Native Activism in Cold War America

The Struggle for Sovereignty

Author: Daniel M. Cobb

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 306

View: 658

Broadens the scope and meaning of American Indian political activism by focusing on the movement's early--and largely neglected--struggles, revealing how early activists exploited Cold War tensions in ways that brought national attention to their issues.
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From Wounded Knee to Checkpoint Charlie

The Alliance for Sovereignty between American Indians and Central Europeans in the Late Cold War

Author: György Ferenc Tóth

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 1438461216

Category: Social Science

Page: 325

View: 6620

A historical analysis of the transatlantic relations of the American Indian radical sovereignty movement of the late Cold War. From Wounded Knee to Checkpoint Charlie examines the history of the transatlantic alliance between American Indian sovereignty activists and Central European solidarity groups, and their entry into the United Nations in the 1970s and 1980s. In the late Cold War, Native American activists engaged in transnational diplomacy for nation building by putting outside pressure on the US government for a more progressive Indian policy that reached for the full decolonization of Native American communities into independence. By using extensive multinational archival research complemented by interviews, György Ferenc Tóth investigates how older transatlantic images of American Indians influenced the alliance between Native activists and Central European groups, how this coalition developed and functioned, and how the US government and the regimes of the Eastern Bloc responded to this transatlantic alliance. This book not only places the American Indian radical sovereignty movement in an international context, but also recasts it as a transnational struggle, thus connecting domestic US social and political history to the history of Cold War transatlantic relations and global movements.
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Why You Can't Teach United States History without American Indians

Author: Susan Sleeper-Smith,Juliana Barr,Jean M. O'Brien,Nancy Shoemaker

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469621215

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 8030

A resource for all who teach and study history, this book illuminates the unmistakable centrality of American Indian history to the full sweep of American history. The nineteen essays gathered in this collaboratively produced volume, written by leading scholars in the field of Native American history, reflect the newest directions of the field and are organized to follow the chronological arc of the standard American history survey. Contributors reassess major events, themes, groups of historical actors, and approaches--social, cultural, military, and political--consistently demonstrating how Native American people, and questions of Native American sovereignty, have animated all the ways we consider the nation's past. The uniqueness of Indigenous history, as interwoven more fully in the American story, will challenge students to think in new ways about larger themes in U.S. history, such as settlement and colonization, economic and political power, citizenship and movements for equality, and the fundamental question of what it means to be an American. Contributors are Chris Andersen, Juliana Barr, David R. M. Beck, Jacob Betz, Paul T. Conrad, Mikal Brotnov Eckstrom, Margaret D. Jacobs, Adam Jortner, Rosalyn R. LaPier, John J. Laukaitis, K. Tsianina Lomawaima, Robert J. Miller, Mindy J. Morgan, Andrew Needham, Jean M. O'Brien, Jeffrey Ostler, Sarah M. S. Pearsall, James D. Rice, Phillip H. Round, Susan Sleeper-Smith, and Scott Manning Stevens.
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American Indians in U.S. History

Author: Roger L. Nichols

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 0806181443

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 6919

This one-volume narrative history of American Indians in the United States traces the experiences of indigenous peoples from early colonial times to the present day, demonstrating how Indian existence has varied and changed throughout our nation’s history. Although popular opinion and standard histories often depict tribal peoples as victims of U.S. aggression, that is only a part of their story. In American Indians in U.S. History, Roger L. Nichols focuses on the ideas, beliefs, and actions of American Indian individuals and tribes, showing them to be significant agents in their own history. Designed as a brief survey for students and general readers, this volume addresses the histories of tribes throughout the entire United States. Offering readers insight into broad national historical patterns, it explores the wide variety of tribes and relates many fascinating stories of individual and tribal determination, resilience, and long-term success. Charting Indian history in roughly chronological chapters, Nichols presents the central issues tribal leaders faced during each era and demonstrates that, despite their frequently changing status, American Indians have maintained their cultures, identities, and many of their traditional lifeways. Far from “vanishing” or disappearing into the “melting pot,” American Indians have struggled for sovereignty and are today a larger, stronger part of the U.S. population than they have been in several centuries.
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Making Seafood Sustainable

American Experiences in Global Perspective

Author: Mansel G. Blackford

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812206274

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 5032

In the spring of 2007, National Geographic warned, "The oceans are in deep blue trouble. From the northernmost reaches of the Greenland Sea to the swirl of the Antarctic Circle, we are gutting our seas of fish." There were legitimate grounds for concern. After increasing more than fourfold between 1950 and 1994, the global wild fish catch reached a plateau and stagnated despite exponential growth in the fishing industry. As numerous scientific reports showed, many fish stocks around the world collapsed, creating a genuine global overfishing crisis. Making Seafood Sustainable analyzes the ramifications of overfishing for the United States by investigating how fishers, seafood processors, retailers, government officials, and others have worked together to respond to the crisis. Historian Mansel G. Blackford examines how these players took steps to make fishing in some American waters, especially in Alaskan waters, sustainable. Critical to these efforts, Blackford argues, has been government and industry collaboration in formulating and enforcing regulations. What can be learned from these successful experiences? Are they applicable elsewhere? What are the drawbacks? Making Seafood Sustainable addresses these questions and suggests that sustainable seafood management can be made to work. The economic and social costs incurred in achieving sustainable resource usage are significant, but there are ways to mitigate them. More broadly, this study illustrates ways to manage commonly held natural resources around the world—land, water, oil, and so on—in sustainable ways.
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"We Are Still Here"

American Indians Since 1890

Author: Peter Iverson,Wade Davies

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118751701

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 812

In addition to revisions and updates, the second edition of“We Are Still Here” features new material,seeing this well-loved American History Series volume maintain itstreatment of American Indians in the 20th century whileextending its coverage into the opening decades of the21st century. Provides student and general readers concise and engagingcoverage of contemporary history of American Indians contributed bytop scholars and instructors in the field Represents an ideal supplement to any U.S. or Native Americansurvey text Includes a completely up-to-date synthesis of the most currentliterature in the field Features a comprehensive Bibliographical Essay that serves toaid student research and writing Covers American Indian history from 1890 through 2013
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Power to the Poor

Black-Brown Coalition and the Fight for Economic Justice, 1960-1974

Author: Gordon K. Mantler

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469608065

Category: Social Science

Page: 376

View: 1957

The Poor People's Campaign of 1968 has long been overshadowed by the assassination of its architect, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and the political turmoil of that year. In a major reinterpretation of civil rights and Chicano movement history, Gordon K. Mantler demonstrates how King's unfinished crusade became the era's most high-profile attempt at multiracial collaboration and sheds light on the interdependent relationship between racial identity and political coalition among African Americans and Mexican Americans. Mantler argues that while the fight against poverty held great potential for black-brown cooperation, such efforts also exposed the complex dynamics between the nation's two largest minority groups. Drawing on oral histories, archives, periodicals, and FBI surveillance files, Mantler paints a rich portrait of the campaign and the larger antipoverty work from which it emerged, including the labor activism of Cesar Chavez, opposition of Black and Chicano Power to state violence in Chicago and Denver, and advocacy for Mexican American land-grant rights in New Mexico. Ultimately, Mantler challenges readers to rethink the multiracial history of the long civil rights movement and the difficulty of sustaining political coalitions.
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Reimagining Indian Country

Native American Migration and Identity in Twentieth-Century Los Angeles

Author: Nicolas G. Rosenthal

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807869996

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 3599

For decades, most American Indians have lived in cities, not on reservations or in rural areas. Still, scholars, policymakers, and popular culture often regard Indians first as reservation peoples, living apart from non-Native Americans. In this book, Nicolas Rosenthal reorients our understanding of the experience of American Indians by tracing their migration to cities, exploring the formation of urban Indian communities, and delving into the shifting relationships between reservations and urban areas from the early twentieth century to the present. With a focus on Los Angeles, which by 1970 had more Native American inhabitants than any place outside the Navajo reservation, Reimagining Indian Country shows how cities have played a defining role in modern American Indian life and examines the evolution of Native American identity in recent decades. Rosenthal emphasizes the lived experiences of Native migrants in realms including education, labor, health, housing, and social and political activism to understand how they adapted to an urban environment, and to consider how they formed--and continue to form--new identities. Though still connected to the places where indigenous peoples have preserved their culture, Rosenthal argues that Indian identity must be understood as dynamic and fully enmeshed in modern global networks.
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Memory Matters

Proceedings from the 2010 Conference Hosted by the Humanities Center, Miami University of Ohio

Author: Daniel M. Cobb

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 1438438338

Category: HISTORY

Page: 66

View: 2939

Explores how the process of memorialization keeps the past alive in the present and shapes the way we imagine our possible futures.
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Community Self-Determination

American Indian Education in Chicago, 1952-2006

Author: John J. Laukaitis

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 1438457707

Category: Social Science

Page: 282

View: 8893

Examines the educational programs American Indians developed to preserve their cultural and ethnic identity, improve their livelihood, and serve the needs of their youth in Chicago. After World War II, American Indians began relocating to urban areas in large numbers, in search of employment. Partly influenced by the Bureau of Indian Affairs, this migration from rural reservations to metropolitan centers presented both challenges and opportunities. This history examines the educational programs American Indians developed in Chicago and gives particular attention to how the American Indian community chose its own distinct path within and outside of the larger American Indian self-determination movement. In what John J. Laukaitis terms community self-determination, American Indians in Chicago demonstrated considerable agency as they developed their own programs and worked within already existent institutions. The community-based initiatives included youth programs at the American Indian Center and St. Augustine’s Center for American Indians, the Native American Committee’s Adult Learning Center, Little Big Horn High School, O-Wai-Ya-Wa Elementary School, Native American Educational Services College, and the Institute for Native American Development at Truman College. Community Self-Determination presents the first major examination of these initiatives and programs and provides an understanding of how education functioned as a form of activism for Chicago’s American Indian community. “John Laukaitis has produced an important book on the role of education in the Chicago American Indian community. His meticulous research in a wide array of manuscript collections and extensive oral interviews clearly convey to readers that he knows the city, knows the places, and knows the people.” — Daniel M. Cobb, author of Native Activism in Cold War America: The Struggle for Sovereignty
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Kesselrings letzte Schlacht.

Kriegsverbrecherprozesse, Vergangenheitspolitik und Wiederbewaffnung: Der Fall Kesselring.

Author: Kerstin von Lingen

Publisher: Verlag Ferd.Sch├╢ningh GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: N.A

Category: War criminals

Page: 392

View: 2102

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Gott ist rot

Author: Vine Deloria

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783889774590

Category:

Page: 191

View: 5233

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Formen, die der kapitalistischen Produktion vorhergehen

Author: Karl Marx

Publisher: BoD – Books on Demand

ISBN: 3843043957

Category: Fiction

Page: 52

View: 2958

Karl Marx: Formen, die der kapitalistischen Produktion vorhergehen Auszug aus den ökonomischen Manuskripten der Jahre 1857/58, die erstmals 1939 unter dem Titel »Grundrisse der Kritik der politischen Ökonomie« veröffentlicht wurden (Moskau 1939). – Die eckigen Klammern bei Marx wurden durch geschweifte Klammern ersetzt. Vollständige Neuausgabe. Herausgegeben von Karl-Maria Guth. Berlin 2014. Textgrundlage ist die Ausgabe: Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels: Werke. Herausgegeben vom Institut für Marxismus-Leninismus beim ZK der SED, 43 Bände, Band 42, Berlin: Dietz-Verlag, 1983. Die Paginierung obiger Ausgabe wird in dieser Neuausgabe als Marginalie zeilengenau mitgeführt. Umschlaggestaltung von Thomas Schultz-Overhage. Gesetzt aus Minion Pro, 12 pt.
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Homo sacer

Die souveräne Macht und das nackte Leben

Author: Giorgio Agamben

Publisher: Suhrkamp Verlag

ISBN: 351878420X

Category: Philosophy

Page: 224

View: 3935

Der homo sacer ist die Verkörperung einer archaischen römischen Rechtsfigur: Zwar durfte er straflos getötet, nicht aber geopfert werden, was auch seine Tötung sinnlos und ihn gleichsam unberührbar machte – woraus sich der Doppelsinn von sacer als ›verflucht‹ und ›geheiligt‹ ableitet. Giorgio Agamben stellt im Anschluß an Foucault und als philosophische Korrektur von dessen Konzept der Biopolitik die These auf, daß Biopolitik, indem sie den Menschen auf einen biologischen Nullwert zurückzuführen versucht, das nackte Leben zum eigentlichen Subjekt der Moderne macht. Ausgehend von Carl Schmitts Souveränitätskonzept, kommt Agamben zu einer Interpretation des Konzentrationslagers als »nomos der Moderne«, wo Recht und Tat, Regel und Ausnahme, Leben und Tod ununterscheidbar werden. In den zwischen Leben und Tod siechenden Häftlingen, aber auch in den Flüchtlingen von heute sieht er massenhaft real gewordene Verkörperungen des homo sacer und des nackten Lebens. Die philosophische Begründung dessen, daß diese Möglichkeit keineswegs nur historisch ist, hat eine Diskussion entfacht, die weit über Italien und Europa hinausreicht.
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Warfare Welfare

The Not-So-Hidden Costs of America's Permanent War Economy

Author: N.A

Publisher: Potomac Books, Inc.

ISBN: 1597975702

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 288

View: 6840

This edited volume reveals how a permanent war economy has made the United States unable to spread democracy abroad and has worsened domestic problems. The editors draw from classical readings in political theory, from primary documents (including key court decisions), and from social science research to analyze such issues as the effect of militarization and combativeness on the everyday lives of Americans. The editors also address the dire connection among banking losses, the housing recession, the welfare/national security state, and the challenge of rebuilding AmericaÆs infrastructure.
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