Geotourism

Author: Ross Kingston Dowling,David Newsome

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0750662158

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 260

View: 8656

Geotourism is tourism surroounding geological attractions and destinations. This unique text uses a wealth of case studies to discuss the issues involved in the management and care of such attractions, covering topics such as sustainability, impacts and environmental issues. Geotourism: Sustainability, impacts and management leads the reader logically through the process, covering both the theories involved and the practicalities of managing such 'environmentally precious' attractions. * Looks at the challenges of management strategies and frameworks to address the provision of sustainability in areas of geological attractions, offering practical solutions. * Uses in-depth examples and global case studies from the UK, Australia, Africa, New Zealand and the US (amongst others) to examine from international, national and local perspectives. * Considers future directions and challenges.
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The History of Geoconservation

Author: Cynthia V. Burek,Colin D. Prosser

Publisher: Geological Society of London

ISBN: 9781862392540

Category: Science

Page: 312

View: 3043

This book is the first to describe the history of geoconservation. It draws on experience from the UK, Europe and further afield, to explore topics including: what is geoconservation; where, when and how did it start; who was responsible; and how has it differed across the world? Geological and geomorphological features, processes, sites and specimens, provide a resource of immense scientific and educational importance. They also form the foundation for the varied and spectacular landscapes that help define national and local identity as well as many of the great tourism destinations. Mankind's activities, including contributing to enhanced climate change, pose many threats to this resource: the importance of safeguarding and managing it for future generations is now widely accepted as part of sustainable development. Geoconservation is an established and growing activity across the world, with more participants and a greater profile than ever before. This volume highlights a history of challenges, set-backs, successes and visionary individuals and provides a sound basis for taking geoconservation into the future.
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Geological and landscape conservation

proceedings of the Malvern International Conference 1993

Author: Des O'Halloran,Geological Society of London

Publisher: Geological Society Publishing House

ISBN: N.A

Category: Science

Page: 530

View: 5432

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British Silurian stratigraphy

Author: Richard John Aldridge,Joint Nature Conservation Committee

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Science

Page: 542

View: 4676

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Fossil Arthropods of Great Britain

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Arthropoda, Fossil

Page: 294

View: 8546

The species of Arthropods is accorded a special status in the GCR series because of the rarity of the fossils. This volume addresses the evolution and diversity of this animal group. The rarer arthropods - and the sites from which the fossils were recovered are described here.
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Report

Author: Institute of Geological Sciences (Great Britain)

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780118840675

Category: Geology

Page: 24

View: 5983

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Report

Author: Nature Conservancy Council (Great Britain)

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Conservation of natural resources

Page: N.A

View: 2910

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Merrill's Marauders

The Untold Story of Unit Galahad and the Toughest Special Forces Mission of World War II

Author: Gavin Mortimer

Publisher: Zenith Press

ISBN: 0760344329

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 6284

From late 1941 through 1942, Japan overran much of the Pacific, including Burma. In March 1943, British Gen. Orde Wingate and his famed long-range penetration unit, the "Chindits," cut through the Burmese jungle, skirmishing with Japanese troops, destroying bridges, and cutting rail lines. Their advance and success shocked the Japanese, who had been conquering East Asia at an unstoppable pace. The Chindits' success, however, came at a price: they lost one-third of their three thousand men during the two-month-long mission. But though the Chindits were ultimately pushed back to India, their mission set the foundation for long-range penetration troops into Japanese-controlled territory. Months later, in August 1943, a call went out for three thousand American troops to volunteer for a hazardous secret mission in the Burmese jungle. Casualties were expected to be 85 percent. Despite these unfavorable odds, the required number of troops was raised, comprising men with varied military and personal backgrounds, such as Sioux and Japanese-Americans who later formed the core of the unit's elite intelligence and reconnaissance platoons. Code-named "Unit Galahad" but lacking an official designation, they were christened the "Dead End Kids" by an embedded newspaper correspondent. After Col. Charles Hunter, the unit's commander during training, was reassigned to second-in-command and replaced by Brig. Gen. Frank Merrill, other members of the press coined the more popular nickname for the unit that eventually stuck: Merrill's Marauders. After training for months in India, the Marauders made their way into Burma in February 1944 and cut their way over mountain passes and through thick jungle growth, fighting off malaria and dysentery. The Marauders continued their trek through the Burmese jungle and engaged in several skirmishes with Japanese troops on their way to their ultimate goal: capturing the vital Japanese-controlled airstrip at Myitkyina, which linked northern Burma to the rest of the country. Once the airfield was captured through a series of brilliant outflanking movements assisted by Chinese units and Kachin hill tribes, the Marauders dug in to defend it until troops from the First Chinese Army arrived. Only two hundred of the original three thousand Marauders remained in fighting condition when the support came. General Joseph Stilwell reorganized the group with reinforcements and then focused on taking the town of Myitkyina, which the Allies finally wrestled from the Japanese in August 1943. For their bravery in the harshest fighting conditions, the group received a Presidential Unit Citation, six Distinguished Service Crosses, four Legions of Merit, and forty-four Silver Stars. "Merrill's Marauders" is the story of this highly decorated unit, one of the toughest special forces units of World War II. Author bio: Award-winning historian Gavin Mortimer is one of the world's foremost experts on World War II special forces. His history of the wartime Special Air Service was praised by the BBC as "a highly authoritative but also absorbing account," and it is currently under option from GK-TV in Hollywood. He has also written "The Daring Dozen: Special Forces Legends of World War II," a study of twelve of the most influential wartime special forces soldiers from the United States, Britain, and Germany. He contributes regularly to "World War II" magazine, "MHQ" ("Military History Quarterly)," and other historical publications on both sides of the Atlantic.
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Wildlife Rangers Handbook

Author: G. D. Springthorpe,N. G. Myhill,Great Britain. Forestry Commission

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Forest rangers

Page: 130

View: 1223

As the nation's largest landowner, the Forestry Commission has given an increasingly good example of proper conservation practice. This handbook, first published eight years ago, has now been reprinted with amendments. It is a practical manual written for working wildlife rangers by working wildlife rangers. Subjects covered range from wildlife and conservation to sporting management, and from crop protection to the ranger and the law.
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Open Earth

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Geology

Page: N.A

View: 7536

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