Lykophron - Alexandra

Greek Text, Translation, Commentary, and Introduction

Author: Lycophron,Simon Hornblower

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780198810643

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 656

View: 9911

The Alexandra attributed to Lykophron is a minor poetic masterpiece. At 1474 lines, it is one of the most important and notoriously difficult Greek poems dating from the Hellenistic period (most likely the early second century BC). As well as providing the Greek text in full and its English translation, this volume provides the first ever full-length commentary in English on the poem.
Release

Lykophron: Alexandra

Greek Text, Translation, Commentary, and Introduction

Author: Simon Hornblower

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 019957670X

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 600

View: 3352

The Alexandra attributed to Lykophron is a minor poetic masterpiece. At 1474 lines, it is one of the most important and notoriously difficult Greek poems dating from the hellenistic period (most likely the early second century BC). The poem's importance arises from the light which it sheds on Greek religion (in particular the role of women), on foundation myths and myths of colonial identity, and on local - especially Italian - cults and cult places. Thedifficulty of the poem stems from its unusual vocabulary - many words of ancient Greek are found only in this poem - and the riddling and meandering way in which most of the many mythological characters arereferenced. As well as providing the Greek text in full and its English translation, this volume provides the first ever full-length commentary in English on the poem.
Release

The Alexandra of Lycophron

A Literary Study

Author: Associate Professor of Classics Charles McNelis,Markos and Eleni Tsakopoulos Kounalakis Chair of Hellenic Studies Alexander Sens

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199601895

Category:

Page: 232

View: 9779

This monograph is a literary study of Lycophron's Alexandra, whose obscurity, a quality notorious already in antiquity, has long hampered holistic approaches. Through a series of distinct but closely integrated literary studies of major aspects of the poem, including its style, its engagement with the traditions of epic and tragedy, and it's treatment of heroism and of the gods, the book explores the way the Alexandra reconfigures Greek mythology. In particular, as it is presented in Homeric epic and Athenian tragedy, in order to cast the Romans and their restoration of Trojan glory as the ultimate telos of history. In this sense, the poem emerges as an important intermediary between Homeric epic and Latin poetry, particularly Vergil's Aeneid. By rewriting specific features of the epic and tragic traditions, the Alexandra denies to Greek heroes the glory that was the traditional compensation for their suffering, while at the same time attributing to Cassandra's Trojan family honours framed in the traditional language of Greek heroism. In this sense, the figure of Cassandra, a prophetess traditionally gifted with the power of foresight but denied credibility, self-reflexively serves as a vehicle for exploring the potentials and limitations of poetry.
Release

Lykophron's Alexandra, Rome, and the Hellenistic World

Author: Simon Hornblower

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0192524232

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 288

View: 8893

This volume takes as its subject one of the most important Greek poems of the Hellenistic period: the Alexandra attributed to Lykophron, probably written in about 190 BC. At 1474 lines and with a riddling narrative and a preponderance of unusual vocabulary it is a notoriously challenging prospect for scholars, but it also sheds crucial light on Greek religion (in particular the role of women) and on foundation myths and myths of colonial identity. Most of the poem purports to be a prophecy by the Trojan princess, Kassandra, who foretells the conflicts between Europe and Asia from the Trojan Wars to the establishment of Roman ascendancy over the Greek world in the poet's own time. The central section narrates in the future tense the dispersal of returning Greek heroes throughout the Mediterranean zone, and their founding of new cities. This section culminates in the Italian wanderings and foundational activity of the Trojan refugee Aineias, Kassandra's own kinsman. Following Simon Hornblower's detailed full-length commentary on the Alexandra (OUP 2015; paperback 2017), this monograph asserts the poem's importance as not only a strongly political work, but also as a historical document of interest to cultural and religious historians and students of myths of identity. Divided into two Parts, the first explores Lykophron's geopolitical world, paying special attention to south Italy (perhaps the bilingual poet's own area of origin), Sicily, and Rhodes; it suggests that the recent hostile presence of Hannibal in south Italy surfaces as a frequent yet indirectly expressed concern of the poem. The thematic second Part investigates the Alexandra's relation to the Sibylline Oracles and to other apocalyptic literature of the period, and argues for its cultural and religious topicality. The Conclusion puts the case for the 190s BC as a turning-point in Roman history and contends that Lykophron demonstrates a veiled awareness of this, especially of certain peculiar features of Roman colonizing policy in that decade.
Release

Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century

A Survey from ca. 400 BC to ca. AD 400

Author: Vayos Liapis,Antonis K. Petrides

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107038553

Category: History

Page: 410

View: 8379

What happened to Greek tragedy after the death of Euripides? This book provides some answers, and a broad historical overview.
Release

The Returning Hero

nostoi and Traditions of Mediterranean Settlement

Author: Simon Hornblower,Giulia Biffis

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0192539426

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 352

View: 5443

A recurring and significant theme in ancient Greek literature is that of returns and returning, chiefly - but by no means only - of mythical Greek heroes from Troy. One main, and certainly the most 'marked', ancient Greek word for 'return' is nostos (plural nostoi), from which is derived the English 'nostalgia'. Nostos-related traditions were important ingredients of colonial foundation myths and the theme runs through both ancient Greek prose and poetry from Homer's Odyssey to Lykophron's Alexandra, also leaving traces in the historical record through the archaeological and epigraphical commemoration of nostoi, which played a central part in defining Greek ethnicity and crystallizing personal and communal identities. This volume offers a truly interdisciplinary exploration of the concept of nostos in ancient Greek culture, which draws on its contributors' expertise in ancient Greek (and Roman) history, literature, archaeology, and religion. The chapters examine both literary and material evidence in order to achieve a better understanding of the nature of Greek settlement in the Mediterranean zone, and of sometimes equivocal Greek and Roman perceptions of home, displacement, and returning. The special problems and vocabulary of exile are explored in the long Introduction, which offers an incisive yet accessible overview of the volume's key themes and sets its range of contributions clearly in context: while two chapters are concerned in different ways with emotions and personal identity, making use of the theoretical tool of place-attachment, another demonstrates that failed nostoi can be more interesting than successful examples. Evidential absence can be as important and illuminating as presence, and mythical women, underrepresented in this regard, feature extensively in several chapters, which open up a range of new perspectives on nostos.
Release

Herodotus: Histories Book VI

Author: Simon Hornblower,Christopher Pelling

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107029341

Category: History

Page: 354

View: 2319

Treats Herodotus' compelling narrative of the Battle of Marathon. Detailed commentary will aid both translation and literary and historical appreciation.
Release

Thucydides and Pindar

Historical Narrative and the World of Epinikian Poetry

Author: Simon Hornblower

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0199249199

Category: History

Page: 454

View: 1744

Simon Hornblower demonstrates a thematic and literary kinship between Thucydides, one of the greatest of the ancient Greek historians, and Pindar, one of the greatest Greek poets who specialized in celebratory odes for victors in the Olympic Games.
Release

The Meaning of the Letter of Aristeas

In light of biblical interpretation and grammatical tradition, and with reference to its historical context

Author: Ekaterina Matusova

Publisher: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht

ISBN: 3647540439

Category: Fiction

Page: 172

View: 3145

Ekaterin Matusova offers a new approach to the old problems of interpretation of the “Letter of Aristeas”. Chapter 1 deals with the question of the structure of the narrative. Matusova argues that at the time of Aristeas compositions of the kind of the Reworked Pentateuch, or Rewritten Bible were circulating in Egypt in parallel with the LXX and were a source of interpretations of the Hebrew text different from the LXX and of specific combinations of subjects popular in Second Temple Judaism. In particular, Matusova further argues that the leading principle of the composition of the Letter is that of the Reworked Deuteronomy, where subjects referring to the idea of following the Law among the gentiles were grouped together. The analysis is based on a broad circle of Jewish sources, including Philo of Alexandria and documents from the Qumran library. The principle of the composition discovered in this part of the study is referred to as the Jewish paradigm. Chapter 2 offers a new interpretation of the frame story in the narrative, i.e. of the story of the translation in the strict sense. Matusova shows that two paradigms are skilfully combined in this split story: the Jewish one, based on the Bible, and the Greek one, which involves Greek grammatical theory. She further argues that the story, when read in terms of Greek grammar, turns out to be a consistent story not of the translation, but of the correction of the LXX, which is important for our understanding of the early history of the translation. The analysis involves extensive excurses into Greek grammatical theory, including a discussion of Aristotle, Dionysius Thrax and other Hellenistic grammarians. In Chapter 3 Matusova tries to find the reason for the combination of these two paradigms, namely the Jewish biblical paradigm and the Greek grammatical ones, and to interpret their interconnected meaning, by placing it in the broad historical context of the Ptolemaic state.
Release

Euripides, "Alexandros"

Introduction, Text and Commentary

Author: Ioanna Karamanou

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 3110537281

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 396

View: 957

This is the first full-scale commentary on Euripides’ Alexandros, which is one of the best preserved fragmentary tragedies. It yields insight into aspects of Euripidean style, ideology and dramatic technique (e.g. rhetoric, stagecraft and imagery) and addresses textual and philological matters, on the basis of a re-inspection of the papyrus fragments. This book offers a reconstruction of the play and an investigation of issues of characterization, staging, textual transmission and reception, not least because Alexandros has enjoyed a fascinating Nachleben in literary, dramaturgical and performative terms. It also contributes to the readers’ understanding of the trends of later Euripidean drama, especially the dramatist’s innovation and experimentation with plot-patterns and staging conventions. Furthermore, the analysis of Alexandros could stimulate a more comprehensive reading of the extant Trojan Women coming from the same production, which bears the features of a ‘connected trilogy’. Thus, the information retrieved through the interrogation of the rich fragmentary material serves to supplement and contextualize the extant tragic corpus, showcasing the vitality and multiformity of Euripidean drama as a whole.
Release

Critics, Compilers, and Commentators

An Introduction to Roman Philology, 200 BCE-800 CE

Author: James E. G. Zetzel

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0195380517

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 446

View: 5596

"To teach correct Latin and to explain the poets" were the two standard duties of Roman teachers, and philology - the study of Latin language and texts - was important at Rome. Not only was a command of literary Latin a prerequisite for political and social advancement, but a sense of Latin'shistory and importance contributed to the Romans' sense of their larger cultural identity. In this important and original study James Zetzel traces the changing role and status of Latin as revealed in the ways it was explained and taught by the Romans themselves. Zetzel explores ideas about theorigins of Latin and the nature of linguistic correctness; he provides an innovative account of the interconnections in Rome among philology, philosophy, rhetoric, law, and religion (both classical and Christian); and he charts the transformations of the Latin language and methods of instruction asthe people using Latin became increasingly remote from its Roman origins: in the Greek East, in the Roman and then Vandal North Africa, Visigothic Spain, and ultimately Ireland, where a rich and exotic Christian understanding of Latin flourished in the seventh and eighth centuries. Critics, Compilers, and Commentators is the first comprehensive introduction to the history, forms, and texts of Roman philology. A great many Latin dictionaries, glossaries, commentaries, grammars, metrical handbooks, and other forms of scholarship survive from antiquity and the early middle ages,some unpublished and many of them difficult to find and identify. Zetzel provides a descriptive bibliography of hundreds of them, listing editions, translations, and secondary literature. This book recovers a neglected but crucial area of Roman intellectual life, and it will be an essential resourcefor students of Roman literature and intellectual history, medievalists, and historians of education and language science.
Release

Homer and the Poetics of Hades

Author: George Alexander Gazis

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019878726X

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 9674

Homer and the Poetics of Hades offers a new and unique approach to the Iliad and, more particularly, the Odyssey through an exploration of the role and function of the Underworld as a poetic resource permitting an alternative perspective on the epic past. By portraying Hades as a realm where vision is not possible, Homer creates a unique poetic environment in which social constraints and divine prohibitions do not apply, resulting in a narrative which emulates that of the Muses but which at the same time is markedly distinct from it. In Hades experimentation with, and alteration of, important epic forms and values can be pursued with greater freedom, giving rise to a different kind of poetics: the 'poetics of Hades'. In the Iliad, Homer offers us a glimpse of how this alternative poetics works through the visit of Patroclus' shade in Achilles' dream. The recollection offered by the shade reveals an approach to its past in which regret, self-pity, and a lingering memory of intimate and emotional moments displace an objective tone and traditional exposition of heroic values. However, the potential of Hades for providing alternative means of commemorating the past is more fully explored in the 'Nekyia' of Odyssey 11: there, Odysseus' extraordinary ability to see the dead in Hades allows him to meet and interview the shades of heroines and heroes of the epic past, while the absolute confinement of Hades allows the shades to recount their stories from their own personal points of view. The poetic implications are significant, since by visiting Hades and listening to the stories of the shades Odysseus, and Homer with him, gain access to a tradition in which epic values associated with gender roles and even divine law are suspended in favour of a more immediate and personally inflected approach to the epic past. As readers, this alternative poetics offers us more than just a revised framework within which to navigate the Iliad and the Odyssey, inviting as it does a more nuanced understanding of the Greeks' anxieties around mortality and posthumous fame.
Release

The Greek World 479-323 BC

Author: Simon Hornblower

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136831258

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 4003

The Greek World 479-323 BC has been an indispensable guide to classical Greek history since its first publication nearly thirty years ago. Now Simon Hornblower has comprehensively revised and partly rewritten his original text, bringing it up-to-date for yet another generation of readers. In particular, this fourth edition takes full account of recent and detailed scholarship on Greek poleis across the Hellenic world, allowing for further development of the key theme of regional variety across the Mediterranean and beyond. Other extensive changes include a new sub-chapter on Islands, a completely updated bibliography, and revised citation of epigraphic material relating to the fourth-century BC. With valuable coverage of the broader Mediterranean world in which Greek culture flourished, as well as close examination of Athens, Sparta, and the other great city-states of Greece itself, this fourth edition of a classic work is a more essential read than ever before.
Release

A Commentary on Thucydides: Books IV-V.24

Author: Simon Hornblower

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199276257

Category: Greece

Page: 544

View: 5596

This is the second volume of a three-volume historical and literary commentary of the eight books of Thucydides, the great fifth-century BC historian of the Peloponnesian War between Athens and Sparta. Books IV-V. 24 cover the years 425-421 BC and contain the Pylos-Spakteria narrative, the Delion Campaign, and Brasidas' operations in the north of Greece. This volume ends with the Peace of Nikias and the alliance between Athens and Sparta. A valuable feature of this volume is thefull thematic introduction which discusses such topics as Thucydides and Herodotus, Thucydides' presentation of Brasidas, Thucydides and kinship, speech - direct and indirect - in IV-V. 24, Thucydides and epigraphy (including personal names), IV-V. 24 as a work of art: innovative or merely incomplete? Thucydides intended his work to be `an everlasting possession' and the continuing importance of his work is undisputed. Simon Hornblower's commentary, by translating every passage of Greek commented on, for the first time allows readers with little or no Greek to appreciate the detail of Thucydides' thought and subject-matter. A full index is provided at the end of the volume.
Release

The Muse at Play

Riddles and Wordplay in Greek and Latin Poetry

Author: Jan Kwapisz,David Petrain,Mikolaj Szymanski

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN: 3110270617

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 429

View: 2615

Riddles and other word games are widespread in classical literature and played a crucial role in shaping Greek and Roman cultural discourses, yet few efforts have been made to treat them in all their variety and complexity. This volume, the fruit of a conference held in May 2011 by the Institute of Classical Studies of the University of Warsaw, gathers contributions on a range of topics linked by the theme of linguistic play. With its broad spectrum of approaches, the book serves as companion to a fascinating but somewhat neglected area of ancient culture - the domain of the Playful Muse.
Release

Hellenistic Tragedy

Texts, Translations and a Critical Survey

Author: Agnieszka Kotlinska-Toma

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472523946

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

View: 9680

Ancient Greek tragedy is ubiquitously studied and researched, but is generally considered to have ended, as it began, in the fifth century BC. However, plays continued to be written and staged in the Greek world for centuries, enjoying a period of unprecedented popularity and changing significantly from the better known Classical drama. Hellenistic drama also heavily influenced the birth of Roman tragedy and the development of other theatrical forms and literature (including comedies, mime and Greek romance). Hellenistic Tragedy: Texts, Translations and a Critical Survey offers a comprehensive picture of tragedy and the satyr play from the fourth century BCE. The surviving fragments of this dramatic genre are presented, alongside English translations and critical analysis, as well as a survey of the main writers involved and an exploration of the genre's formation, later influence and staging. Key features of the plays are analysed through extant texts and other evidence, including plots based on contemporary political themes, mythical subjects and Biblical themes, and features of metre and language. Practical elements of Hellenistic performance are also discussed, including those which have become the hallmarks of ancient theatre: actors' costumes of long robes, kothurnoi and high onkos-masks, the theatre building and the closed stage on the logeion. Piecing together a synthetic picture of Hellenistic tragedy and the satyr play, the volume also examines the key points of departure from earlier drama, including the mass audience, the mutual influence of Greek and Eastern traditions and the changes inside the genre which prove Hellenistic drama was an important stage in the development of the European theatre.
Release

Herodotus:

Author: E.I. McQueen

Publisher: Bristol Classical Press

ISBN: 9781853995866

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 192

View: 9931

The Sixth Book of Herodotus covers the history of Greece in the first decade of the fifth century BC, including such momentous events as the Ionian revolt and the Marathon Campaign. This commentary, aimed at undergraduates and sixth-formers, is intended to introduce them to the work of one of the most significant and entertaining writers of his day, whose influence on the development of prose literature in general and historiography in particular was of paramount importance. This edition is intended to replace that of E.S. Shuckburgh, first published in 1889 at a time when the student's knowledge of Greek grammar and syntax was very much greater than is the case today. In addition several generations of scholars have broadened immeasurably our understanding of Greek history since Shuckburgh's day. Accordingly this commentary explains points of grammar and syntax while at the same time covering the historical interpretation. The book reproduces Schuckburgh's Greek text, but comes with a new introduction and up-to-date bibliography.
Release

Pindar and the Poetics of Permanence

Author: Henry Spelman

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0192554409

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 344

View: 541

Whereas the last several decades of scholarship on early Greek lyric have been primarily concerned with the immediate contexts of first performance, this volume turns its attention instead to the rhetoric and realities of poetic permanence, providing the first book-length study devoted to this topic. Taking Pindar and archaic Greek literary culture as its focus, it offers a new reading of Pindar's victory odes which explores not only how they were received by those who first experienced them, but also what they can mean to later audiences like us. Divided into two parts, the discussion first investigates Pindar's relationship to both of these audiences, demonstrating how Pindaric epinicia address the listeners present at their premiere performance and also a broader secondary audience across space and time, with Part One arguing that a full appreciation of these texts involves simultaneously assuming the perspectives of both of these audiences. Following on from this, Part Two describes how Pindar engages with a wide variety of other poetry, particularly earlier lyric, in order to situate his work both within an immanent poetic history and a contemporary poetic culture. In setting out his vision of the literary world, both past and present, the volume ably shows how this framework shaped the meaning of his work and illuminates the context within which he anticipated its permanence, offering new insights into the texts themselves and, more broadly, a re-thinking of the nature of early Greek poetic culture through a combination of historical and literary perspectives.
Release