Post-war Cinema and Modernity

A Film Reader

Author: John Orr,Olga Taxidou

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814762028

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 445

View: 9654

Post-war Cinema and Modernity explores the relationship between film and modernity in the second half of the twentieth century. It begins with essays analyzing new post-war forms of film narrative and responses to the filmic innovations of the 1960s and the question of modernism. Pasolini's landmark polemic on the cinema of poetry is a vital springboard for the later critiques of time and the image, subjectivities and their narrative transformation, and the topical question of film and postmodernity. A discussion of changes in film technology and cinematic perception extend to the questions of film documentary. Finally, there is a focus on cinematographers and their filmic collaboration. The second section, International Cinema, places filmmaking and filmmakers in a social and a national context. It brings together landmark essays which contextualize feature films historically, yet also highlight their aesthetic power and their wider cultural importance. Filmmakers discussed include Ozu, Welles, Bresson, Hitchcock, Godard, Egoyan, Fassbinder and Zhang Yimou. Contributors include: Nestor Almendros, Jacques Aumont, Andre Bazin, Noel Burch, Scott Bukatman, Michael Chapman, Rey Chow, Terry Comito, Timothy Corrigan, Angela Della Vacche, Gilles Deleuze, Peter Harcourt, Frederic Jameson, Bruce Kawin, Krzystof Kieslowski, Vassiliki Kolocotroni, Teresa de Lauretis, Colin MacCabe, Christian Metz, Tania Modleski, Laura Mulvey, Bill Nicholls, John Orr, David Pascoe, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Duncan Petrie, Donald Richie, Larry Salvato, Dennis Schaefer, Paul Schrader, Susan Sontag, Andrei Tarkovsky, J.P. Telotte, Paul Virilio, Peter Wollen, Ismail Xavier, Denise Youngblood.
Release

Schooling in Modernity

The Politics of Sponsored Films in Postwar Italy

Author: Paola Bonifazio

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442615982

Category: History

Page: 305

View: 4807

Paola Bonifazio investigates the ways in which films sponsored by Italian and American government agencies promoted a particular vision of modernization and industry and functioned as tools to govern the Italian people.
Release

Cinema and Modernity

Author: Murray Pomerance

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813538167

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 373

View: 2527

Brings together several essays by seventeen scholars to explore the complexity of the essential connection between film and modernity. This volume shows us the significant ways that film has both grown in the context of the modern world and played a central role in reflecting and shaping our interactions with it.
Release

Post-War Modernist Cinema and Philosophy

Confronting Negativity and Time

Author: H. Ford

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137283521

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 284

View: 500

A unique study of four major post-war European films by four key 'auteurs', which argues that these films exemplify film modernism at the peak of its philosophical reflection and aesthetic experimentation.
Release

Screening Modernism

European Art Cinema, 1950-1980

Author: András Bálint Kovács

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226451631

Category: Art

Page: 427

View: 1252

Casting fresh light on the renowned productions of auteurs like Antonioni, Fellini, and Bresson and drawing out from the shadows a range of important but lesser-known works, Screening Modernism is the first comprehensive study of European art cinema’s postwar heyday. Spanning from the 1950s to the 1970s, András Bálint Kovács’s encyclopedic work argues that cinematic modernism was not a unified movement with a handful of styles and themes but rather a stunning range of variations on the core principles of modern art. Illustrating how the concepts of modernism and the avant-garde variously manifest themselves in film, Kovács begins by tracing the emergence of art cinema as a historical category. He then explains the main formal characteristics of modern styles and forms as well as their intellectual foundation. Finally, drawing on modernist theory and philosophy along the way, he provides an innovative history of the evolution of modern European art cinema. Exploring not only modernism’s origins but also its stylistic, thematic, and cultural avatars, Screening Modernism ultimately lays out creative new ways to think about the historical periods that comprise this golden age of film.
Release

Logic of Sentiment

The Postwar Japanese Cinema and Questions of Modernity

Author: Mitsuhiro Yoshimoto

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Motion pictures

Page: 442

View: 1971

Release

Cinema, Audiences and Modernity

New perspectives on European cinema history

Author: Daniel Biltereyst,Richard Maltby,Philippe Meers

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136641998

Category: Social Science

Page: 232

View: 6712

This book sheds new light on the cinema and modernity debate by confronting established theories on the role of the modern cinematic experience with new empirical work on the history of the social experience of cinema-going, film audiences and film exhibition. The book provides a wide range of research methodologies and perspectives on these matters, including: the use of oral history methods questionnaires diaries audience letters as well as industrial, sociological and other accounts on historical film audiences. The collection’s case studies thus provide a "how to" compendium of current methodologies for researchers and students working on film and media audiences, film and media experiences, and historical reception. The volume is part of a ‘new cinema history’ effort within film and screen studies to look at film history not only as a history of production, textual relations or movies-as-artefacts, but rather to concentrate more on the receiving end, the social experience of cinema, and the engagement of film/cinema (history) ‘from below’. The contributions to the volume reflect upon the very different ways in which cinema has been accepted, rejected or disciplined as an agent of modernity in neighbouring parts of Europe, and how cinema-going has been promoted and regulated as a popular social practice at different times in twentieth-century European history.
Release

Film Noir and the Spaces of Modernity

Author: Edward Dimendberg

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674013469

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 327

View: 522

Exploring classic examples of film noir such as 'The Asphalt Jungle', 'Double Indemnity' and 'Kiss Me Deadly', alongside many lesser-known works, Dimendberg masterfully interweaves film history and urban history while perceptively analyzing works by Raymond Chandler, Edward Hopper and Siegfried Kracauer.
Release

Cinema, Memory, Modernity

The Representation of Memory from the Art Film to Transnational Cinema

Author: Russell J.A. Kilbourn

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134550154

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 276

View: 6895

Since its inception, cinema has evolved into not merely a ‘reflection’ but an indispensable index of human experience – especially our experience of time’s passage, of the present moment, and, most importantly perhaps, of the past, in both collective and individual terms. In this volume, Kilbourn provides a comparative theorization of the representation of memory in both mainstream Hollywood and international art cinema within an increasingly transnational context of production and reception. Focusing on European, North and South American, and Asian films, Kilbourn reads cinema as providing the viewer with not only the content and form of memory, but also with its own directions for use: the required codes and conventions for understanding and implementing this crucial prosthetic technology — an art of memory for the twentieth-century and beyond.
Release

Cinema and Modernity

Author: John Orr

Publisher: Polity

ISBN: 9780745611860

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 240

View: 3273

This book discusses the complex relation between modernity and cinema drawing particularly upon the European and American cinema during the second half of the twentieth century. Orr attempts to rethink the relation of film-making to the contemporary world challenging many of the critical complacencies of post-modernism and offering a fresh perspective upon the development of the modern cinema.
Release

Italian Locations

Reinhabiting the Past in Postwar Cinema

Author: Noa Steimatsky

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 081665087X

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 246

View: 8325

Fascism and the Second World War left Italy indelibly changed, and cinema was arguably the art that most rigorously confronted the devastated nation. In this examination of four Italian filmmakers, Noa Steimatsky brilliantly maps their forceful negotiation of Italy’s identity and posits that the cinematic forms they employ constitute an imaginary reinhabiting of Italy-one that is inextricably linked with the political, physical, and symbolic predicament of reconstruction. A dynamic intersection of pictorial and photographic, architectural and literary discourses inform Steimatsky’s revisionist interrogation of exemplary works from the 1940s to the mid–1960s. From the earliest documentary work of Michelangelo Antonioni on the River Po to Pier Paolo Pasolini’s re-siting of the Gospel in the arid, peripheral landscape of the Italian south, and from Roberto Rossellini’s tracing of a neorealist project in ruinous Berlin to Luchino Visconti’s wrought grandeur visited upon a humble Sicilian fishing village, Italian Locations probes the historical experience of displacement, anachronism, and a thoroughly contemporary anxiety in the cinematic arena. For Steimatsky, Antonioni’s modernist achievement, informed by his native landscape, Rossellini’s neorealist image of Italy as a nation of ruins, Visconti’s reaching back to the nineteenth century and even more archaic pasts, and Pasolini’s ambivalence about modernity-all partake in a search for a politically and culturally redeemed Italy. Noa Steimatsky is associate professor of the history of art and film studies at Yale University.
Release

German Postwar Films

Life and Love in the Ruins

Author: W. Wilms,W. Rasch

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230616976

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 224

View: 988

This volume offers a cultural, aesthetic, and critical reappraisal of German 'rubble films' produced in the immediate aftermath of the Second World War and constructs their meaning in a historical context.
Release

A New History of Japanese Cinema

Author: Isolde Standish

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1441161546

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 416

View: 7573

In A New History of Japanese Cinema Isolde Standish focuses on the historical development of Japanese film. She details an industry and an art form shaped by the competing and merging forces of traditional culture and of economic and technological innovation. Adopting a thematic, exploratory approach, Standish links the concept of Japanese cinema as a system of communication with some of the central discourses of the twentieth century: modernism, nationalism, humanism, resistance, and gender. After an introduction outlining the earliest years of cinema in Japan, Standish demonstrates cinema's symbolic position in Japanese society in the 1930s - as both a metaphor and a motor of modernity. Moving into the late thirties and early forties, Standish analyses cinema's relationship with the state-focusing in particular on the war and occupation periods. The book's coverage of the post-occupation period looks at "romance" films in particular. Avant-garde directors came to the fore during the 1960s and early seventies, and their work is discussed in depth. The book concludes with an investigation of genre and gender in mainstream films of recent years. In grappling with Japanese film history and criticism, most western commentators have concentrated on offering interpretations of what have come to be considered "classic" films. A New History of Japanese Cinema takes a genuinely innovative approach to the subject, and should prove an essential resource for many years to come.
Release

The Demons of Modernity

Ingmar Bergman and European Cinema

Author: John Orr†

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 0857459791

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 140

View: 5412

Ingmar Bergman's films had a very broad and rich relationship with the rest of European cinema, contrary to the myth that Bergman was a peripheral figure, culturally and aesthetically isolated from the rest of Europe. This book contends that he should be put at the very center of European film history by chronologically comparing Bergman's relationship to key European directors such as Carl Theodor Dreyer, Jean-Luc Godard, Michelangelo Antonioni, and Andrei Tarkovsky, and also looks at Bergman's critical relationship to key movements in film history such as the French New Wave. In so doing, it demonstrates how Ingmar Bergman's films illustrate the demonic struggle in modernity between faith and secularity through "his intense preoccupation with the malaise of intimacy."
Release

Shell Shock Cinema

Weimar Culture and the Wounds of War

Author: Anton Kaes

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691008507

Category: Art

Page: 328

View: 8855

Shell Shock Cinema explores how the classical German cinema of the Weimar Republic was haunted by the horrors of World War I and the the devastating effects of the nation's defeat. In this exciting new book, Anton Kaes argues that masterworks such as The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, Nosferatu, The Nibelungen, and Metropolis, even though they do not depict battle scenes or soldiers in combat, engaged the war and registered its tragic aftermath. These films reveal a wounded nation in post-traumatic shock, reeling from a devastating defeat that it never officially acknowledged, let alone accepted. Kaes uses the term "shell shock"--coined during World War I to describe soldiers suffering from nervous breakdowns--as a metaphor for the psychological wounds that found expression in Weimar cinema. Directors like Robert Wiene, F. W. Murnau, and Fritz Lang portrayed paranoia, panic, and fear of invasion in films peopled with serial killers, mad scientists, and troubled young men. Combining original close textual analysis with extensive archival research, Kaes shows how this post-traumatic cinema of shell shock transformed extreme psychological states into visual expression; how it pushed the limits of cinematic representation with its fragmented story lines, distorted perspectives, and stark lighting; and how it helped create a modernist film language that anticipated film noir and remains incredibly influential today. A compelling contribution to the cultural history of trauma, Shell Shock Cinema exposes how German film gave expression to the loss and acute grief that lay behind Weimar's sleek façade.
Release

Crisis of Gender and the Nation in Korean Literature and Cinema

Modernity Arrives Again

Author: Kelly Y. Jeong

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 073912451X

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 125

View: 3349

This book is about the changing constructs of modernity, masculinity, and gender relations and discourses in Korean literature and cinema during the crucial decades of the colonial and postcolonial era, from the 1920s to the 1960s, which have an enduring and wide-ranging impact on Korea's cultural experiences of the past century.
Release

Nippon Modern

Japanese Cinema of the 1920s And 1930s

Author: Mitsuyo Wada-Marciano

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN: 0824831829

Category: History

Page: 185

View: 1412

Nippon Modern is the first intensive study of Japanese cinema in the 1920s and 1930s, a period in which the country's film industry was at its most prolific and a time when cinema played a singular role in shaping Japanese modernity. During the interwar period, the signs of modernity were ubiquitous in Japan's urban architecture, literature, fashion, advertising, popular music, and cinema. The reconstruction of Tokyo following the disastrous earthquake of 1923 highlighted the extent of this cultural transformation, and the film industry embraced the reconfigured space as an expression of the modern. Shochiku Kamata Film Studios (1920-1936), the focus of this study, was the only studio that continued filmmaking in Tokyo following the city's complete destruction. Mitsuyo Wada-Marciano points to the influence of the new urban culture in Shochiku's interwar films, acclaimed as modan na eiga, or modern films, by and for Japanese. Wada-Marciano's thought-provoking examinations illustrate the reciprocal relationship between cinema and Japan's vernacular modernity--what Japanese modernity actually meant to Japanese. Her thorough and thoughtful analyses of dozens of films within the cultural contexts of Japan contribute to the current inquiry into non-Western vernacular modernities.
Release

Sounding the Modern Woman

The Songstress in Chinese Cinema

Author: Jean Ma

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822375621

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 296

View: 4345

From the beginning of the sound cinema era, singing actresses captivated Chinese audiences. In Sounding the Modern Woman, Jean Ma shows how their rise to stardom attests to the changing roles of women in urban modernity and the complex symbiosis between the film and music industries. The songstress—whether appearing as an opera actress, showgirl, revolutionary, or country lass—belongs to the lineage of the Chinese modern woman, and her forty year prevalence points to a distinctive gendering of lyrical expression in Chinese film. Ma guides readers through film history by way of the on and off-screen careers of many of the most compelling performers in Chinese film history, such as Zhou Xuan and Grace Chang, revealing the ways that national crises and Cold War conflict shaped their celebrity. As a bridge between the film cultures of prewar Shanghai and postwar Hong Kong, the songstress brings into view a dense web of connections linking these two periods and places that cut across the divides of war, national politics, and geography.
Release

Sociology on Film

Postwar Hollywood's Prestige Commodity

Author: Chris Cagle

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 0813576962

Category: History

Page: 194

View: 549

After World War II, Hollywood’s “social problem films”—tackling topical issues that included racism, crime, mental illness, and drug abuse—were hits with critics and general moviegoers alike. In an era of film famed for its reliance on pop psychology, these movies were a form of popular sociology, bringing the academic discipline’s concerns to a much broader audience. Sociology on Film examines how the postwar “problem film” translated contemporary policy debates and intellectual discussions into cinematic form in order to become one of the preeminent genres of prestige drama. Chris Cagle chronicles how these movies were often politically fractious, the work of progressive directors and screenwriters who drew scrutiny from the House Un-American Activities Committee. Yet he also proposes that the genre helped to construct an abstract discourse of “society” that served to unify a middlebrow American audience. As he considers the many forms of print media that served to inspire social problem films, including journalism, realist novels, and sociological texts, Cagle also explores their distinctive cinematic aesthetics. Through a close analysis of films like Gentleman’s Agreement, The Lost Weekend, and Intruder in the Dust, he presents a compelling case that the visual style of these films was intimately connected to their more expressly political and sociological aspirations. Sociology on Film demonstrates how the social problem picture both shaped and reflected the middle-class viewer’s national self-image, making a lasting impact on Hollywood’s aesthetic direction.
Release

Gender Meets Genre in Postwar Cinemas

Author: Christine Gledhill

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252093666

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 288

View: 7778

This remarkable collection uses genre as a fresh way to analyze the issues of gender representation in film theory, film production, spectatorship, and the contexts of reception. With a uniquely global perspective, these essays examine the intersection of gender and genre in not only Hollywood films but also in independent, European, Indian, and Hong Kong cinemas. Working in the area of postcolonial cinema, contributors raise issues dealing with indigenous and global cinemas and argue that contemporary genres have shifted considerably as both notions of gender and forms of genre have changed. The volume addresses topics such as the history of feminist approaches to the study of genre in film, issues of female agency in postmodernity, changes taking place in supposedly male-dominated genres, concepts of genre and its use of gender in global cinema, and the relationship between gender and sexuality in film. Contributors are Ira Bhaskar, Steven Cohan, Luke Collins, Pam Cook, Lucy Fischer, Jane Gaines, Christine Gledhill, Derek Kane-Meddock, E. Ann Kaplan, Samiha Matin, Katie Model, E. Deidre Pribram, Vicente Rodriguez Ortega, Adam Segal, Chris Straayer, Yvonne Tasker, Deborah Thomas, and Xiangyang Chen.
Release