Monstrous Nature

Environment and Horror on the Big Screen

Author: Robin L. Murray,Joseph K. Heumann

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803294905

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 288

View: 3120

Godzilla, a traditional natural monster and representation of cinema's subgenre of natural attack, also provides a cautionary symbol of the dangerous consequences of mistreating the natural world--monstrous nature on the attack. Horror films such as Godzilla invite an exploration of the complexities of a monstrous nature that humanity both creates and embodies. Robin L. Murray and Joseph K. Heumann demonstrate how the horror film and its offshoots can often be understood in relation to a monstrous nature that has evolved either deliberately or by accident and that generates fear in humanity as both character and audience. This connection between fear and the natural world opens up possibilities for ecocritical readings often missing from research on monstrous nature, the environment, and the horror film. Organized in relation to four recurring environmental themes in films that construct nature as a monster--anthropomorphism, human ecology, evolution, and gendered landscapes--the authors apply ecocritical perspectives to reveal the multiple ways nature is constructed as monstrous or in which the natural world itself constructs monsters. This interdisciplinary approach to film studies fuses cultural, theological, and scientific critiques to explore when and why nature becomes monstrous.
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Beyond Nature Writing

Expanding the Boundaries of Ecocriticism

Author: Karla Armbruster,Kathleen R. Wallace

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 9780813920146

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 372

View: 8696

"Beyond Nature Writing is a stimulating, challenging, lively, and informative book--an impressive gathering of essays that delineate the expanding boundaries of the emerging field of ecocriticism--that will be of great use to scholars and teachers with an interest in literature and environmental studies." --John Tallmadge, The Union Institute, author of Meeting the Tree of Life: A Teacher's Path "Many of these essays are quite lovely, and John Elder's is worth the price of the volume all by itself." --Bill McKibben, Harvard University, author of The End of Nature
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Monstrous Kinds

Body, Space, and Narrative in Renaissance Representations of Disability

Author: Elizabeth Bearden

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 0472131125

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 284

View: 5910

Monstrous Kinds is the first book to explore textual representations of disability in the global Renaissance. Elizabeth B. Bearden contends that monstrosity, as a precursor to modern concepts of disability, has much to teach about our tendency to inscribe disability with meaning. Understanding how early modern writers approached disability not only provides more accurate genealogies of disability, but also helps nuance current aesthetic and theoretical disability formulations. The book analyzes the cultural valences of early modern disability across a broad national and chronological span, attending to the specific bodily, spatial, and aesthetic systems that contributed to early modern literary representations of disability. The cross section of texts (including conduct books and treatises, travel writing and wonder books) is comparative, putting canonical European authors such as Castiglione into dialogue with transatlantic and Anglo-Ottoman literary exchange. Bearden questions grand narratives that convey a progression of disability from supernatural marvel to medical specimen, suggesting that, instead, these categories coexist and intersect.
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Frankenstein's Science

Experimentation and Discovery in Romantic Culture, 1780-1830

Author: Christa Knellwolf King,Jane R. Goodall

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 9780754654476

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 225

View: 9699

Frankenstein's Science contextualizes this widely taught novel in contemporary scientific and literary debates, providing new historical scholarship into areas of science and pseudo-science that generated fierce controversy in Mary Shelley's time: anatomy
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Maps and Monsters in Medieval England

Author: Asa Mittman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135501114

Category: History

Page: 292

View: 6824

First published in 2006. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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Starring T. Rex!

Dinosaur Mythology and Popular Culture

Author: José Luis Sanz

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 9780253215505

Category: Nature

Page: 153

View: 7680

The intersection between science, myth, and popular culture is explored in through the story of T. Rex, from the nineteenth-century discovery of his fossil remains to his glorification in popular culture. Simultaneous. (Science & Mathematics)
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Monsters in the Italian Literary Imagination

Author: Keala Jane Jewell

Publisher: Wayne State University Press

ISBN: 9780814328385

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 325

View: 8385

A culture defines monsters against what is essentially thought of as human. Creatures such as the harpy, the siren, the witch, and the half-human all threaten to destroy our sense of power and intelligence and usurp our human consciousness. In this way, monster myths actually work to define a culture's definition of what is human. In Monsters in the Italian Literary Imagination, a broad range of scholars examine the monster in Italian culture and its evolution from the medieval period to the twentieth century. Editor Keala Jewell explores how Italian culture juxtaposes the powers of the monster against the human. The essays in this volume engage a wide variety of philological, feminist, and psychoanalytical approaches and examine monstrous figures from the medieval to postmodern periods. They each share a critical interest in how monsters reflect a culture's dominant ideologies. Monsters in the Italian Literary Imagination will interest scholars and students of literary theory and criticism, gender studies, cultural studies, art, and Italian studies.
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Multitude

War and Democracy in the Age of Empire

Author: Michael Hardt,Antonio Negri

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 110101041X

Category: Political Science

Page: 448

View: 364

In their international bestseller Empire, Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri presented a grand unified vision of a world in which the old forms of imperialism are no longer effective. But what of Empire in an age of “American empire”? Has fear become our permanent condition and democracy an impossible dream? Such pessimism is profoundly mistaken, the authors argue. Empire, by interconnecting more areas of life, is actually creating the possibility for a new kind of democracy, allowing different groups to form a multitude, with the power to forge a democratic alternative to the present world order.Exhilarating in its optimism and depth of insight, Multitude consolidates Hardt and Negri’s stature as two of the most important political philosophers at work in the world today.
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Nature

Author: Sir Norman Lockyer

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Electronic journals

Page: N.A

View: 7276

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Stalin in Russian Satire, 1917–1991

Author: Karen L. Ryan

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN: 9780299234430

Category: History

Page: 241

View: 2087

During Stalin’s lifetime the crimes of his regime were literally unspeakable. More than fifty years after his death, Russia is still coming to terms with Stalinism and the people’s own role in the abuses of the era. During the decades of official silence that preceded the advent of glasnost, Russian writers raised troubling questions about guilt, responsibility, and the possibility of absolution. Through the subtle vehicle of satire, they explored the roots and legacy of Stalinism in forms ranging from humorous mockery to vitriolic diatribe. Examining works from the 1917 Revolution to the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991, Karen L. Ryan reveals how satirical treatments of Stalin often emphasize his otherness, distancing him from Russian culture. Some satirists portray Stalin as a madman. Others show him as feminized, animal-like, monstrous, or diabolical. Stalin has also appeared as the unquiet dead, a spirit that keeps returning to haunt the collective memory of the nation. While many writers seem anxious to exorcise Stalin from the body politic, for others he illuminates the self in disturbing ways. To what degree Stalin was and is “in us” is a central question of all these works. Although less visible than public trials, policy shifts, or statements of apology, Russian satire has subtly yet insistently participated in the protracted process of de-Stalinization.
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Rum, Sodomy, and the Lash

Piracy, Sexuality, and Masculine Identity

Author: Hans Turley

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814782231

Category: History

Page: 199

View: 3948

2007 Choice Outstanding Academic Title Although the 1969 Stonewall riots in New York City symbolically mark the start of the gay rights movement, individuals came together long before the modern era to express their same-sex romantic and sexual attraction toward one another, and in a myriad of ways. Some reflected on their desires in quiet solitude, while others endured verbal, physical, and legal harassment for publicly expressing homosexual interest through words or actions. Long Before Stonewall seeks to uncover the many iterations of same-sex desire in colonial America and the early Republic, as well as to expand the scope of how we define and recognize homosocial behavior. Thomas A. Foster has assembled a pathbreaking, interdisciplinary collection of original and classic essays that explore topics ranging from homoerotic imagery of black men to prison reform to the development of sexual orientations. This collection spans a regional and temporal breadth that stretches from the colonial Southwest to Quaker communities in New England. It also includes a challenge to commonly accepted understandings of the Native American berdache. Throughout, connections of race, class, status, and gender are emphasized, exposing the deep foundations on which modern sexual political movements and identities are built.
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Hosting the Monster

Author: Holly Lynn Baumgartner,Roger Davis

Publisher: Rodopi

ISBN: 9042024860

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 258

View: 5684

Hosting the Monster responds to the call of the monstrous with, not rejection, but invitation. Positing the monster as that which defies classification, the essays in this collection are an ongoing engagement with that which lies outside of established boundaries. With chapters ranging from the monstrous mother or the deformed child to subjectivity in transition, this volume is not only of interest to film and gender scholars and literary and cultural theorists but also students of popular culture or horror. Its wide appeal stems from its invitation both to entertain the monster and to widen the call to and the listening for the monsters that have not yet, and perhaps must not yet, come calling back. This sense of hospitality and non-hostility is one guiding principle of this collection, suggesting that the ability to survey and research the otherwise may reveal more about the subjectivity of the self through the wisdom of the other, however monstrous the manifestation. Holly Lynn Baumgartner is an associate professor of Humanities and English at Mercy College of Northwest Ohio. Her articles have appeared in Reflections, Rhizomes, American Book Review and other journals. Roger Davis is an instructor of English at MacEwan College in Edmonton, Canada. He is co-author of Essay Writing for Canadian Students and his literary interests include poetry, poetics and popular culture. Contents Preface Holly Lynn BAUMGARTNER and Roger DAVIS: Hosting the Monster: Introduction Duane W. KIGHT: ¿I Live in the Weak and the Wounded¿: The Monster of Brad Anderson¿s Session 9 Amaya MURUZÁBAL MURUZÁBAL: The Monster as a Victim of War: The Returning Veteran in The Best Years of Our Lives Lucy FIFE: Human Monstrosity: Rape, Ambiguity and Performance in Rosemary¿s Baby Inderjit GREWAL: The Monstrous and Maternal in Toni Morrison¿s Beloved Hannah PRIEST: The Witch and the Werewolf: Rebirth and Subjectivity in Medieval Verse Holly Lynn BAUMGARTNER: It¿s Never the Bass: Opera¿s True Transgressors Sing Soprano Katherine ANGELL: Joseph Merrick and the Concept of Monstrosity in Nineteenth Century Medical Thought Jessica WEBB: Herculine Barbin: Human Error, Criminality and the Case of the Monstrous Hermaphrodite Cecilia A. FEILLA: Literary Monsters: Gender, Genius, and Writing in Denis Diderot¿s `On Women¿ and Mary Shelley¿s Frankenstein Sorcha NÍ FHLAINN: Sweet, Bloody Vengeance: Class, Social Stigma and Servitude in the Slasher Genre. David M. KINGSLEY: It Came from Four-Colour Fiction: The Effect of Cold War Comic Books on the Fiction of Stephen King Liesbet DEPAUW: The Monsters that Failed to Scare: The Atypical Reception of the 1930s Horror Films in Belgium Roger DAVIS: ¿a white illusion of a man¿: Snowman, Survival and Speculation in Margaret Atwood¿s Oryx and Crake Notes on Contributors
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The Monster That Is History

History, Violence, and Fictional Writing in Twentieth-Century China

Author: David Der-Wei Wang

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520937246

Category: History

Page: 409

View: 6396

In ancient China a monster called Taowu was known for both its vicious nature and its power to see the past and the future. Over the centuries Taowu underwent many incarnations until it became identifiable with history itself. Since the seventeenth century, fictive accounts of history have accommodated themselves to the monstrous nature of Taowu. Moving effortlessly across the entire twentieth-century literary landscape, David Der-wei Wang delineates the many meanings of Chinese violence and its literary manifestations. Taking into account the campaigns of violence and brutality that have rocked generations of Chinese—often in the name of enlightenment, rationality, and utopian plenitude—this book places its arguments along two related axes: history and representation, modernity and monstrosity. Wang considers modern Chinese history as a complex of geopolitical, ethnic, gendered, and personal articulations of bygone and ongoing events. His discussion ranges from the politics of decapitation to the poetics of suicide, and from the typology of hunger and starvation to the technology of crime and punishment.
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Art Beyond Representation

The Performative Power of the Image

Author: Barbara Bolt

Publisher: I.B.Tauris

ISBN: 0857731793

Category: Art

Page: 224

View: 7157

Refuting the assumption that art is a representational practice, Bolt’s striking argument engages with the work of Heidegger, Deleuze and Guattari, C.S.Peirce and Judith Butler to argue for a performative relationship between art and artist. Drawing on themes as diverse as the work of Cézanne and of Francis Bacon, the transubstantiation of the Catholic sacrament and Wilde’s novel The Picture of Dorian Gray, she challenges the metaphor of light as enlightenment, reconceiving this ‘revealing’ light as the blinding ‘glare’ of the Australian sun, and suggests that too much ‘light’ may in fact reveal nothing. This stimulating book questions many of the fundamental assumptions ingrained in us about the nature of art.
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Tours of the Black Clock

A Novel

Author: Steve Erickson

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 1480409944

Category: Fiction

Page: 320

View: 6764

The course of a century is rewritten in this fabulously warped odyssey, named a best book of the year by the New York Times Tours of the Black Clock is a wild dream of the twentieth century as told by the ghost of Banning Jainlight. After a disturbing family secret is unearthed, Jainlight throws his father out of a window and burns down the Pennsylvania ranch where he grew up. He escapes to Vienna where he is commissioned to write pornography for a single customer identified as “Client X,” which alters the trajectory of World War II. Eventually Jainlight is accompanied by an aged and senile Adolf Hitler back to America, where both men pursue the same lover. Tours of the Black Clock is a story in which history and the laws of space and time are unforgettably transformed.
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Mary Shelley: 'Frankenstein'

Author: Essaka Joshua

Publisher: Humanities-Ebooks

ISBN: N.A

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 77

View: 565

Places Mary Shelley’s revolutionary novel in its political, philosophical and literary context. Frankenstein is one of the most popular novels from the Romantic period. This accessible study, written by a specialist in Romantic literature, examines Frankenstein within its literary and philosophical contexts. It looks closely at the range of genres from which the novel emerged, offering textual analysis of key passages from this and related texts. There is a summary of criticism on the novel, a discussion of the historical background, and a wide-ranging exploration of the literary sources. The study focuses on the moral questions that arise from the novel, investigating the range of questions that Shelley raises and offering an analysis of her answers.
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Homophobia

A History

Author: Byrne Fone

Publisher: Metropolitan Books

ISBN: 1466817070

Category: Social Science

Page: 480

View: 602

The first comprehensive history of homophobia-from ancient Athens to the halls of Congress-this bold, original work is certain to become a classic. It is the last acceptable prejudice. In an age when racial and ethnic name-calling are viewed with distaste, and physical epithets are frowned upon, hatred of homosexuals remains rife. Now, in a tour de force of historical and literary research, Byrne Fone chronicles the evolution of homophobia through the centuries. Delving into literary sources as diverse as Greek philosophy, the Bible, Elizabethan poetry, and the Victorian novel, as well as historical texts and propaganda from the French Revolution to the Moral Majority, Fone finds that same-sex desire has always been the object of legal, social, and religious persecution. Fone shows how the biblical story of Sodom became the primary source for later prohibitions against homosexuality. He charts the subtle shifts in public attitudes and law, from Anglo-Saxon edicts that imposed death by burning upon "confess'd sodomytes," to Victorian decrees that punished sodomy with "forfeiture of all rights, including procreation" (i.e., castration). Sifting the evidence of our own times, including Reader's Digest articles and TV talk-show transcripts, Fone demonstrates that homophobia remains one of the central tenets of law, science, faith, and literature, and defines the very essence of what it means to be male or female. Written by an acclaimed expert in gay and lesbian history, Homophobia is the best sort of history: lively, accessible, and enlightening.
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