Of Butchers & Breeds

Report on Vertebrate Remains from Various Sites in the City of Lincoln

Author: Keith Dobney,Deborah Jaques,Brian G. Irving

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Excavations (Archaeology)

Page: 215

View: 9951

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The Oxford Handbook of Anglo-Saxon Archaeology

Author: Helena Hamerow,David A. Hinton,Sally Crawford

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0199212147

Category: Social Science

Page: 1112

View: 6636

Written by a team of experts and presenting the results of the most up-to-date research, The Handbook of Anglo-Saxon Archaeology will both stimulate and support further investigation into a society poised at the interface between prehistory and history.
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Vikings and the Danelaw

Author: James Graham-Campbell,Richard Hall,Judith Jesch,David N Parsons

Publisher:

ISBN: 1785704559

Category: History

Page: 386

View: 8434

A selection of papers from the 13th Viking Congress focusing on the northern, central, and eastern regions of Anglo-Saxon England colonised by invading Danish armies in the late 9th century, known as the Danelaw. This volume contributes to many of the unresolved scholarly debates surrounding the concept, and extent of the Danelaw.
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Roman Finds

Context and Theory

Author: Richard Hingley,Steven Willis

Publisher:

ISBN: 1785705032

Category: Social Science

Page: 254

View: 4698

Studies on finds in Roman Britain and the Western Provinces have come to greater prominence in the literature of recent years. The quality of such work has also improved, and is now theoretically informed, and based on rich data-sets. Work on finds over the last decade or two has changed our understanding of the Roman era in profound ways, and yet despite such encouraging advances and such clear worth, there has to date, been little in the way of a dedicated forum for the presentation and evaluation of current approaches to the study of material culture. The conference at which these papers were initially presented has gone some way to redressing this, and these papers bring the very latest studies on Roman finds to a wider audience. Twenty papers are here presented covering various themes.
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The Archaeology of the Lower City and Adjacent Suburbs

Author: Kate Steane,Margaret Darling,Michael J. Jones,Jenny Mann

Publisher: Oxbow Books

ISBN: 1782978550

Category: History

Page: 608

View: 4650

This volume contains reports on excavations undertaken in the lower walled city at Lincoln, which lies on sloping ground on the northern scarp of the Witham gap, and its adjacent suburbs between 1972 and 1987, and forms a companion volume to LAS volumes 2 and 3 which cover other parts of the historic city. The earliest features encountered were discovered both near to the line of Ermine Street and towards Broadgate. Remains of timber storage buildings were found, probably associated with the Roman legionary occupation in the later 1st century AD. The earliest occupation of the hillside after the foundation of the colonia towards the end of the century consisted mainly of commercial premises, modest residences, and storage buildings. It seems likely that the boundary of the lower enclosure was designated before it was fortified in the later 2nd century with the street pattern belonging to the earlier part of the century. Larger aristocratic residences came to dominate the hillside with public facilities fronting on to the line of the zigzagging main route. In the 4th century, the fortifications were enlarged and two new gates inserted. Examples of so-called ‘Dark Earth’ deposits were here dated to the very latest phases of Roman occupation. Elements of some Roman structures survived to be reused in subsequent centuries. There are hints of one focus in the Middle Saxon period, in the area of St. Peter’s church, but occupation of an urban nature did not recommence until the late 9th century with the first phases of Anglo-Scandinavian occupation recorded here. Sequences of increasingly intensive occupation from the 10th century were identified, with plentiful evidence for industrial activity, including pottery, metalworking and other, crafts, as well as parish churches. Markets were established in the 11th century and stone began to replace timber for residential structures from the mid-12th century with clear evidence of the quality of some of the houses. With the decline in the city’s fortunes from the late 13th century, the fringe sites became depopulated and there was much rebuilding elsewhere, including some fine new houses. There was a further revival in the later post-medieval period, but much of the earlier fabric, and surviving stretches of Roman city wall, were swept away in the 19th century.
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Feeding the Roman Army

The Archaeology of Production and Supply in NW Europe

Author: Richard Thomas

Publisher: Oxbow Books

ISBN: 1782975268

Category: History

Page: 169

View: 8228

These ten papers from two Theoretical Roman Archaeology Conference (2007) sessions bring together a growing body of new archaeological evidence in an attempt to reconsider the way in which the Roman army was provisioned. Clearly, the adequate supply of food was essential to the success of the Roman military. But what was the nature of those supply networks? Did the army rely on imperial supply lines from the continent, as certainly appears to be the case for some commodities, or were provisions requisitioned from local agricultural communities? If the latter was the case, was unsustainable pressure placed on such resources and how did local communities respond? Alternatively, did the early stages of conquest include not only the development of a military infrastructure, but also an effective supply-chain network based on contracts? Beyond the initial stages of conquest, how were provisioning arrangements maintained in the longer term, did supply chains remain static or did they change over time and, if so, what precipitated those changes? Addressing such questions is critical if we are to understand the nature of Roman conquest and the extent of interaction between indigenous communities and the Roman army. Case studies come from Roman Britain (Alchester, Cheshire, Dorset), France, the Netherlands and the Rhine Delta, looking at evidence from animal products, military settlements, the size of cattle, horses, pottery and salt. The editors also provide a review of current research and suggest a future agenda for economic and environmental research.
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Antiquity

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Archaeology

Page: N.A

View: 3279

Includes section "Reviews."
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Diet and Health in Past Animal Populations

Current Research and Future Directions

Author: International Council for Archaeozoology. Conference

Publisher: Oxbow Books Limited

ISBN: 9781842171172

Category: Social Science

Page: 134

View: 4610

Until recently, osteological studies into ancient diet and health have primarily focused upon human remains. As a result, these areas of research are still in their infancy in the field of zoo--archaeology. Animals have paid a heavy price for many major human advances, such as those in agriculture and transport. This use (and often abuse) of animals has left many tell-tale signs in their teeth and bones. Along with the many advantages in animal exploitation have also come major problems for humans. Thus, infectious diseases passed from animals to humans (zoo--noses) must have long played a significant evolutionary role in the development of society. The zooarchaeological record could provide an extremely important temporal framework for exploring and understanding past and current issues of human health and animal welfare. This volume provides one of the first contributions to the field, and may stimulate many more.
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Bones and the Man

Studies in Honour of Don Brothwell

Author: Don R. Brothwell

Publisher: Oxbow Books Limited

ISBN: 9781842170601

Category: Social Science

Page: 113

View: 3547

Papers presented in honour of the eminent archaeologist and paleopathologist, Don Brothwell. The papers are linked together by the theme of "People" - our evolution, our bodily remains and burial practices, and our behaviour with respect to other animals (particularly as it may be inferred form animal bones).
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The Archaeology of the Upper City and Adjacent Suburbs

Author: Kate Steane

Publisher: Oxbow Books Limited

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 311

View: 5817

This volume contains reports on sites excavated in the upper walled city at Lincoln and adjacent suburbs between 1972 and 1987. The project included large-scale excavations which yielded some stunning finds and revealed considerable information about several periods of the city's history. Each site is described in turn, incorporating stratigraphic, artefactual and environmental information, and the common threads are brought together in a general discussion. The excavators found remains of the defences of the Roman fortress, Roman houses, and the legionary headquarters, whose site was subsequently converted into a civic precinct. There were traces of occupation in the Early Saxon period, while the area outside the west gate has produced more pottery of the Mid-Saxon period (c.650-c.850) than any other in the city. Although there was renewed activity from the 10th century, full urbanisation of the upper city may not have happened until the late 11th century. There were already several churches before the Cathedral was begun in 1072, and the sequence of that at St Paul in the Bail is set out in detail. Several smaller excavations provided evidence for industrial activities such as malting, quarrying, and bell casting. Structural and artefactual evidence for the post-medieval period also give a flavour of the local life-style in the 16th-18th centuries. This work forms a companion volume to those on Wigford and the Brayford Pool (LAS 2) and The Lower Walled City (LAS 4).
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The Archaeology of Roman Towns

Studies in Honour of John S. Wacher

Author: J. S. Wacher,Peter R. Wilson

Publisher: Oxbow Books Limited

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 269

View: 490

These twenty-six papers written in honour of John Wacher take a new look at the towns of Roman Britain western Europe and beyond With subjects ranging from Ancyra to Wroxeter from urban art to waste water this collection complements Wacher's seminal publication Towns of Roman Britain (1974) and its companion volume The 'Small Towns' of Roman Britain (1990)
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Settlement, burial and industry in Roman Godmanchester

excavations in the extra-mural area ; The Parks 1998, London Road 1997-8, and other investigations

Author: Alex Jones

Publisher: British Archaeological Reports Ltd

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 229

View: 6846

This volume reports on two main excavations at The Parks (1998) and London Road (1997-1998) carried out in Godmanchester (Cambridgeshire), plus a series of other smaller investigations. Excavations at both sites revealed prehistoric activity although the main focus was on the Romano-British evidence. At The Parks this included a 4th-century cemetery, evidence for early Romano-British land-division and 2nd- to 3rd-century pottery production, and at London Road evidence was revealed for ditched enclosures, a timber-framed building and industrial and livestock activities. A general overview and synthesis of the evidence, which includes a series of small finds, pottery and environmental reports, is given at then end.
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Salt, life and industry

excavations at King Street, Middlewich, Cheshire, 2001-2002

Author: Matthew Williams,Malcolm L. Reid

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781407302614

Category: Social Science

Page: 199

View: 9443

This report describes the results of a developer-funded excavation undertaken in 2001 and 2002 in Middlewich, Cheshire, north-eastern England, prior to the development of the site for housing. Middlewich is located 33km east of Chester, on the Cheshire plain and to the south of the confluence of the Rivers Dane and Croco. The Croco was straightened when the Trent and Mersey canal was constructed in the 1770s. The modern town is also bounded to the west by the River Wheelock. Contents: Chapter 1 - Introduction by Malcolm Reid and Matthew Williams; Chapter 2 - The Excavation by Malcolm Reid and Matthew Williams; Chapter 3 - Coins by David Shotter; Chapter 4 - Brooches by Imogen Wellington; Chapter 5 - Other Copper Alloy Objects and an Iron Chain by Gillian Dunn; Chapter 6 - Lead Artefacts and Lead Manufacturing Waste by Jane Cowgill; Chapter 7 - Slag and Related Material by Jane Cowgill; Chapter 8 - Glass by Sally Worrell; Chapter 9 - Coarse Pottery by Ruth Leary; Chapter 10 - Samian Pottery by Margaret Ward; Chapter 11 - Briquetage by Matthew Williams; Chapter 12 - Wooden Artefacts by Michael Bamforth; Chapter 13 - Leather Objects by Quita Mould; Chapter 14 - Animal Bone by Sarah Viner; Chapter 15 - Archaeobotanical Remains by Gaylnne Carter; Chapter 16 - General Conclusions by Malcolm Reid.
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The City by the Pool

Assessing the Archaeology of the City of Lincoln

Author: Michael J. Jones,A. G. Vince

Publisher: Oxbow Books Limited

ISBN: 9781842171073

Category: History

Page: 424

View: 8554

CD Rom in rear pocket.
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