provide perspective on the misdeeds of their nineteenth-century predecessors who denied the Scotts their freedom. Contributors: Austin Allen, Adam Arenson, John Baugh, Hon. Duane Benton, Christopher Alan Bracey, Alfred L. Brophy, Paul Finkelman, Louis Gerteis, Mark Graber, Daniel W. Hamilton, Cecil J. Hunt II, David Thomas Konig, Leland Ware, Hon. Michael A. Wolff
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Thomas Crapper

Lavatory Legend

Author: Robert Hume

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780954990930

Category: Sanitary engineers

Page: 125

View: 8570

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Imperialism at Home

Race and Victorian Women's Fiction

Author: Susan Meyer

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801482557

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 220

View: 5814

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