Making Indian Law

The Hualapai Land Case and the Birth of Ethnohistory

Author: Christian W. McMillen

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300143294

Category: History

Page: 284

View: 8717

In 1941, after decades of struggling to hold on to the remainder of their aboriginal home, the Hualapai Indians finally took their case to the Supreme Court?and won. The Hualapai case was the culminating event in a legal and intellectual revolution that transformed Indian law and ushered in a new way of writing Indian history that provided legal grounds for native land claims. But Making Indian Law is about more than a legal decision. It's the story of Hualapai activists, and eventually sympathetic lawyers, who challenged both the Santa Fe Railroad and the U.S. government to a courtroom showdown over the meaning of Indian property rights?and the Indian past. At the heart of the Hualapai campaign to save the reservation was documenting the history of Hualapai land use. Making Indian Law showcases the central role that the Hualapai and their lawyers played in formulating new understandings of native people, their property, and their past. To this day, the impact of the Hualapai decision is felt wherever and whenever indigenous land claims are litigated throughout the world.
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We are an Indian Nation

A History of the Hualapai People

Author: Jeffrey P. Shepherd

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 9780816528288

Category: History

Page: 282

View: 9188

Though not as well known as the U.S. military campaigns against the Apache, the ethnic warfare conducted against indigenous people of the Colorado River basin was equally devastating. In less than twenty-five years after first encountering Anglos, the Hualapais had lost more than half their population and nearly all their land and found themselves consigned to a reservation. This book focuses on the historical construction of the Hualapai Nation in the face of modern American colonialism. Drawing on archival research, interviews, and participant observation, Jeffrey Shepherd describes how thirteen bands of extended families known as The Pai confronted American colonialism and in the process recast themselves as a modern Indigenous nation. Shepherd shows that Hualapai nation-building was a complex process shaped by band identities, competing visions of the past, creative reactions to modernity, and resistance to state power. He analyzes how the Hualapais transformed an externally imposed tribal identity through nationalist discourses of protecting aboriginal territory; and he examines how that discourse strengthened the HualapaisÕ claim to land and water while simultaneously reifying a politicized version of their own history. Along the way, he sheds new light on familiar topicsÑIndianÐwhite conflict, the creation of tribal government, wage labor, federal policy, and Native activismÑby applying theories of race, space, historical memory, and decolonization. Drawing on recent work in American Indian history and Native American studies, Shepherd shows how the Hualapai have strived to reclaim a distinct identity and culture in the face of ongoing colonialism. We Are an Indian Nation is grounded in Hualapai voices and agendas while simultaneously situating their history in the larger tapestry of Native peoplesÕ confrontations with colonialism and modernity.
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Program of the ... Annual Meeting

Author: American Historical Association,History of Science Society. Meeting

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Medical

Page: N.A

View: 3913

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Shadow Tribe

The Making of Columbia River Indian Identity

Author: Andrew H. Fisher

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295990201

Category: History

Page: 337

View: 8883

Shadow Tribe offers the first in-depth history of the Pacific Northwest's Columbia River Indians - the defiant River People whose ancestors refused to settle on the reservations established for them in central Oregon and Washington. Largely overlooked, their story illuminates the persistence of off-reservation Native communities and the fluidity of their identities over time.
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Northeast Indians

Author: Craig A. Doherty,Katherine M. Doherty

Publisher: Infobase Publishing

ISBN: 0816059683

Category: History

Page: 180

View: 2110

Details the history and culture of Native Americans of the Northeast, discussing their family life, houses, clothes, tools, transportation, daily life, how they live today, and important people and events.
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Indigenous Intellectuals

Author: Kiara M. Vigil

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107070813

Category: History

Page: 374

View: 6359

Examines the literary output of four influential American Indian intellectuals who challenged conceptions of identity at the turn of the twentieth century.
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Dispossessing the Wilderness

Indian Removal and the Making of the National Parks

Author: Mark David Spence

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780195142433

Category: History

Page: 190

View: 5618

National parks like Yellowstone, Yosemite, and Glacier preserve some of this country's most cherished wilderness landscapes. While visions of pristine, uninhabited nature led to the creation of these parks, they also inspired policies of Indian removal. By contrasting the native histories of these places with the links between Indian policy developments and preservationist efforts, this work examines the complex origins of the national parks and the troubling consequences of the American wilderness ideal. The first study to place national park history within the context of the early reservation era, it details the ways that national parks developed into one of the most important arenas of contention between native peoples and non-Indians in the twentieth century.
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The Wind Won't Know Me

A History of the Navajo-Hopi Land Dispute

Author: Emily Benedek

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780806131252

Category: History

Page: 443

View: 3441

An account of the battle between the Navahos and Hopis over millions of acres of disputed Arizona land discusses the various competing interests involved
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Are We Not Foreigners Here?

Indigenous Nationalism in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands

Author: Jeffrey M. Schulze

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781469637105

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 8828

Since its inception, the U.S.-Mexico border has invited the creation of cultural, economic, and political networks that often function in defiance of surrounding nation-states. It has also produced individual and group identities that are as subversive as they are dynamic. In Are We Not Foreigners Here?, Jeffrey M. Schulze explores how the U.S.-Mexico border shaped the concepts of nationhood and survival strategies of three Indigenous tribes who live in this borderland: the Yaqui, Kickapoo, and Tohono O'odham. These tribes have historically fought against nation-state interference, employing strategies that draw on their transnational orientation to survive and thrive. Schulze details the complexities of the tribes' claims to nationhood in the context of the border from the nineteenth century to the present. He shows that in spreading themselves across two powerful, omnipresent nation-states, these tribes managed to maintain separation from currents of federal Indian policy in both countries; at the same time, it could also leave them culturally and politically vulnerable, especially as surrounding powers stepped up their efforts to control transborder traffic. Schulze underlines these tribes' efforts to reconcile their commitment to preserving their identities, asserting their nationhood, and creating transnational links of resistance with an increasingly formidable international boundary.
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Encyclopedia of Immigration and Migration in the American West

Author: Gordon Morris Bakken,Alexandra Kindell

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 1412905508

Category: History

Page: 848

View: 3492

The Encyclopedia of Immigration and Migration in the American West provides much more than ethnic groups crossing the plains, landing at ports, or crossing borders; this two-volume work makes the history of the American West an important part of the American experience. Through sweeping entries, focused biographies, community histories, economic enterprise analysis, and demographic studies, this Encyclopedia presents the tapestry of the West and its population during various periods of migration. The two volumes examine the settling of the West and include coverage of movements of American Indians, African Americans, and the often-forgotten role of women in the West's development.
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Culture builds communities

a guide to partnership building and putting culture to work on social issues

Author: Kathy Booth,Partners for Livable Communities

Publisher: Partners for Livable Places

ISBN: N.A

Category: Art

Page: 86

View: 4620

This guide arose from a forum held in 1994 at the Smithsonian Institution. It is a resource for civic leaders and cultural institutions to utilize in their ever more common partnerships. Synopses of successful programs nationwide are provided, thereby laying the groundwork for your group, institution, city, or school to implement community-based partnerships. Contains an extensive resource list.
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I Am the Grand Canyon

The Story of the Havasupai People

Author: Stephen Hirst

Publisher: Grand Canyon Association

ISBN: 9780938216865

Category: History

Page: 276

View: 1087

I Am the Grand Canyon is the story of the Havasupai people. From their origins among the first group of Indians to arrive in North America some 20,000 years ago to their epic struggle to regain traditional lands taken from them in the nineteenth century, the Havasupai have a long and colorful history. The story of this tiny tribe once confined to a toosmall reservation depicts a people with deep cultural ties to the land, both on their former reservation below the rim of the Grand Canyon and on the surrounding plateaus. In the spring of 1971, the federal government proposed incorporating still more Havasupai land into Grand Canyon National Park. At hearings that spring, Havasupai Tribal Chairman Lee Marshall rose to speak. “I heard all you people talking about the Grand Canyon,” he said. “Well, you’re looking at it. I am the Grand Canyon!” Marshall made it clear that Havasu Canyon and the surrounding plateau were critical to the survival of his peop≤ his speech laid the foundation for the return of thousands of acres of Havasupai land in 1975. I Am the Grand Canyon is the story of a heroic people who refused to back down when facing overwhelming odds. They won, and today the Havasupai way of life quietly continues in the Grand Canyon and on the surrounding plateaus.
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The Bourgeois Frontier

French Towns, French Traders, and American Expansion

Author: Jay Gitlin

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780300168037

Category: History

Page: 269

View: 7518

Histories tend to emphasize conquest by Anglo-Americans as the driving force behind the development of the American West. In this fresh interpretation, Jay Gitlin argues that the activities of the French are crucial to understanding the phenomenon of westward expansion. The Seven Years War brought an end to the French colonial enterprise in North America, but the French in towns such as New Orleans, St. Louis, and Detroit survived the transition to American rule. French traders from Mid-America such as the Chouteaus and Robidouxs of St. Louis then became agents of change in the West, perfecting a strategy of “middle grounding” by pursuing alliances within Indian and Mexican communities in advance of American settlement and re-investing fur trade profits in land, town sites, banks, and transportation. The Bourgeois Frontier provides the missing French connection between the urban Midwest and western expansion.
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Tribal Names of the Americas

Spelling Variants and Alternative Forms, Cross-Referenced

Author: Patricia Roberts Clark

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786451696

Category: History

Page: 329

View: 6325

Scholars have long worked to identify the names of tribes and other groupings in the Americas, a task made difficult by the sheer number of indigenous groups and the many names that have been passed down only through oral tradition. This book is a compendium of tribal names in all their variants—from North, Central and South America—collected from printed sources. Because most of these original sources reproduced words that had been encountered only orally, there is a great deal of variation. Organized alphabetically, this book collates these variations, traces them to the spellings and forms that have become standardized, and supplies see and see also references. Each main entry includes tribal name, the “parent group” or ancestral tribe, original source for the tribal name, and approximate location of the name in the original source material.
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Cases and Materials on Land Use

Author: David Callies,Robert Freilich,Shelley Saxer

Publisher: West Academic Publishing

ISBN: 9781634596879

Category:

Page: 1230

View: 5263

The 7th edition is an update with significant new cases, notes and commentary in all subjects. It also includes an expanded introduction to new areas of land use regulation. New topics include form-based zoning, transit-oriented development, public-private partnerships, and community benefit agreements. Chapters on eminent domain, land development conditions, zoning (especially variances), federal lands, global warming, greenhouse gas emissions, renewable solar and wind energy, rainwater capture and conservation, green development standards, ripeness, finality and exhaustion of remedies, standing, statutes of limitations, and judicial review have all been updated.
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American Settler Colonialism

A History

Author: W. Hixson

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 9781137374240

Category: History

Page: 253

View: 4863

Over the course of three centuries, American settlers helped to create the richest, most powerful nation in human history, even as they killed and displaced millions. This groundbreaking work shows that American history is defined by settler colonialism, providing a compelling framework through which to understand its rise to global dominance.
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Changes in the Land

Indians, Colonists, and the Ecology of New England

Author: William Cronon

Publisher: Hill and Wang

ISBN: 142992828X

Category: Nature

Page: 288

View: 9201

Winner of the Francis Parkman Prize Changes in the Land offers an original and persuasive interpretation of the changing circumstances in New England's plant and animal communities that occurred with the shift from Indian to European dominance. With the tools of both historian and ecologist, Cronon constructs an interdisciplinary analysis of how the land and the people influenced one another, and how that complex web of relationships shaped New England's communities.
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Crimes Against Nature

Squatters, Poachers, Thieves, and the Hidden History of American Conservation

Author: Karl Jacoby

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520239098

Category: History

Page: 305

View: 6878

"This insightful and lucid book combines social with environmental history, enriching both. . . . Timely, eloquent, and provocative, Crimes against Nature illuminates contemporary struggles, especially in the West, over our environment."--Alan Taylor, author of William Cooper's Town "A compelling new interpretation of early conservation history in the United States. . . . Powerfully argued and beautifully written, this book could hardly be more relevant to the environmental challenges we face today."--William Cronon, author of Nature's Metropolis: Chicago and the Great West "What a powerful and yet subtle tale of the fraught encounter between the conservationists' desire to 'engineer' wilderness with the property regime of the modern state and the unique, local, 'moral ecologies' of those who resisted! Rarely has this level of originality, close reasoning, and historical texture been brought into such harmony while preserving the whiff of lived experience."--James C. Scott, author of Seeing Like a State
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Betting on Ideas

Wars, Invention, Inflation

Author: Reuven Brenner

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226074016

Category: History

Page: 255

View: 5638

In this book, Reuven Brenner argues that people bet on new ideas and are more willing to take risks when they have been outdone by their fellows on local, national, or international scales. Such bets mean that people deviate from the beaten path and either gamble, commit crimes, or come up with new ideas in art, business, or politics, and ideas concerning war and peace in particular. By using evidence on gambling, crime, and creativity now and during the Industrial Revolution, by examining innovations in English and French inheritance laws and the emergence of welfare legislation, and by looking at what has happened before and after wars, Brenner reaches the conclusion that hope and fear, envy and vanity, sentiments provoked when being leapfrogged, make humans race.
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Making Salmon

An Environmental History of the Northwest Fisheries Crisis

Author: Joseph E. Taylor III

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 9780295989914

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 488

View: 1635

Winner of the George Perkins Marsh Award, American Society for Environmental History
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