Migration and Refugee Policies in Germany

New European Limits of Control?

Author: Andreas Ette

Publisher: Verlag Barbara Budrich

ISBN: 3847410776

Category: Social Science

Page: 314

View: 9024

International migration is one of the most controversial political topics today which demands innovative approaches of global and regional governance. The book provides a fresh theoretical framework to understand European responses to the international migration of people and explains the dynamics of Germany’s migration and refugee policy during the last two decades. Against traditional theories and their inherent focus on the national political sphere, the book highlights supranational and multi-level political processes as increasingly important factors to account for national policy changes. Confronted with the most recent developments of international migration, the study offers students and practitioners the necessary background to participate in today’s debates.
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Immigration Controls

The Search for Workable Policies in Germany and the United States

Author: Kay Hailbronner,David A. Martin,Hiroshi Motomura

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9781571810908

Category: Emigration and immigration law

Page: 230

View: 6046

Some of the most pressing questions in immigration law and policy today concern the problem of immigration controls. How are immigration laws administered, and how are they enforced against those who enter and remain in a receiving country without legal permission? Comparing the United States and Germany, two of the four extended essays in this volume concern enforcement; the other two address techniques for managing high-volume asylum systems in both countries.
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Immigration Policy In The Federal Republic Of Germany

Negotiating Membership and Remaking the Nation

Author: Douglas B. Klusmeyer,Demetrios G. Papademetriou

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 0857456261

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 8441

German migration policy now stands at a major crossroad, caught between a fifty-year history of missed opportunities and serious new challenges. Focusing on these new challenges that German policy makers face, the authors, both internationally recognized in this field, use historical argument, theoretical analysis, and empirical evaluation to advance a more nuanced understanding of recent initiatives and the implications of these initiatives. Their approach combines both synthesis and original research in a presentation that is not only accessible to the general educated reader but also addresses the concerns of academic scholars and policy analysts. This important volume offers a comprehensive and critical examination of the history of German migration law and policy from the Federal Republic’s inception in 1949 to the present.
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Migrants, Refugees, and Foreign Policy

U. S. and German Policies Toward Countries of Origin

Author: Rainer Munz,Myron Weiner

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9781571810885

Category: Political Science

Page: 368

View: 2408

Foreign policies have always played an important role in the movements of migrants. A number of essays in this volume show how the foreign policies of the United States and Germany have directly or inadvertently contributed to the influx from the former Yugoslavia, Mexico, the Caribbean, and the former Soviet Union. Now being faced with growing resistance to admit foreigners into their countries, both governments have once again been using foreign-policy instruments in an effort to change the conditions in the refugees' countries of origin which forced people to leave. This volume addresses questions such as which policies can influence governments to improve their human rights, protect minorities, end internal strife, reduce the level of violence, or improve economic conditions so that large numbers of people need not leave their homes.
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International Migration and Refugee Law. Does Germany's Migration Policy Toward Syrian Refugees Comply?

Author: Jasmin Lilian Diab

Publisher: Anchor Academic Publishing

ISBN: 3960676514

Category: Law

Page: 135

View: 564

Germany will spend around $6.6 billion to cope with an estimated 800,000 refugees expected to have entered the country in the year 2016; this reality indeed extending further into 2017. Despite this overwhelming number of people entering the country, Chancellor Angela Merkel stated that there is “no legal limit to the number of asylum seekers Germany will take in in the coming years.” The announcement by Merkel's coalition government arrived following Germany and Austria opening their borders to the large numbers of refugees making their way north and west from the Middle East, Africa and elsewhere. In particular, this statement came after the Syrian refugee crisis created the biggest refugee crisis the world has seen since the Second World War. Germany is seen as the immigration hub of Europe. It also happens to be the second most popular destination for immigrants after the United States of America. Germany is also the country in Europe with the highest numbers of foreign nationals to date. Germany established a new immigration law in 2005 was born out of a realization that it was coming to terms with a demographic crisis stemming from an ageing population and further complimented by a sharp decline national birth rates. In foresight, and within this unfortunate context, migration was seen by much of the German political class as an economic necessity, and the answer to the German economic and demographic time bomb. Between the years 2009 and 2014, annual net migration in Germany rose from 100,000 to 580,000 individuals. Moreover, the inflow of foreign nationals increased from 266,000 to 790,000 individuals. As of January 2015, approximately 10% of residents in Germany were foreign nationals, with around 12% born outside the country. Naturally, these figures have all risen significantly following Merkel’s decision to allow what has reached one million refugees and migrants into Germany across 2016 and moving into 2017. Moving from this reality, the research will focus on the importance of the compliance of Germany’s migration policy with International Refugee and Migration Law, as it is crucial for the country’s survivability and move forward throughout this phase of its history. The importance of the research lies in whether or not Germany’s migration policy towards the Syrian Refugees in particular complies with its duties toward international law embodied in the treaties and conventions it has committed to.
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Migration, Memory, and Diversity

Germany from 1945 to the Present

Author: Cornelia Wilhelm

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 1785333283

Category: Social Science

Page: 366

View: 1965

Within Germany, policies and cultural attitudes toward migrants have been profoundly shaped by the difficult legacies of the Second World War and its aftermath. This wide-ranging volume explores the complex history of migration and diversity in Germany from 1945 to today, showing how conceptions of "otherness" developed while memories of the Nazi era were still fresh, and identifying the continuities and transformations they exhibited through the Cold War and reunification. It provides invaluable context for understanding contemporary Germany's unique role within regional politics at a time when an unprecedented influx of immigrants and refugees present the European community with a significant challenge.
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Refugees from Nazi Germany and the Liberal European States

Author: Frank Caestecker,Bob Moore

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9781845455873

Category: History

Page: 346

View: 858

"The exodus of refugees from Nazi Germany in the 1930s has received far more attention from historians, social scientists, and demographers than many other migrations and persecutions in Europe. However, as a result of the overwhelming attention that has been given to the Holocaust within the historiography of Europe and the Second World War, the issues surrounding the flight of people from Nazi Germany prior to 1939 have been seen as Vorgeschichte (pre-history) ... Based on a comparative analysis of national case studies, this volume deals with the challenges that the pre-1939 movement of refugees from Germany and Austria posed to the immigration controls in the countries of interwar Europe"--Publisher's description.
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Paths to Inclusion

The Integration of Migrants in the United States and Germany

Author: Peter H. Schuck,Rainer Münz

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9781571810922

Category: Social Science

Page: 306

View: 6508

When discussing wages, historians have traditionally concentrated on the level of wages, much less on how people were paid for their work. Important aspects were thus ignored such as how frequently were wages actually paid, how much of the wage was paid in non-monetary form - whether as traditional perquisites or community relief - especially when there was often insufficient coinage available to pay wages. Covering a wide geographical area, ranging from Spain to Finland, and time span, ranging from the sixteenth century to the 1930s, this volume offers fresh perspectives on key areas in social and economic history such as the relationship between customs, moral economy, wages and the market, changing pay and wage forms and the relationship between age, gender and wages.
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Immigration Policy In The Federal Republic Of Germany

Negotiating Membership and Remaking the Nation

Author: Douglas B. Klusmeyer,Demetrios G. Papademetriou

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 0857456261

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 1749

German migration policy now stands at a major crossroad, caught between a fifty-year history of missed opportunities and serious new challenges. Focusing on these new challenges that German policy makers face, the authors, both internationally recognized in this field, use historical argument, theoretical analysis, and empirical evaluation to advance a more nuanced understanding of recent initiatives and the implications of these initiatives. Their approach combines both synthesis and original research in a presentation that is not only accessible to the general educated reader but also addresses the concerns of academic scholars and policy analysts. This important volume offers a comprehensive and critical examination of the history of German migration law and policy from the Federal Republic’s inception in 1949 to the present.
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Refugees, Citizenship and Social Policy in Europe

Author: A. Bloch,C. Levy

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230371248

Category: Social Science

Page: 242

View: 2459

Recently, global and European migration in the post-Cold War world have received much attention. This edited collection is a comprehensive, up-to-date account of the social policies of European welfare states towards refugees and asylum seekers. It also examines the contested boundaries between refugees and asylum seekers and citizenship within European nation states and the European Union.
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Immigration Admissions

The Search for Workable Policies in Germany and the United States

Author: Kay Hailbronner

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9781571814081

Category: Social Science

Page: 296

View: 7347

There is general agreement today that traditional approaches to immigration admissions in the major receiving countries of the West have serious shortcomings either in concept or implementation, or at times in both. These essays, all written by leading immigration experts, consider the philosophical and moral constraints on immigration law and policy, the basic elements of a comprehensive migration policy, and specific policy areas, including family reunification and asylum. Taken together, these perspectives represent a fresh, comparative look at some of the most urgent issues in this pivotal area of law and policy.
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Migration Past, Migration Future

Germany and the United States

Author: Klaus J. Bade

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9781571814074

Category: Political Science

Page: 176

View: 7538

The United States is an immigrant country. Germany is not. This volume shatters this widely held myth and reveals the remarkable similarities (as well as the differences) between the two countries. Essays by leading German and American historians and demographers describe how these two countries have become to have the largest number of immigrants among advanced industrial countries, how their conceptions of citizenship and nationality differ, and how their ethnic compositions are likely to be transformed in the next century as a consequence ofmigration, fertility trends, citizenship and naturalization laws, and public attitudes.
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Go, Went, Gone

Author: Jenny Erpenbeck

Publisher: New Directions Publishing

ISBN: 081122595X

Category: Fiction

Page: 320

View: 5604

An unforgettable German bestseller about the European refugee crisis: “Erpenbeck will get under your skin” (Washington Post Book World) Go, Went, Gone is the masterful new novel by the acclaimed German writer Jenny Erpenbeck, “one of the most significant German-language novelists of her generation” (The Millions). The novel tells the tale of Richard, a retired classics professor who lives in Berlin. His wife has died, and he lives a routine existence until one day he spies some African refugees staging a hunger strike in Alexanderplatz. Curiosity turns to compassion and an inner transformation, as he visits their shelter, interviews them, and becomes embroiled in their harrowing fates. Go, Went, Gone is a scathing indictment of Western policy toward the European refugee crisis, but also a touching portrait of a man who finds he has more in common with the Africans than he realizes. Exquisitely translated by Susan Bernofsky, Go, Went, Gone addresses one of the most pivotal issues of our time, facing it head-on in a voice that is both nostalgic and frightening.
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Alien Policy in Belgium, 1840-1940

The Creation of Guest Workers, Refugees and Illegal Aliens

Author: Frank Caestecker

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9781571819864

Category: History

Page: 330

View: 4059

Belgium has a unique place in the history of migration in that it was the first among industrialized nations in Continental Europe to develop into an immigrant society. In the nineteenth century Italians, Jews, Poles, Czechs, and North Africans settled in Belgium to work in industry and commerce. They were followed by Russians in the 1920s and Germans in the 1930s who were seeking a safe haven from persecution by totalitarian regimes. In the nineteenth century immigrants were to a larger extent integrated into Belgian society: they were denied political rights but participated on equal terms with Belgians in social life. This changed radically in the twentieth century; by 1940 the rights of aliens were severely curtailed, while those of Belgian citizens, in particular in the social domain, were extended. While the state evolved into a "welfare state" for its citizens it became more of a police state for immigrants. The state only tolerated immigrants who were prepared to carry out those jobs that were shunned by the Belgians. Under the pressure of public opinion, an exception was made in the cases of thousands of Jewish refugees that had fled from Nazi Germany. However, other immigrants were subjected to harsh regulations and in fact became the outcasts of twentieth-century Belgian liberal society. This remarkable study examines in depth and over a long time span how (anti-) alien policies were transformed, resulting in an illiberal exclusion of foreigners at the same time as democratization and the welfare state expanded. In this respect Belgium is certainly not unique but offers an interesting case study of developments that are characteristic for Europe as a whole. Frank Caesteckeris senior researcher at the University of Ghent, Department of Modern and Contemporary History.
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Arrival City

How the Largest Migration in History Is Reshaping Our World

Author: Doug Saunders

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307379655

Category: Social Science

Page: 384

View: 7842

Look around: the largest migration in human history is under way. For the first time ever, more people are living in cities than in rural areas. Between 2007 and 2050, the world’s cities will have absorbed 3.1 billion people. Urbanization is the mass movement that will change our world during the twenty-first century, and the “arrival city” is where it is taking place. The arrival city exists on the outskirts of the metropolis, in the slums, or in the suburbs; the American version is New York’s Lower East Side of a century ago or today’s Herndon County, Virginia. These are the places where newcomers try to establish new lives and to integrate themselves socially and economically. Their goal is to build communities, to save and invest, and, hopefully, move out, making room for the next wave of migrants. For some, success is years away; for others, it will never come at all. As vibrant places of exchange, arrival cities have long been indicators of social health. Whether it’s Paris in 1789 or Tehran in 1978, whenever migrant populations are systematically ignored, we should expect violence and extremism. But, as the award-winning journalist Doug Saunders demonstrates, when we make proper investments in our arrival cities—through transportation, education, security, and citizenship—a prosperous middle class develops. Saunders takes us on a tour of these vital centers, from Maryland to Shenzhen, from the favelas of Rio to the shantytowns of Mumbai, from Los Angeles to Nairobi. He uncovers the stories—both inspiring and heartbreaking—of the people who live there, and he shows us how the life or death of our arrival cities will determine the shape of our future. From the Hardcover edition.
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The Way of the Strangers

Encounters with the Islamic State

Author: Graeme Wood

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 0812988752

Category: History

Page: 317

View: 4486

"The Way of the Strangers is an intimate journey into the minds of the Islamic State's true believers. From the streets of Cairo to the mosques of London, Wood interviews supporters, recruiters, and sympathizers of the group...Wood speaks with non-Islamic State Muslim scholars and jihadists, and explores the group's idiosyncratic, coherent approach to Islam...Through character study and analysis, Wood provides a clear-eyed look at a movement that has inspired so many people to abandon or uproot their families.
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Migration, Mobilities and the Arab Spring

Spaces of Refugee Flight in the Eastern Mediterranean

Author: Natalia Ribas-Mateos

Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing

ISBN: 1785361953

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 1941

Confronting questions of globalization, mobilities and space in the Mediterranean, and more specifically in the eastern Mediterranean, this book introduces a new type of complexity and ambiguity to the study of the global. In this theoretical frame an increasingly urban articulation of global logics and struggles, and an escalating use of urban space to make political claims, not only by citizens but also by foreigners, can be found. By emphasizing the interplay between global, regional and local phenomena, the book examines new forms and conditions, such as the transformation of borders, the reconfiguration of transnational communities, the agency of transnational families, new mobilities and diasporas, and transnational networks of humanitarian response.
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The Politics of Exclusion

Institutions and Immigration Policy in Contemporary Germany

Author: Simon Green

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719065880

Category: Political Science

Page: 162

View: 7061

"Using an innovative analytical perspective, this book arrives at a new explanation for the persistence until recently of this apparent paradox. It uses models of policy-making in Germany to argue that the political system, in which power is widely dispersed between institutions, provides significant insights into why policy has only evolved gradually. In consequence, and despite considerable political pressure for change, Germany's policy structures have so far failed to adequately address the reality of immigration in its cities.
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