Live It Again 1952

Author: Annie's,Barb Sprunger

Publisher: Annie's

ISBN: 9781592173488

Category: United States

Page: 130

View: 6767

"Featuring the best of The Saturday Evening Post"--Cover.
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Play it Again

Cover Songs in Popular Music

Author: George Plasketes

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 0754699919

Category: Music

Page: 280

View: 9839

The cover phenomenon in popular culture may be viewed as a postmodern manifestation in music as artists revisit, reinterpret and re-examine a significant cross section of musical styles, periods, genres, individual records, and other artists and their catalogues of works. The cover complex, with its multiple variations, issues, contexts, and re-contextualizations comprises an important and rich popular culture text. These re-recordings represent artifacts which embody artistic, social, cultural, historical, commercial, biographical, and novel meanings. Through homage, allusion, apprenticeship, and parody, among other modes, these diverse musical quotations express, preserve, and distribute popular culture, popular music and their intersecting historical narratives. Play it Again represents the first collection of critical perspectives on the many facets of cover songs in popular music.
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Debut: Chicago, 1952

Author: Frank Holland

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 1469101440

Category: Fiction

Page: 415

View: 3333

Against a background of illegal gay bars and varied people who patronized them, we see the double life gays led during the closeted 1950s. Louie, after his first sexual experience, moves to Chicago to be with Joey, the factory worker who brought him out. Joey, reluctant to be involved, encourages Louie to restrict gay life to nighttime and weekends while appearing straight at work or with ones family and straight friends. Later their pretended buddy-buddy friendship is further complicated when the two jointly undertake the care of Joeys mother, who is dying of cancer. Chicago, during the closeted 1950s, when even the meaning of the word GAY took a divergent path. Book Reviews "Beautifully rendered semi-autobiographical fiction that sheds light on a little-studied era in American cultural history, and a very plausible picture of pre-gay rights America during the age of Eisenhower. DEBUT is not only the story of a life, but a valuable cross-section of gay culture in pre-Stonewall Chicago. Holland's prose is admirably unpretentious, and he has a journalist's eye for detail. He keeps a respectful distance from his characters and tells their stories -- and his, for that matter -- with objectivity and grace. This perfect balance allows him to avoid coming off as either hyper clinical or melodramatic. While the literary landscape of the book is home to more than a few eccentric figures, the author's tack keeps them from ever turning into camp stereotypes. A gorgeous near-memoir." --Kirkus Discoveries
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Phenomenology and Social Reality

Essays in Memory of Alfred Schutz

Author: Maurice Natanson

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9401175233

Category: Philosophy

Page: 308

View: 3312

Alfred Schutz was born in Vienna on April 13, 1899, and died in New York City on May 20, 1959. The year 1969, then, marks the seventieth anniversary of his birth and the tenth year of his death. The essays which follow are offered not only as a tribute to an irreplaceable friend, colleague, and teacher, but as evidence of the contributors' conviction of the eminence of his work. No special pleading is needed here to support that claim, for it is widely acknowledged that his ideas have had a significant impact on present-day philosophy and phenomenology of the social sciences. In place of either argument or evaluation, I choose to restrict myself to some bi~ graphical information and a fragmentary memoir. * The only child of Johanna and Otto Schutz (an executive in a private bank in Vienna), Alfred attended the Esterhazy Gymnasium in Vienna, an academic high school whose curriculum included eight years of Latin and Greek. He graduated at seventeen - in time to spend one year of service in the Austrian army in the First World War. For bravery at the front on the battlefield in Italy, he was decorated by his country. After the war ended, he entered the University of Vienna, completing a four year curriculum in only two and one half years and receiving his doctorate in Law.
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Der unsichtbare Mann

Roman

Author: Ralph Ellison

Publisher: Aufbau Digital

ISBN: 3841216978

Category: Fiction

Page: 688

View: 9433

„Einer der bedeutendsten Autoren der amerikanischen Nachkriegsliteratur.“ Paul Ingendaay, F.A.Z. Ralph Ellison ist neben Toni Morrison und James Baldwin eine der großen Stimmen des afroamerikanischen Romans der Gegenwart. Sein Meisterwerk zeugt von künstlerischer Kraft und ist hochaktuell – als schonungslose Abrechnung mit den alltäglichen rassistischen Ideologien und Verhaltensweisen und als Lob auf das gewachsene Selbstbewusstsein der noch immer um ihre selbstverständlichen Rechte Kämpfenden: Der namenlose Ich-Erzähler verliert sein Stipendium, weil er einem Förderer des von Weißen eingerichteten Südstaaten-Colleges für Schwarze nicht die gewünschte Kulisse, sondern die Realität der Farbigen vor Augen führt. Er muss sein Glück dort suchen, wo es Arbeit gibt, und landet in Harlem, einem brodelnden Hexenkessel, inmitten von schwarzem Glamour und Blue Notes, Swing und Spirituals, politischen Aufwieglern, gerissenen Gaunern und verlorenen Spinnern.
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Brotherhood of the Bomb

The Tangled Lives and Loyalties of Robert Oppenheimer, Ernest Lawrence, and Edward Teller

Author: Gregg Herken

Publisher: Henry Holt and Company

ISBN: 1466851554

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 350

The fascinating story of the men who founded the nuclear age, fully told for the first time The story of the twentieth century is largely the story of the power of science and technology. Within that story is the incredible tale of the human conflict between Robert Oppenheimer, Ernest Lawrence, and Edward Teller-the scientists most responsible for the advent of weapons of mass destruction. How did science-and its practitioners-enlisted in the service of the state during the Second World War, become a slave to its patron during the Cold War? The story of these three men, builders of the bombs, is fundamentally about loyalty-to country, to science, and to each other-and about the wrenching choices that had to be made when these allegiances came into conflict. Gregg Herken gives us the behind-the-scenes account based upon a decade of research, interviews, and newly released Freedom of Information Act and Russian documents. Brotherhood of the Bomb is a vital slice of American history told authoritatively-and grippingly-for the first time.
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Report of the County Chairman

Author: James A. Michener

Publisher: Dial Press Trade Paperback

ISBN: 0804159246

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 224

View: 5812

James A. Michener, the acclaimed author of sweeping historical blockbusters, chronicles his personal involvement in one of the most dramatic elections of the twentieth century: the presidential race between John F. Kennedy and Richard Nixon. A relative newcomer to politics, Michener served as the Democratic chairman in his native Bucks County, Pennsylvania, in a rural battleground precinct where the major controversies of the day—notably Kennedy’s Catholicism—brought cultural divides to the forefront. First published shortly after the 1960 election, Report of the County Chairman remains an intimate, gripping account of the power of grassroots political involvement. BONUS: This edition includes an excerpt from James A. Michener's Hawaii. Praise for Report of the County Chairman “A candid account of the Kennedy/Nixon campaign.”—The Philadelphia Inquirer “Fascinating . . . The personalities are vividly and vigorously sketched—the workers, the volunteers, the hatchet men, the pros and . . . key figures on the barnstorming tour.”—Kirkus Reviews “Instructive . . . Anti-Catholicism was not just a Southern problem. In Pennsylvania, accounts of increasing anti-Catholicism were widespread. No one documented this sentiment more clearly than famed Pennsylvania novelist James Michener.”—The Morning Call (Allentown, Pennsylvania)
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Film Quotations

11,000 Lines Spoken on Screen, Arranged by Subject, and Indexed

Author: Robert A. Nowlan,Gwendolyn W. Nowlan

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 147662058X

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 776

View: 3689

Certain lines define a movie. Marlene Dietrich in Morocco: “Anyone who has faith in me is a sucker.” Too, there are lines that fit actor and character. Mae West in I’m No Angel: “I’m very quick in a slow way.” Jane Fonda in California Suite: “Fit? You think I look fit? What an awful shit you are. I look gorgeous.” From the classics to the grade–B slasher movies, over 11,000 quotes are arranged by over 900 subjects, like accidents, double entendres, eyes (and other body parts!), ice cream, luggage, parasites, and ugliness. Each quote gives the movie title, production company, year of release, speaker of the line, and, when appropriate, a comment putting the quote in context.
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Reporting America

The Life of the Nation 1946 - 2004

Author: Alistair Cooke

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141909218

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 6300

Alistair Cooke was the greatest of all twentieth century reporters of life in America to the rest of the world. Published to celebrate the centenary of his birth, this book presents the cream of his writings on the events that shaped modern American history, from the end of the Second World War through to the assassination of John Kennedy and of Bobby Kennedy (Cooke was actually present), the moon landings and the Monica Lewinsky scandal. Almost all the material is previously unpublished in book form - transcripts of his legendary Letters from America, long-forgotten reports in the Guardian (whose correspondent in New York he was for 25 years) and other freshly discovered writings. The book will be illustrated throughout in full colour with iconic photographs of the events Cooke is describing.
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When We Build Again

Author: Bournville Village Trust

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134549598

Category: Architecture

Page: 328

View: 675

Like many UK cities Birmingham was heavily bombed during the Second World War and as with so many bombed British cities, and many un-bombed ones that jumped on to the re-planning bandwagon, there was a clear imperative to reconstruct. But Birmingham was atypical in how it went about this. The city had begun planning in the mid-1930s, principally to replace vast quantities of slum housing – and there had been suggestions about ring roads even from the time of the First World War. So plans were available virtually ready to go, and were approved by a private Act of Parliament in 1946. Yet within Birmingham there were individuals and organisations with a great interest and influence in planning matters. This followed a significant and long-standing local tradition from the Chamberlain family to Nettlefold’s pioneering work on planning and housing at the start of the twentieth century. Prominent amongst these was the Cadbury family and the Bournville Village Trust, and one of its immediate responses to bomb damage was the book, When We Build Again. This was immediately influential in several respects, as contemporary reviews and ongoing citations demonstrate. It highlighted some less-palatable truths about conditions in the city and more widely, with ideas about what might be done. To modern eyes some of these are radical – for example the wholesale redevelopment of the Jewellery Quarter – an area which was recently proposed for World Heritage status. The origins of the derided post-war comprehensive clearance approach lie in these papers. Further, it used innovative and striking graphics to communicate statistical information to lay readers, including the use of striking photography of places and, particularly, people. Also included in this volume is a facsimile of a second Bournville Trust publication from 1955, Birmingham - Fifty Years On. This less famous but equally important publication grew from a frustration at the slow pace of post-war reconstruction, and envisaged what the city would look like half a century later.
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The Blue Angel - The Life and Films of Marlene Dietrich

Author: David Stuart Ryan

Publisher: kozmik press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 192

View: 5175

The story of Marlene Dietrich's life is the story of the 20th century. Author David Stuart Ryan who wrote the bestselling biography 'John Lennon's Secret' explores the amazing and circuitous route that took her to Hollywood and riches. But to understand the essential Marlene it is necessary to go right back in time to the era of La Belle Epoque when a very feudal and settled order still existed in Europe. 'The Blue Angel' transports you to a glittering world that is all about to disappear in the maelstrom of world war. What emerges from the conflict is a feverish gaiety that seeks to put behind it all the suffering that has taken place. You are entering the Jazz Age and a Berlin that having suffered hyperinflation decides anything goes. The Berliner Luft - the Berlin air - is what the locals call it. This madcap atmosphere was to be recreated by a young journalist - Billy Wilder - when he made the journey to Hollywood. Indeed, the plot for his greatest film, 'Some Like It Hot', drew on his experiences in Berlin, and Billy Wilder was one of the respondents to the author when he came to write Marlene's story. Marlene's big break came when she played a vampish nightclub singer of dubious morals, not a million miles away from her own background trying to survive in a world turned upside down. 'The Blue Angel' took her to America and a carefully constructed film star image which embodies all the dazzling wealth and influence of Hollywood at its most powerful and hypnotic. Yet the more you get into the life of Marlene Dietrich, the greater the mystery becomes. Who was she really? Only now can the expert analysis of David Stuart Ryan reveal the true Marlene Dietrich, the person behind the image, the human being behind the facade. Was she indeed the blue angel?
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Rum, Romanism, and Rebellion

The Making of a President, 1884

Author: Mark Wahlgren Summers

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807875112

Category: History

Page: 408

View: 7225

The presidential election of 1884, in which Grover Cleveland ended the Democrats' twenty-four-year presidential drought by defeating Republican challenger James G. Blaine, was one of the gaudiest in American history, remembered today less for its political significance than for the mudslinging and slander that characterized the campaign. But a closer look at the infamous election reveals far more complexity than previous stereotypes allowed, argues Mark Summers. Behind all the mud and malarkey, he says, lay a world of issues and consequences. Summers suggests that both Democrats and Republicans sensed a political system breaking apart, or perhaps a new political order forming, as voters began to drift away from voting by party affiliation toward voting according to a candidate's stand on specific issues. Mudslinging, then, was done not for public entertainment but to tear away or confirm votes that seemed in doubt. Uncovering the issues that really powered the election and stripping away the myths that still surround it, Summers uses the election of 1884 to challenge many of our preconceptions about Gilded Age politics.
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Scottsboro

Picador Classic

Author: Ellen Feldman

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 1447275357

Category: Fiction

Page: N.A

View: 1098

With an introduction by Jayne Anne Phillips Shortlisted for the Orange Prize for Fiction, a novel inspired by the shocking true story of the Scottsboro boys. Even after all these years, the injustice still stuns. Innocent boys sentenced to die, not for a crime they did not commit, but for a crime that never occurred. Lives splintered as casually as wood being hacked for kindling. Alabama, 1931. A freight train is stopped in Scottsboro, nine black youths are brutally arrested and, within minutes, the cry of rape goes up from two white girls. In the shocking aftermath, one sticks to her story whilst the other keeps changing her mind, and an impassioned young journalist must try to save nine boys from the electric chair, one girl from a lie and herself from the clutches of the past . . . Stirring racism, sexism and the politics of a divided America into an explosive brew, Scottsboro gives voice to the victims - black and white - of this infamous case. Shortlisted for the Orange Prize for Fiction in 2009, Ellen Feldman's classic charts a fight for justice during the burgeoning civil-rights movement.
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"That the People Might Live"

Loss and Renewal in Native American Elegy

Author: Arnold Krupat

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801465419

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 256

View: 8456

The word "elegy" comes from the Ancient Greek elogos, meaning a mournful poem or song, in particular, a song of grief in response to loss. Because mourning and memorialization are so deeply embedded in the human condition, all human societies have developed means for lamenting the dead, and, in "That the People Might Live" Arnold Krupat surveys the traditions of Native American elegiac expression over several centuries. Krupat covers a variety of oral performances of loss and renewal, including the Condolence Rites of the Iroquois and the memorial ceremony of the Tlingit people known as koo'eex, examining as well a number of Ghost Dance songs, which have been reinterpreted in culturally specific ways by many different tribal nations. Krupat treats elegiac "farewell" speeches of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries in considerable detail, and comments on retrospective autobiographies by Black Hawk and Black Elk. Among contemporary Native writers, he looks at elegiac work by Linda Hogan, N. Scott Momaday, Gerald Vizenor, Sherman Alexie, Maurice Kenny, and Ralph Salisbury, among others. Despite differences of language and culture, he finds that death and loss are consistently felt by Native peoples both personally and socially: someone who had contributed to the People's well-being was now gone. Native American elegiac expression offered mourners consolation so that they might overcome their grief and renew their will to sustain communal life.
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We Just Want To Live Here

A Palestinian Teenager, an Israeli Teenager, An Unlikely Friendship

Author: Amal Rifa'i,Odelia Ainbinder,Sylke Tempel

Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin

ISBN: 1429979763

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 176

View: 2380

Palestinian Amal Rifa'i and Israeli Odelia Ainbinder are two teenage girls who live in the same city, yet worlds apart. They met on a student exchange program to Switzerland. Weeks after they returned, the latest, violent Intifada broke out in the fall of 2000. But two years later, Middle East correspondent Sylke Tempel encouraged Amal and Odelia to develop their friendship by facilitating an exchange of their deepest feelings through letters. In their letters, Amal and Odelia discuss the Intifada, their families, traditions, suicide bombers, and military service. They write frankly of their anger, frustrations, and fear, but also of their hopes and dreams for a brighter future. Together, Amal and Odelia give us a renewed sense of hope for peace in the Middle East, in We Just Want To Live Here.
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James Brown's Live at the Apollo

Author: Douglas Wolk

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1441150900

Category: Social Science

Page: 128

View: 8916

In this remarkable book, Douglas Wolk brings to life an October evening in 1962, at the Apollo Theatre in Harlem ? an evening at the height of Cold War tensions. In great detail, Wolk pieces together what took place (and what was recorded) that night, and illustrates beautifully the enduring power of one of James Brown's ? and popular music's ? defining moments: Live at the Apollo.
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Letters Between a Father and Son

Author: V. S. Naipaul

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 0330507044

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 352

View: 4851

In 1950, V. S. Naipaul travelled from Trinidad to England to take up a place at Oxford University. Over the next few years, letters passed back and forth between Naipaul and his family – particularly his beloved father Seepersad, but also his mother and siblings. The result is a fascinating chronicle of Naipaul’s time at university; the love of writing that he shared with his father and their mutual nurturing of literary ambition; the triumphs and depressions of Oxford life; and the travails of his family back at home. This engrossing collection continues into the early years of V. S. Naipaul’s literary career, touching time and again on the craft of writing, and revealing the relationships and experiences that formed and influenced one of the greatest and most enigmatic literary figures of our age. ‘Rare and precious . . . if any modern writer was going to breathe a last gasp into the epistolary tradition, it was always likely to be V. S. Naipaul’ New Statesman ‘Remarkable’ Literary Review ‘A very moving book’ James Wood, London Review of Books ‘A fascinating psychological narrative’ The Times
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