Proceedings of the Twenty-Fifth Annual Meeting of the Lake Mohonk Conference of Friends of the Indian and Other Dependent Peoples, 1907 (Classic Reprint)

Author: Lilian D. Powers

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 9780331220957

Category: Political Science

Page: 632

View: 749

Excerpt from Proceedings of the Twenty-Fifth Annual Meeting of the Lake Mohonk Conference of Friends of the Indian and Other Dependent Peoples, 1907 The Twenty-fifth Annual Lake Mohonk Conference of Friends of the Indian and other Dependent Peoples met on the invitation of Hon. Albert K. Smiley, at Mohonk Lake, N. Y., October a3rd, a4th and asth, 1907. The topics discussed included afiairs among the Indians and in the Philip pines, Porto Rico and Hawan. The discussions are given, practically in full, in this volume. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
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Tales of the Old Indian Territory and Essays on the Indian Condition

Author: John Milton Oskison

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803237928

Category: Social Science

Page: 665

View: 4145

At the beginning of the twentieth century, Indian Territory, which would eventually become the state of Oklahoma, was a multicultural space in which various Native tribes, European Americans, and African Americans were equally engaged in struggles to carve out meaningful lives in a harsh landscape. John Milton Oskison, born in the territory to a Cherokee mother and an immigrant English father, was brought up engaging in his Cherokee heritage, including its oral traditions, and appreciating the utilitarian value of an American education. Oskison left Indian Territory to attend college and went on to have a long career in New York City journalism, working for the New York Evening Post and Collier?s Magazine. He also wrote short stories and essays for newspapers and magazines, most of which were about contemporary life in Indian Territory and depicted a complex multicultural landscape of cowboys, farmers, outlaws, and families dealing with the consequences of multiple interacting cultures. Though Oskison was a well-known and prolific Cherokee writer, journalist, and activist, few of his works are known today. This first comprehensive collection of Oskison?s unpublished autobiography, short stories, autobiographical essays, and essays about life in Indian Territory at the turn of the twentieth century fills a significant void in the literature and thought of a critical time and place in the history of the United States.
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The Blood of Government

Race, Empire, the United States, and the Philippines

Author: Paul A. Kramer

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807877173

Category: History

Page: 552

View: 4865

In 1899 the United States, having announced its arrival as a world power during the Spanish-Cuban-American War, inaugurated a brutal war of imperial conquest against the Philippine Republic. Over the next five decades, U.S. imperialists justified their colonial empire by crafting novel racial ideologies adapted to new realities of collaboration and anticolonial resistance. In this pathbreaking, transnational study, Paul A. Kramer reveals how racial politics served U.S. empire, and how empire-building in turn transformed ideas of race and nation in both the United States and the Philippines. Kramer argues that Philippine-American colonial history was characterized by struggles over sovereignty and recognition. In the wake of a racial-exterminist war, U.S. colonialists, in dialogue with Filipino elites, divided the Philippine population into "civilized" Christians and "savage" animists and Muslims. The former were subjected to a calibrated colonialism that gradually extended them self-government as they demonstrated their "capacities." The latter were governed first by Americans, then by Christian Filipinos who had proven themselves worthy of shouldering the "white man's burden." Ultimately, however, this racial vision of imperial nation-building collided with U.S. nativist efforts to insulate the United States from its colonies, even at the cost of Philippine independence. Kramer provides an innovative account of the global transformations of race and the centrality of empire to twentieth-century U.S. and Philippine histories.
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A Field of Their Own

Women and American Indian History, 1830–1941

Author: John M. Rhea

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 0806155442

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 5633

One hundred and forty years before Gerda Lerner established women’s history as a specialized field in 1972, a small group of women began to claim American Indian history as their own domain. A Field of Their Own examines nine key figures in American Indian scholarship to reveal how women came to be identified with Indian history and why they eventually claimed it as their own field. From Helen Hunt Jackson to Angie Debo, the magnitude of their research, the reach of their scholarship, the popularity of their publications, and their close identification with Indian scholarship makes their invisibility as pioneering founders of this specialized field all the more intriguing. Reclaiming this lost history, John M. Rhea looks at the cultural processes through which women were connected to Indian history and traces the genesis of their interest to the nineteenth-century push for women’s rights. In the early 1830s evangelical preachers and women’s rights proponents linked American Indians to white women’s religious and social interests. Later, pre-professional women ethnologists would claim Indians as a special political cause. Helen Hunt Jackson’s 1881 publication, A Century of Dishonor, and Alice Fletcher’s 1887 report, Indian Education and Civilization, foreshadowed the emerging history profession’s objective methodology and established a document-driven standard for later Indian histories. By the twentieth century, historians Emma Helen Blair, Louise Phelps Kellogg, and Annie Heloise Abel, in a bid to boost their professional status, established Indian history as a formal specialized field. However, enduring barriers continued to discourage American Indians from pursuing their own document-driven histories. Cultural and academic walls crumbled in 1919 when Cherokee scholar Rachel Caroline Eaton earned a Ph.D. in American history. Eaton and later Indigenous historians Anna L. Lewis and Muriel H. Wright would each play a crucial role in shaping Angie Debo’s 1940 indictment of European American settler colonialism, And Still the Waters Run. Rhea’s wide-ranging approach goes beyond existing compensatory histories to illuminate the national consequences of women’s century-long predominance over American Indian scholarship. In the process, his thoughtful study also chronicles Indigenous women’s long and ultimately successful struggle to transform the way that historians portray American Indian peoples and their pasts.
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American Indian Nonfiction

An Anthology of Writings, 1760s-1930s

Author: Bernd Peyer

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806137988

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 401

View: 7219

A survey of two centuries of Indian political writings
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Ethnographic empire

imperial culture and colonial state formation in Malaya and the Philippines, 1880-1940

Author: Daniel Goh Pei Siong

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 3913

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New Serial Titles

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Periodicals

Page: N.A

View: 3177

A union list of serials commencing publication after Dec. 31, 1949.
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Education Among the Navajo

An Historical Study

Author: Davida Woerner

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Indians of North America

Page: 227

View: 8329

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Progressive Primitivism

Race, Gender and Turn-of-the-century American Art

Author: Elizabeth West Hutchinson

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Art and race

Page: 650

View: 3098

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Author-title Catalog

Author: University of California, Berkeley. Library,University of California. Library

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Library catalogs

Page: N.A

View: 7853

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Lakota Woman

die Geschichte einer Sioux-Frau

Author: Mary Crow Dog

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783423361040

Category: Dakota Indians

Page: 250

View: 6006

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Confluence

Online Journal of World Philosophies

Author: Monika Kirloskar-Steinbach,James Maffie,Geeta Ramana

Publisher: Verlag Herder GmbH

ISBN: 3495468013

Category: Philosophy

Page: 160

View: 8433

Dieses englischsprachige Online-Journal erscheint zweimal im Jahr und bietet ausschließlich Originalbeiträge zu Themen der interkulturellen und komparativen Philosophie. Das ausführliche Konzept, den internationalen wissenschaftlichen Beirat sowie Band 1 als open-access-PDF finden Sie auf der Website confluence-journal.com. Band 1 enthält unter anderem folgende Beiträge: Intercultural Philosophy: A Conceptual Clarification R.A. Mall The Philosophical Roots of Racial Essentialism and Its Legacy N. Zack Symposium: Does the Concept of 'Truth' have Value in the Pursuit of Cross-Cultural Philosophy? H. Rosemont, Jr., J. Maffie, J. Maraldo, S. Thakchoe Book Review: An Amazing Piece of Comparative Philosophy (S.B. Oluwule, Socrates and Orunmila) H. Kimmerle Survey article: Red Wisdom: Highlighting Recent Writing in Native American Philosophy B.Y. Burkhart
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