The Mixtecs of Oaxaca

Ancient Times to the Present

Author: Ronald Spores,Andrew K. Balkansky

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 0806150890

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 2368

The Mixtec peoples were among the major original developers of Mesoamerican civilization. Centuries before the Spanish Conquest, they formed literate urban states and maintained a uniquely innovative technology and a flourishing economy. Today, thousands of Mixtecs still live in Oaxaca, in present-day southern Mexico, and thousands more have migrated to locations throughout Mexico, the United States, and Canada. In this comprehensive survey, Ronald Spores and Andrew K. Balkansky—both preeminent scholars of Mixtec civilization—synthesize a wealth of archaeological, historical, and ethnographic data to trace the emergence and evolution of Mixtec civilization from the time of earliest human occupation to the present. The Mixtec region has been the focus of much recent archaeological and ethnohistorical activity. In this volume, Spores and Balkansky incorporate the latest available research to show that the Mixtecs, along with their neighbors the Valley and Sierra Zapotec, constitute one of the world’s most impressive civilizations, antecedent to—and equivalent to—those of the better-known Maya and Aztec. Employing what they refer to as a “convergent methodology,” the authors combine techniques and results of archaeology, ethnohistory, linguistics, biological anthropology, ethnology, and participant observation to offer abundant new insights on the Mixtecs’ multiple transformations over three millennia.
Release

Cultural Evolution

Contemporary Viewpoints

Author: Gary M. Feinman,Linda Manzanilla

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1461541735

Category: Social Science

Page: 269

View: 8374

Drawing on Kent Flannery's forty years of cross-cultural research in the area, the contributors to this collection reflect the current diversity of contemporary approaches to the study of cultural evolutionary processes. Collectively the volume expresses the richness of the issues being investigated by comparative theorists interested in long-term change, as well as the wide variety of data, approaches, and ideas that researchers are employing to examine these questions.
Release

Mixtecs, Zapotecs, and Chatinos

Ancient Peoples of Southern Mexico

Author: Arthur A. Joyce

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1444360477

Category: Social Science

Page: 368

View: 5393

Mixtecs, Zapotecs, and Chatinos: Ancient Peoples of Southern Mexico examines the origins, history, and interrelationships of the civilizations that arose and flourished in Oaxaca. Provides an up-to-date summary of the current state of research findings and archaeological evidence Uses contemporary social theory to address many key problems relating to archaeology of the Americas, including the dynamics of social life and the rise and fall of civilizations Adds clarity to ongoing debates over cultural change and interregional interactions in ancient Mesoamerican societies Supplemented with compelling illustrations, photographs, and line drawings of various archaeological sites and artifacts
Release

Excavations at Cerro Tilcajete

A Monte Albán II Administrative Center in the Valley of Oaxaca

Author: Christina M. Elson

Publisher: University of Michigan Museum

ISBN: 9780915703661

Category: Social Science

Page: 138

View: 4266

This volume¿the fourteenth in the monograph series on the prehistory and human ecology of the Valley of Oaxaca, Mexico¿focuses on Cerro Tilcajete, a secondary administrative center below Monte Albán, the capital of the prehispanic Zapotec state. After defeating the Tilcajete region, Monte Albán created a new administrative center for the Ocatlán region: Cerro Tilcajete. Elson's excavations at the Period II center showed that, in contrast to San José Mogote, Cerro Tilcajete was a newly created regional center rather than a reoccupation of an earlier site, and documented the nature of Cerro Tilcajete's ties to Monte Albán, especially the links between the elite families at the capital and those at Cerro Tilcajete. Elson deftly moves us away from the top-down, capital-centric focus, and in so doing, gives us new insights into secondary administrative centers in a pristine state.
Release

Metaarchaeology

Reflections by Archaeologists and Philosophers

Author: Lester Embree

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9401118264

Category: Philosophy

Page: 343

View: 2318

An idea of the philosophy of archaeology can best be gained by showing what it is, what the issues are, who is working in the field, and how they proceed. Reading Lester Embree's Metaarchaeology provides the best possible introduction to the field, since in it several leading archaeologists show how accessible and interesting the current archeological literature is, and currently active philosophers of archaeology reveal something of the current state of discussion on the subject. Bibliographies have also been developed of the philosophy of archaeology as well as of selected parts of the component that can be called metaarchaeology. Finally, an historical introduction has been included to show the variety of metascientific as well as orientational standpoints that philosophers of archaeology have had recourse to for over two decades, followed by speculation about the future of the discipline within the philosophy of science.
Release

Gender and Power in Prehispanic Mesoamerica

Author: Rosemary A. Joyce

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292779739

Category: Social Science

Page: 287

View: 1423

Gender was a fluid potential, not a fixed category, before the Spaniards came to Mesoamerica. Childhood training and ritual shaped, but did not set, adult gender, which could encompass third genders and alternative sexualities as well as "male" and "female." At the height of the Classic period, Maya rulers presented themselves as embodying the entire range of gender possibilities, from male through female, by wearing blended costumes and playing male and female roles in state ceremonies. This landmark book offers the first comprehensive description and analysis of gender and power relations in prehispanic Mesoamerica from the Formative Period Olmec world (ca. 1500-500 BC) through the Postclassic Maya and Aztec societies of the sixteenth century AD. Using approaches from contemporary gender theory, Rosemary Joyce explores how Mesoamericans created human images to represent idealized notions of what it meant to be male and female and to depict proper gender roles. She then juxtaposes these images with archaeological evidence from burials, house sites, and body ornaments, which reveals that real gender roles were more fluid and variable than the stereotyped images suggest.
Release