Muckraker

The Scandalous Life and Times of W. T. Stead, Britain's First Investigative Journalist

Author: W. Sydney Robinson

Publisher: Biteback Publishing

ISBN: 1849543887

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 1198

A major work by a brilliant young biographer, Muckraker details the tenacity and verve of one of Victorian Britain's most compelling characters. Credited with pioneering investigative reporting, W. T. Stead made a career of 'muckraking': revealing horrific practices in the hope of shocking authorities into reform. As the editor of the Northern Echo, he won the admiration of the Liberal statesman William Gladstone for his fierce denunciation of the Conservative government; at the helm of London's most ininfuential evening paper, the Pall Mall Gazette, he launched the career-defining Maiden Tribute campaign. To expose the scandal of child prostitution, Stead abducted thirteen-year-old Eliza Armstrong (thought by many to be the inspiration behind Eliza Doolittle, from friend George Bernard Shaw's Pygmalion), thrusting him into a life of notoriety. Labelled a madman in later life for dabbling in the occult, W. T. Stead conducted his life with an invincible zeal right up until his tragic demise aboard the Titanic. Revealing a man full of curious eccentricities, W. Sydney Robinson charts the remarkable rise and fall of a true Fleet Street legend in this enthralling biography.
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The Armstrong Girl

A child for sale: the battle against Victorian sex trade

Author: Cathy Le Feuvre

Publisher: Lion Books

ISBN: 074596821X

Category: Religion

Page: 288

View: 5066

In November 1885 Victorian England was scandalised by a court case which lifted the veil on prostitution and the sex trade. In the Old Bailey dock was the editor of the Pall Mall Gazette, which had recently published a series of articles on the sex trade; a reformed brothel keeper; and the second-in-command of The Salvation Army, Bramwell Booth. The group was accused of abducting a 13 year old girl, Eliza Armstrong. The group had set up the scheme to expose the trade in young girls. The resulting scandal triggered a massive petition and the raising of the Age of Consent from 13 to 16. Many MPs and other men in positions of power were furious, and the campaigners were indicted under the 1861 Abduction Act. Booth would be acquitted, but others went to prison, martyrs for justice. The Armstrong Girl is the story of that scandal, and of the Christians who fought for this essential change in the law.
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The Routledge Companion to British Media History

Author: Martin Conboy,John Steel

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317629469

Category: Social Science

Page: 628

View: 1004

The Routledge Companion to British Media History provides a comprehensive exploration of how different media have evolved within social, regional and national contexts. The 50 chapters in this volume, written by an outstanding team of internationally respected scholars, bring together current debates and issues within media history in this era of rapid change, and also provide students and researchers with an essential collection of comparable media histories. The first two parts of the Companion comprise a series of thematic chapters reflecting broadly on historiography, providing historical context for discussions of the power of the media and their social importance, arranged in the following sections: Media History Debates Media and Society The subsequent parts are made up of in-depth sections on different media formats, exploring various approaches to historicizing media futures, divided as follows: Newspapers Magazines Radio Film Television Digital Media The Routledge Companion to British Media History provides an essential guide to key ideas, issues, concepts and debates in the field. Chapter 40 of this book is freely available as a downloadable Open Access PDF at www.tandfebooks.com/openaccess. It has been made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives 3.0 license.
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Secret Commissions

An Anthology of Victorian Investigative Journalism

Author: Stephen Donovan,Matthew Rubery

Publisher: Broadview Press

ISBN: 1770483535

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 320

View: 4950

Lurid, controversial, and vulnerable to accusations of titillation or rabble-rousing, the works of Victorian investigative journalism collected here nonetheless brought unseen suffering into the light of day. Even today their exposure has the power to shock. As one investigator promised, “The Report of our Secret Commission will be read to-day with a shuddering horror that will thrill throughout the world.” Secret Commissions brings together nineteen key documents of Victorian investigative journalism. Their authors range from well-known writers such as Charles Dickens, Henry Mayhew, and W.T. Stead to now-forgotten names such as Hugh Shimmin, Elizabeth Banks, and Olive Malvery. Collectively, they show how unsparing descriptions of social injustice became regular features of English journalism long before the advent of American-style “muckraking.” The reports address topics as varied as child abuse, animal cruelty, juvenile prostitution, sweat-shops, slums, gypsies, abortion, infanticide, and other controversial social issues. The collection features detailed chapter introductions, original illustrations, a historical overview of investigative reporting in the nineteenth-century press, and suggestions for further reading.
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Journalism and the Periodical Press in Nineteenth-Century Britain

Author: Joanne Shattock

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 110708573X

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 448

View: 6132

Newly commissioned essays by leading scholars offer a comprehensive and authoritative overview of the diversity, range and impact of the newspaper and periodical press in nineteenth-century Britain. Essays range from studies of periodical formats in the nineteenth century - reviews, magazines and newspapers - to accounts of individual journalists, many of them eminent writers of the day. The uneasy relationship between the new 'profession' of journalism and the evolving profession of authorship is investigated, as is the impact of technological innovations, such as the telegraph, the typewriter and new processes of illustration. Contributors go on to consider the transnational and global dimensions of the British press and its impact in the rest of the world. As digitisation of historical media opens up new avenues of research, the collection reveals the centrality of the press to our understanding of the nineteenth century.
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British Politics, Society and Empire, 1852-1945

Essays in Honour of Trevor O. Lloyd

Author: David W. Gutzke

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1315387131

Category: History

Page: 200

View: 9866

This book draws together essays on modern British history, empire, liberalism and conservatism in honour of Trevor O. Lloyd, Emeritus Professor of Modern British history at the University of Toronto for some thirty years beginning in the 1960s. With Lloyd best known for his two histories of the Empire and of domestic Britain, published in the Short Oxford History of the Modern World series, as well as his pioneering psephological study of the 1880 General Election, the essays include analyses of Anglo-Irish relations, Florence Nightingale, Canada, muckrackers, the Primrose League and prisoners of war during World War II.
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Bernard Shaw, W. T. Stead, and the New Journalism

Whitechapel, Parnell, Titanic, and the Great War

Author: Nelson O'Ceallaigh Ritschel

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319490079

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 238

View: 6593

This book explores Bernard Shaw’s journalism from the mid-1880s through the Great War—a period in which Shaw contributed some of the most powerful and socially relevant journalism the western world has experienced. In approaching Shaw’s journalism, the promoter and abuser of the New Journalism, W. T. Stead, is contrasted to Shaw, as Shaw countered the sensational news copy Stead and his disciples generated. To understand Shaw’s brand of New Journalism, his responses to the popular press’ portrayals of high profile historical crises are examined, while other examples prompting Shaw’s journalism over the period are cited for depth: the 1888 Whitechapel murders, the 1890-91 O’Shea divorce scandal that fell Charles Stewart Parnell, peace crusades within militarism, the catastrophic Titanic sinking, and the Great War. Through Shaw’s journalism that undermined the popular press’ shock efforts that prevented rational thought, Shaw endeavored to promote clear thinking through the immediacy of his critical journalism. Arguably, Shaw saved the free press.
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W. T. Stead

Newspaper Revolutionary

Author: Laurel Brake,Ed King,Roger Luckhurst,James Mussell

Publisher: British Library Board

ISBN: 9780712358668

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 232

View: 3207

When William T. Stead died on the Titanic in 1912, he was the most famous Englishman on board. A political radical and Christian, he was also a spiritualist who took dictation of the dead. This book of essays, marking the centenary of his death, seeks to recover the story of an extraordinary figure in late Victorian and Edwardian culture.
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The Last Victorians

A Daring Reassessment of Four Twentieth Century Eccentrics

Author: W. Sydney Robinson

Publisher: Biteback Publishing

ISBN: 1849547718

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 8404

Ever since the publication of Lytton Strachey's Eminent Victorians in 1918 it has been fashionable to ridicule the great figures of the nineteenth century. From the longreigning monarch herself to the celebrated writers, philanthropists and politicians of the day, the Victorians have been dismissed as hypocrites and frauds - or worse. Yet not everyone in the twentieth century agreed with Strachey and his followers. To a handful of eccentrics born during Victoria's reign, the nineteenth century remained the greatest era in human history: a time of high culture for the wealthy, 'improvement' for the poor, and enlightened imperial rule for the 400 million inhabitants of the British Empire. They were, to friend and foe alike, 'the last Victorians' - relics of a bygone civilisation. In this daring group biography, W. Sydney Robinson explores the extraordinary lives of four of these Victorian survivors: the 'Puritan Home Secretary', William Joynson-Hicks (1865-1932); the 'Gloomy Dean' of St Paul's Cathedral, W. R. Inge (1860-1954); the belligerent founder of the BBC, John Reith (1889-1971), and the ultra-patriotic popular historian and journalist Arthur Bryant (1899- 1985). While revealing their manifold foibles and eccentricities, Robinson argues that these figures were truly great - even in error.
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Speak Well of Me: The Authorised Biography of Ronald Harwood

The Authorised Biography of Ronald Harwood

Author: W. Sydney Robinson

Publisher: Oberon Books

ISBN: 1786820447

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 272

View: 4769

Talk of me sometimes. Speak well of me. Actors live on only in the memory of others. Speak well of me.’ The Dresser, Act Two Ronald Harwood is one of the foremost playwrights and screenplay writers alive today. He has won an Oscar for his adaptation of The Pianist, a BAFTA for The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, and has been celebrated in the theatre for his classic play, The Dresser, which has been adapted for both television and cinema – most recently in a BBC production starring Ian McKellen and Anthony Hopkins. His life has been one of adventure and achievement. He was born Ronald Horwitz, the youngest child of a poor South African couple, Ike and Bella, originally from Lithuania and East London respectively. After developing a love of the West End through inspirational teachers and battered copies of a magazine called Theatre World of an interview at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in 1951. Subsequently he joined the theatre company of the famous actor-manager Donald Wolfit, who would later provide the inspiration for the central character of The Dresser This book is not only aimed at lovers of cinema and theatre, but also readers who are interested in the human struggle of a man who has overcome great obstacles to achieve success in his chosen field. It explores some of the moral dilemmas which Harwood has faced in his own lifetime, from the guilt of having accepted the apartheid system while growing up in South Africa to his decision to collaborate on two occasions with the controversial film director Roman Polanski. Speak Well of Me is a biography based on a series of interviews with Ronald Harwood, as well as extensive study of his press-cuttings and personal papers. Many of his contemporaries, including Tom Stoppard, Arnold Wesker, Antonia Fraser, Tom Courtenay and Antony Sher have also shared their memories with the author.
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If Christ Came to Chicago!

A Plea for the Union of All who Love in the Service of All who Suffer

Author: William Thomas Stead

Publisher: Chicago : Laird & Lee

ISBN: N.A

Category: Chicago (Ill.)

Page: 460

View: 9312

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China

A New History, Second Enlarged Edition

Author: John King Fairbank,Merle Goldman

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674036654

Category: Reference

Page: 560

View: 420

John King Fairbank was the West's doyen on China, and this book is the full and final expression of his lifelong engagement with this vast ancient civilization. The distinguished historian Merle Goldman brings the book up to date and provides an epilogue discussing the changes in contemporary China that will shape the nation in the years to come.
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The Pen and the Sword

Press, War, and Terror in the 21st Century

Author: Calvin F. Exoo

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 141295360X

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 233

View: 4272

'Challenges students to reexamine their beliefs about the news media, helping them to become more critical citizens. In doing this, the text engages students' attention in crucial developments in the media, in politics, and in the intersection of the two' - Paul R. Brewer, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Recent content analysis shows that terrorism and international conflict--the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq--have been the number one story of American news since 9/11. The Pen and the Sword is the first comprehensive review of how the news media have covered--and are covering--these momentous events. This coverage is used throughout the book to introduce and to illustrate a critical perspective on the mass media, examining contemporary issues of media economics, politics, and public opinion.
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Syndromes of Corruption

Wealth, Power, and Democracy

Author: Michael Johnston

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139448451

Category: Political Science

Page: N.A

View: 9615

Corruption is a threat to democracy and economic development in many societies. It arises in the ways people pursue, use and exchange wealth and power, and in the strength or weakness of the state, political and social institutions that sustain and restrain those processes. Differences in these factors, Michael Johnston argues, give rise to four major syndromes of corruption: Influence Markets, Elite Cartels, Oligarchs and Clans, and Official Moguls. In this 2005 book, Johnston uses statistical measures to identify societies in each group, and case studies to show that the expected syndromes do arise. Countries studied include the United States, Japan and Germany (Influence Markets); Italy, Korea and Botswana (Elite Cartels); Russia, the Philippines and Mexico (Oligarchs and Clans); and China, Kenya, and Indonesia (Offical Moguls). A concluding chapter explores reform, emphasising the ways familiar measures should be applied - or withheld, lest they do harm - with an emphasis upon the value of 'deep democratisation'.
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Du Pont Dynasty

Behind the Nylon Curtain

Author: Gerard Colby

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 1453220887

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 965

View: 6913

Award-winning journalist Gerard Colby takes readers behind the scenes of one of America’s most powerful and enduring corporations; now with a new introduction by the author Their name is everywhere. America’s wealthiest industrial family by far and a vast financial power, the Du Ponts, from their mansions in northern Delaware’s “Chateau Country,” have long been leaders in the relentless drive to turn the United States into a plutocracy. The Du Pont story in this country began in 1800. Éleuthère Irénée du Pont, official keeper of the gunpowder of corrupt King Louis XVI, fled from revolutionary France to America. Two years later he founded the gunpowder company that called itself “America’s armorer”—and that President Wilson’s secretary of war called a “species of outlaws” for war profiteering. Du Pont Dynasty introduces many colorful characters, including “General” Henry du Pont, who profited from the Civil War to build the Gunpowder Trust, one of the first corporate monopolies; Alfred I. du Pont, betrayed by his cousins and pushed out of the organization, landing in social exile as the powerful “Count of Florida”; the three brothers who expanded Du Pont’s control to General Motors, fought autoworkers’ right to unionize, and then launched a family tradition of waging campaigns to destroy FDR’s New Deal regulatory reforms; Governor Pete du Pont, who ran for president and backed Newt Gingrich’s 1994 Republican Revolution; and Irving S. Shapiro, the architect of Du Pont’s ongoing campaign to undermine effective environmental regulation. From plans to force President Roosevelt from office, to munitions sales to warlords and the rising Nazis, to Freon’s damage to the planet’s life-protecting ozone layer, to the manufacture of deadly gases and the covered-up poisoning of Du Pont workers, to the reputation the company earned for being the worst polluter of America’s air and water, the Du Pont reign has been dappled with scandal for centuries. Culled from years of painstaking research and interviews, this fully documented book unfolds like a novel. Laying bare the bitter feuds, power plays, smokescreens, and careless unaccountability that erupted in murder, Colby pulls back the curtain on a dynasty whose formidable influence continues to this day. Suppressed in myriad ways and the subject of the author’s landmark federal lawsuit, Du Pont Dynasty is an essential history of the United States.
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A People's History of the United States

1492-Present

Author: Howard Zinn

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317325303

Category: History

Page: 744

View: 760

This is a new edition of the radical social history of America from Columbus to the present. This powerful and controversial study turns orthodox American history upside down to portray the social turmoil behind the "march of progress". Known for its lively, clear prose as well as its scholarly research, A People's History is the only volume to tell America's story from the point of view of - and in the words of - America's women, factory workers, African-Americans, Native Americans, the working poor, and immigrant laborers. As historian Howard Zinn shows, many of America's greatest battles - the fights for fair wage, an eight-hour workday, child-labor laws, health and safety standards, universal suffrage, women's rights, racial equality - were carried out at the grassroots level, against bloody resistance. Covering Christopher Columbus's arrival through the Clinton years A People's History of the United States, which was nominated for the American Book Award in 1981, is an insightful analysis of the most important events in US history.
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The Invention of International Crime

A Global Issue in the Making, 1881–1914

Author: P. Knepper

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230251129

Category: History

Page: 254

View: 4958

We live in the age of international crime but when did it begin? This book examines the period when crime became an international issue (1881-1914), exploring issues such as 'world-shrinking' changes in transportation, communication and commerce, and concerns about alien criminality, white slave trading and anarchist outrages.
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Corruption and Reform

Lessons from America's Economic History

Author: Edward L. Glaeser,Claudia Goldin

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226299597

Category: History

Page: 396

View: 4805

Despite recent corporate scandals, the United States is among the world’s least corrupt nations. But in the nineteenth century, the degree of fraud and corruption in America approached that of today’s most corrupt developing nations, as municipal governments and robber barons alike found new ways to steal from taxpayers and swindle investors. In Corruption and Reform, contributors explore this shadowy period of United States history in search of better methods to fight corruption worldwide today. Contributors to this volume address the measurement and consequences of fraud and corruption and the forces that ultimately led to their decline within the United States. They show that various approaches to reducing corruption have met with success, such as deregulation, particularly “free banking,” in the 1830s. In the 1930s, corruption was kept in check when new federal bureaucracies replaced local administrations in doling out relief. Another deterrent to corruption was the independent press, which kept a watchful eye over government and business. These and other facets of American history analyzed in this volume make it indispensable as background for anyone interested in corruption today.
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Encyclopedia of Pulp Fiction Writers

Author: Lee Server

Publisher: Infobase Publishing

ISBN: 1438109121

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 321

View: 8102

Provides an introduction to American pulp fiction during the twentieth century with brief author biographies and lists of their works.
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