Origins of Democratic Culture

Printing, Petitions, and the Public Sphere in Early-modern England

Author: David Zaret

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691006949

Category: History

Page: 291

View: 1820

This innovative work of historical sociology locates the origins of modern democratic discourse in the emergent culture of printing in early modern England. For David Zaret, the key to the rise of a democratic public sphere was the impact of this culture of printing on the secrecy and privilege that shrouded political decisions in seventeenth-century England. Zaret explores the unanticipated liberating effects of printing and printed communication in transforming the world of political secrecy into a culture of open discourse and eventually a politics of public opinion. Contrary to those who locate the origins of the public sphere in the philosophical tracts of the French Enlightenment, Zaret claims that it originated as a practical accomplishment, propelled by economic and technical aspects of printing--in particular heightened commercialism and increased capacity to produce texts. Zaret writes that this accomplishment gained impetus when competing elites--Royalists and Parliamentarians, Presbyterians and Independents--used printed material to reach the masses, whose leaders in turn invoked the authority of public opinion to lobby those elites. Zaret further shows how the earlier traditions of communication in England, from ballads and broadsides to inn and alehouse conversation, merged with the new culture of print to upset prevailing norms of secrecy and privilege. He points as well to the paradox for today's critics, who attribute the impoverishment of the public sphere to the very technological and economic forces that brought about the means of democratic discourse in the first place.
Release

Origins of Democratic Culture

Printing, Petitions, and the Public Sphere in Early-modern England

Author: David Zaret

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691006946

Category: History

Page: 291

View: 4140

This innovative work of historical sociology locates the origins of modern democratic discourse in the emergent culture of printing in early modern England. For David Zaret, the key to the rise of a democratic public sphere was the impact of this culture of printing on the secrecy and privilege that shrouded political decisions in seventeenth-century England. Zaret explores the unanticipated liberating effects of printing and printed communication in transforming the world of political secrecy into a culture of open discourse and eventually a politics of public opinion. Contrary to those who locate the origins of the public sphere in the philosophical tracts of the French Enlightenment, Zaret claims that it originated as a practical accomplishment, propelled by economic and technical aspects of printing--in particular heightened commercialism and increased capacity to produce texts. Zaret writes that this accomplishment gained impetus when competing elites--Royalists and Parliamentarians, Presbyterians and Independents--used printed material to reach the masses, whose leaders in turn invoked the authority of public opinion to lobby those elites. Zaret further shows how the earlier traditions of communication in England, from ballads and broadsides to inn and alehouse conversation, merged with the new culture of print to upset prevailing norms of secrecy and privilege. He points as well to the paradox for today's critics, who attribute the impoverishment of the public sphere to the very technological and economic forces that brought about the means of democratic discourse in the first place.
Release

The Gender of Freedom

Fictions of Liberalism and the Literary Public Sphere

Author: Elizabeth Maddock Dillon

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9780804729413

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 310

View: 610

In a sweeping reassessment of early American literature, The Gender of Freedom explores the workings of the literary public sphere—from its colonial emergence through the antebellum flourishing of sentimentalism. Placing representations of and by women at the center rather than the margin of the public sphere, this book links modern forms of political identity to the seemingly private images of gender displayed prominently in the developing public sphere. The “fictions of liberalism” explored in this book are those of marriage and motherhood, sentimental domesticity, and heterosexual desire—narratives that structure the private realm upon which liberalism depends for its meaning and value. In a series of bold theoretical arguments and nuanced readings of literary texts, the author explores the political force of these private narratives with chapters on the Antinomian crisis in Puritan Massachusetts, early national models of gender and marriage in the works of Charles Brockden Brown and Hannah Webster Foster, infanticide narratives and nineteenth-century accounts of motherhood in the work of Harriet Beecher Stowe and Lydia Maria Child, and “re-arranging” marriage in the poetry of Emily Dickinson.
Release

Economists and Societies

Discipline and Profession in the United States, Britain, and France, 1890s to 1990s

Author: Marion Fourcade

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400833139

Category: Social Science

Page: 384

View: 9679

Economists and Societies is the first book to systematically compare the profession of economics in the United States, Britain, and France, and to explain why economics, far from being a uniform science, differs in important ways among these three countries. Drawing on in-depth interviews with economists, institutional analysis, and a wealth of scholarly evidence, Marion Fourcade traces the history of economics in each country from the late nineteenth century to the present, demonstrating how each political, cultural, and institutional context gave rise to a distinct professional and disciplinary configuration. She argues that because the substance of political life varied from country to country, people's experience and understanding of the economy, and their political and intellectual battles over it, crystallized in different ways--through scientific and mercantile professionalism in the United States, public-minded elitism in Britain, and statist divisions in France. Fourcade moves past old debates about the relationship between culture and institutions in the production of expert knowledge to show that scientific and practical claims over the economy in these three societies arose from different elites with different intellectual orientations, institutional entanglements, and social purposes. Much more than a history of the economics profession, Economists and Societies is a revealing exploration of American, French, and British society and culture as seen through the lens of their respective economic institutions and the distinctive character of their economic experts.
Release

Becoming Right

How Campuses Shape Young Conservatives

Author: Amy J. Binder,Kate Wood

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400844878

Category: Social Science

Page: 424

View: 8440

Conservative pundits allege that the pervasive liberalism of America's colleges and universities has detrimental effects on undergraduates, most particularly right-leaning ones. Yet not enough attention has actually been paid to young conservatives to test these claims—until now. In Becoming Right, Amy Binder and Kate Wood carefully explore who conservative students are, and how their beliefs and political activism relate to their university experiences. Rich in interviews and insight, Becoming Right illustrates that the diverse conservative movement evolving among today’s college students holds important implications for the direction of American politics.
Release

The Eighteenth Century

A Current Bibliography

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Early printed books

Page: N.A

View: 482

Release

The Eighteenth Century

A Current Bibliography

Author: Kevin L. Cope,Robert C. Leitz, III

Publisher: AMS Press

ISBN: 9780404622282

Category: Reference

Page: 674

View: 1851

Release

Weaving self-evidence

a sociology of logic

Author: Claude Rosental

Publisher: Princeton Univ Pr

ISBN: N.A

Category: Mathematics

Page: 294

View: 8330

The development of theorems in logic is generally thought to be a solitary and purely cerebral activity, and therefore unobservable by sociologists. In Weaving Self-Evidence, French sociologist Claude Rosental challenges this notion by tracing the history of one well-known recent example in the field of artificial intelligence--a theorem on the foundations of fuzzy logic. Rosental's analyses disclose the inherently social nature of the process by which propositions in logic are produced, disseminated, and established as truths. Rosental describes the different phases of the emergence of the theorem on fuzzy logic, from its earliest drafts through its publication and diffusion, discussion and reformulation, and eventual acceptance by the scientific community. Through observations made at major universities and scholarly conferences, and in electronic forums, he looks at the ways students are trained in symbolic manipulations and formal languages and examines how researchers work, interact, and debate emerging new ideas. By carefully analyzing the concrete mechanisms that lead to the collective development and corroboration of proofs, Rosental shows how a logical discovery and its recognition within the scholarly community are by no means the product of any one individual working in isolation, but rather a social process that can be observed and studied.Weaving Self-Evidence will interest students and researchers in sociology and the history and philosophy of science and technology, and anyone curious about how scientists work.
Release

Protest with Chinese Characteristics

Demonstrations, Riots, and Petitions in the Mid-Qing Dynasty

Author: Ho-fung Hung

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231525451

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 8066

The origin of political modernity has long been tied to the Western history of protest and revolution, the currents of which many believe sparked popular dissent worldwide. Reviewing nearly one thousand instances of protest in China from the eighteenth to the early-nineteenth centuries, Ho-fung Hung charts an evolution of Chinese dissent that stands apart from Western trends. Hung samples from mid-Qing petitions and humble plaints to the emperor. He revisits rallies, riots, market strikes, and other forms of contention rarely considered in previous studies. Drawing on new world history, which accommodates parallels and divergences between political-economic and cultural developments East and West, Hung shows how the centralization of political power and an expanding market, coupled with a persistent Confucianist orthodoxy, shaped protesters' strategies and appeals in Qing China. This unique form of mid-Qing protest combined a quest for justice and autonomy with a filial-loyal respect for the imperial center, and Hung's careful research ties this distinct characteristic to popular protest in China today. As Hung makes clear, the nature of these protests prove late imperial China was anything but a stagnant and tranquil empire before the West cracked it open. In fact, the origins of modern popular politics in China predate the 1911 Revolution. Hung's work ultimately establishes a framework others can use to compare popular protest among different cultural fabrics. His book fundamentally recasts the evolution of such acts worldwide.
Release

Sociology

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 7137

Release

Oral and Literate Culture in England, 1500-1700

Author: Adam Fox

Publisher: Clarendon Press

ISBN: 0191542296

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 5788

This book explores the varied vernacular forms and rich oral traditions which were such a part of popular culture in early modern England. It focuses, in particular, upon dialect speech and proverbial wisdom, "old wives' tales" and children's lore, historical legends and local customs, scurrilous versifying and scandalous rumour-mongering. Adam Fox argues that while the spoken word provides the most vivid insight into the mental world of the majority in this semi-literate society, it was by no means untouched by written influences. Even at the beginning of the period, centuries of reciprocal infusion between complementary media had created a cultural repertoire which had long ceased to be purely oral. Thereafter, the expansion of literacy together with the proliferation of texts both in manuscript and print saw the rapid acceleration and elaboration of this process. By 1700 popular traditions and modes of expression were the product of a fundamentally literate environment to a much greater extent than has yet been appreciated.
Release

Music in Everyday Life

Author: Tia DeNora

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521627320

Category: Music

Page: 181

View: 2195

The power of music to influence mood, create scenes, routines and occasions is widely recognised and this is reflected in a strand of social theory from Plato to Adorno that portrays music as an influence on character, social structure and action. There have, however, been few attempts to specify this power empirically and to provide theoretically grounded accounts of music's structuring properties in everyday experience. Music in Everyday Life uses a series of ethnographic studies - an aerobics class, karaoke evenings, music therapy sessions and the use of background music in the retail sector - as well as in-depth interviews to show how music is a constitutive feature of human agency. Drawing together concepts from psychology, sociology and socio-linguistics it develops a theory of music's active role in the construction of personal and social life and highlights the aesthetic dimension of social order and organisation in late modern societies.
Release

The Interpretation of Cultures

Author: Clifford Geertz

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0465093566

Category: Social Science

Page: 576

View: 5686

In The Interpretation of Cultures, the most original anthropologist of his generation moved far beyond the traditional confines of his discipline to develop an important new concept of culture. This groundbreaking book, winner of the 1974 Sorokin Award of the American Sociological Association, helped define for an entire generation of anthropologists what their field is ultimately about.
Release

Rising Tide

Gender Equality and Cultural Change Around the World

Author: Ronald Inglehart,Pippa Norris

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521529501

Category: Political Science

Page: 226

View: 3939

The twentieth century gave rise to profound changes in traditional sex roles. However, the force of this 'rising tide' has varied among rich and poor societies around the globe, as well as among younger and older generations. Rising Tide sets out to understand how modernization has changed cultural attitudes towards gender equality and to analyze the political consequences of this process. The core argument suggests that women and men's lives have been altered in a two-stage modernization process consisting of (i) the shift from agrarian to industrialized societies and (ii) the move from industrial towards post industrial societies. This book is the first to systematically compare attitudes towards gender equality worldwide, comparing almost 70 nations that run the gamut from rich to poor, agrarian to postindustrial. Rising Tide is essential reading for those interested in understanding issues of comparative politics, public opinion, political behavior, political development, and political sociology.
Release

Crime and Social Change in Middle England

Questions of Order in an English Town

Author: Evi Girling,Ian Loader,Richard Sparks

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113467175X

Category: Social Science

Page: 232

View: 5602

Crime and Social Change in Middle England offers a new way of looking at contemporary debates on the fear of crime. Using observation, interviews and documentary analysis it traces the reactions of citizens of one very ordinary town to events, conflicts and controversies around such topical subjects of criminological investigation as youth, public order, drugs, policing and home security in their community. In doing so it moves in place from comfortable suburbs to hard pressed inner city estates, from the affluent to the impoverished, from old people watching the town where they grew up change around them to young in-comers who are part of that change. This is a book which will give all students of crime a rare and fascinating insight into how issues at the heart of contemporary law and order politics both nationally and internationally actually play out on the ground.
Release

International News

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Foreign study

Page: N.A

View: 1700

Release

Uncivil Movements

The Armed Right Wing and Democracy in Latin America

Author: Leigh A. Payne

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780801862427

Category: Philosophy

Page: 297

View: 7908

Examining the experience of Latin American countries moving from authoritarianism to liberalization, Leigh Payne focuses on organized right-wing groups that take armed, often violent, action to destabilize emerging democratic governments. Although few social movement scholars include armed right-wing groups in their analyses, Payne points to the capacity of these groups to incorporate social movement discourse and practice in their own mobilization. She demonstrates how these uncivil movements gain power through political threats, cultural cues, and legitimating myths, developing their institutional skills to increase their political power in democracies. Payne offers three detailed case studies of uncivil movements in Latin America: the Argentine carapintada, military officers who staged four armed rebellions and later developed a fairly successful political party; the Brazilian UDR (Rural Democratic Union), a landlords' lobby that mobilized to defeat agrarian reform legislation while simultaneously engaging in violent confrontations with rural labor leaders and environmentalists; and the Nicaraguan Contras, who fought for ten years against the leftist Sandinista government. Payne conducted extensive interviews with members of these movements and with members of the civilian government itself, dramatically illustrating her case studies with the words of participants. She concludes with an extensive comparative analysis in order to show that uncivil movements are not unique to Latin America: they are a common feature of the transition and consolidation process of new democratic regimes. By examining three Latin American countries, Payne suggests ways in which new democraciesthroughout the world can lessen, if not neutralize, the influence of uncivil movements.
Release

Cultura política en América

Variaciones regionales y temporales

Author: Riccardo Forte,Natalia Silva Prada

Publisher: Casa Juan Pablos Centro Cultural

ISBN: N.A

Category: Political culture

Page: 220

View: 8521

Release