Literature and Journalism in Antebellum America

Thoreau, Stowe, and Their Contemporaries Respond to the Rise of the Commercial Press

Author: M. Canada

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230118593

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 203

View: 1912

Explores the sibling rivalry that emerged in the American literary marketplace in the decades after the advent of the penny press, showing how journalism became a target, a counterpoint, and even a model for numerous American authors, including Thoreau, Cooper, Poe, and Stowe.
Release

Literature and Journalism

Inspirations, Intersections, and Inventions from Ben Franklin to Stephen Colbert

Author: Mark Canada

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137329300

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 246

View: 951

The first of its kind, this collection will explore the ways that literature and journalism have intersected in the work of American writers. Covering the impact of the newspaper on Whitman's poetry, nineteenth-century reporters' fabrications, and Stephen Colbert's alternative journalism, this book will illuminate and inform.
Release

Between the Novel and the News

The Emergence of American Women's Writing

Author: Sari Edelstein

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 0813935911

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 7971

While American literary history has long acknowledged the profound influence of journalism on canonical male writers, Sari Edelstein argues that American women writers were also influenced by a dynamic relationship with the mainstream press. From the early republic through the turn of the twentieth century, she offers a comprehensive reassessment of writers such as Catharine Maria Sedgwick, Harriet Jacobs, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Drawing on slave narratives, sentimental novels, and realist fiction, Edelstein examines how advances in journalism—including the emergence of the penny press, the rise of the story-paper, and the birth of eyewitness reportage—shaped not only a female literary tradition but also gender conventions themselves. Excluded from formal politics and lacking the vote, women writers were deft analysts of the prevalent tropes and aesthetic gestures of journalism, which they alternately relied upon and resisted in their efforts to influence public opinion and to intervene in political debates. Ultimately, Between the Novel and the News is a project of recovery that transforms our understanding of the genesis and the development of American women’s writing.
Release

The Undeclared War between Journalism and Fiction

Journalists as Genre Benders in Literary History

Author: D. Underwood

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137353481

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 250

View: 2463

In this volume, Doug Underwood asks whether much of what is now called literary journalism is, in fact, 'literary,' and whether it should rank with the great novels by such journalist-literary figures as Twain, Cather, and Hemingway, who believed that fiction was the better place for a realistic writer to express the important truths of life.
Release

Edgar Allan Poe in Context

Author: Kevin J. Hayes

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107310806

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: N.A

View: 2183

Edgar Allan Poe mastered a variety of literary forms over the course of his brief and turbulent career. As a storyteller, Poe defied convention by creating Gothic tales of mystery, horror and suspense that remain widely popular today. This collection demonstrates how Poe's experience of early nineteenth-century American life fueled his iconoclasm and shaped his literary legacy. Rather than provide critical explications of his writings, each essay explores one aspect of Poe's immediate environment, using pertinent writings - verse, fiction, reviews and essays - to suit. Examining his geographical, social and literary contexts, as well as those created by the publishing industry and advances in science and technology, the essays paint an unprecedented portrait of Poe's life and times. Written for a wide audience, the collection will offer scholars and students of American literature, historians and general readers new insight into Poe's rich and complex work.
Release

Introduction to Information Literacy for Students

Author: Michael C. Alewine,Mark Canada

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1119054753

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 2361

Introduction to Information Literacy for Students presents a concise, practical guide to navigating information in the digital age. Features a unique step-by-step method that can be applied to any research project Includes research insights from professionals, along with review exercises, insiders' tips and tools, search screen images utilized by students, and more Encourages active inquiry-based learning through the inclusion of various study questions and exercises Provides students with effective research strategies to serve them through their academic years and professional careers Ensures accessibility and a strong instructional approach due to authorship by a librarian and award-winning English professor
Release

About Chekhov

The Unfinished Symphony

Author: Ivan Bunin

Publisher: Northwestern University Press

ISBN: 0810123886

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 156

View: 3308

Seven years after the death of Anton Chekhov, his sister, Maria, wrote to a friend, "You asked for someone who could write a biography of my deceased brother. If you recall, I recommended Iv. Al. Bunin . . . . No one writes better than he; he knew and understood my deceased brother very well; he can go about the endeavor objectively. . . . I repeat, I would very much like this biography to correspond to reality and that it be written by I.A. Bunin." In About Chekhov Ivan Bunin sought to free the writer from limiting political, social, and aesthetic assessments of his life and work, and to present both in a more genuine, insightful, and personal way. Editor and translator Thomas Gaiton Marullo subtitles About Chekhov "The Unfinished Symphony," because although Bunin did not complete the work before his death in 1953, he nonetheless fashioned his memoir as a moving orchestral work on the writers' existence and art. . . . "Even in its unfinished state, About Chekhov stands not only as a stirring testament of one writer's respect and affection for another, but also as a living memorial to two highly creative artists." Bunin draws on his intimate knowledge of Chekhov to depict the writer at work, in love, and in relation with such writers as Tolstoy and Gorky. Through anecdotes and observations, spirited exchanges and reflections, this memoir draws a unique portrait that plumbs the depths and complexities of two of Russia's greatest writers.
Release

Edinburgh Companion to Nineteenth-Century American Letters and Letter-Writing

Author: Celeste-Marie Bernier

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748692940

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 752

View: 3273

This comprehensive study by leading scholars in an important new field-the history of letters and letter writing-is essential reading for anyone interested in nineteenth-century American politics, history or literature. Because of its mass literacy, population mobility, and extensive postal system, nineteenth-century America is a crucial site for the exploration of letters and their meanings, whether they be written by presidents and statesmen, scientists and philosophers, novelists and poets, feminists and reformers, immigrants, Native Americans, or African Americans. This book breaks new ground by mapping the voluminous correspondence of these figures and other important American writers and thinkers. Rather than treating the letter as a spontaneous private document, the contributors understand it as a self-conscious artefact, circulating between friends and strangers and across multiple genres in ways that both make and break social ties.
Release

From Fact to Fiction

Journalism & Imaginative Writing in America

Author: Shelley Fisher Fishkin

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 019520638X

Category: History

Page: 265

View: 1183

Discusses the lives and careers of Whitman, Twain, Dreiser, Hemingway, and DosPassos, each of whom began as journalists
Release

A Brief History of American Literature

Author: Richard Gray

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781444392463

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 420

View: 2364

A Brief History of American Literature offers students and general readers a concise and up-to-date history of the full range of American writing from its origins until the present day. Represents the only up-to-date concise history of American literature Covers fiction, poetry, drama and non-fiction, as well as looking at other forms of literature including folktales, spirituals, the detective story, the thriller and science fiction Considers how our understanding of American literature has changed over the past twenty years Offers students an abridged version of History of American Literature, a book widely considered the standard survey text Provides an invaluable introduction to the subject for students of American literature, American studies and all those interested in the literature and culture of the United States
Release

Times Square Red, Times Square Blue

Author: Samuel R. Delany

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814744338

Category: Social Science

Page: 203

View: 929

If one street in America can claim to be the most infamous, it is surely 42nd Street. Between Seventh and Eighth Avenues, 42nd Street was once known for its peep shows, street corner hustlers and movie houses. Over the last two decades the notion of safety-from safe sex and safe neighborhoods, to safe cities and safe relationships-has overcome 42nd Street, giving rise to a Disney store, a children's theater, and large, neon-lit cafes. 42nd Street has, in effect, become a family tourist attraction for visitors from Berlin, Tokyo, Westchester, and New Jersey's suburbs. Samuel R. Delany sees a disappearance not only of the old Times Square, but of the complex social relationships that developed there: the points of contact between people of different classes and races in a public space. In Times Square Red, Times Square Blue, Delany tackles the question of why public restrooms, peepshows, and tree-filled parks are necessary to a city's physical and psychological landscape. He argues that starting in 1985, New York City criminalized peep shows and sex movie houses to clear the way for the rebuilding of Times Square. Delany's critique reveals how Times Square is being "renovated" behind the scrim of public safety while the stage is occupied by gentrification. Times Square Red, Times Square Blue paints a portrait of a society dismantling the institutions that promote communication between classes, and disguising its fears of cross-class contact as "family values." Unless we overcome our fears and claim our "community of contact," it is a picture that will be replayed in cities across America.
Release

The Flash Press

Sporting Male Weeklies in 1840s New York

Author: Patricia Cline Cohen,Timothy J. Gilfoyle,Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz,American Antiquarian Society

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226112357

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 288

View: 3360

Obscene, libidinous, loathsome, lascivious. Those were just some of the ways critics described the nineteenth-century weeklies that covered and publicized New York City’s extensive sexual underworld. Publications like the Flash and the Whip—distinguished by a captivating brew of lowbrow humor and titillating gossip about prostitutes, theater denizens, and sporting events—were not the sort generally bound in leather for future reference, and despite their popularity with an enthusiastic readership, they quickly receded into almost complete obscurity. Recently, though, two sizable collections of these papers have resurfaced, and in The Flash Press three renowned scholars provide a landmark study of their significance as well as a wide selection of their ribald articles and illustrations. Including short tales of urban life, editorials on prostitution, and moralizing rants against homosexuality, these selections epitomize a distinct form of urban journalism. Here, in addition to providing a thorough overview of this colorful reportage, its editors, and its audience, the authors examine nineteenth-century ideas of sexuality and freedom that mixed Tom Paine’s republicanism with elements of the Marquis de Sade’s sexual ideology. They also trace the evolution of censorship and obscenity law, showing how a string of legal battles ultimately led to the demise of the flash papers: editors were hauled into court, sentenced to jail for criminal obscenity and libel, and eventually pushed out of business. But not before they forever changed the debate over public sexuality and freedom of expression in America’s most important city.
Release

A Glossary of Literary Terms

Author: M.H. Abrams,Geoffrey Harpham

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN: 1285974514

Category: Education

Page: 448

View: 2198

First published over fifty years ago, A GLOSSARY OF LITERARY TERMS remains an essential text for all serious students of literature. Now fully updated to reflect the latest scholarship on recent and rapidly evolving critical theories, the eleventh edition contains a complete glossary of essential literary terms presented as a series of engaging, beautifully crafted essays that explore the terms, place them in context, and suggest related entries and additional reading. This indispensable, authoritative, and highly affordable reference covers terms useful in discussing literature and literary history, theory, and criticism. Perfect as a core text for introductory literary theory or as a supplement to any literature course, this classic work is an invaluable reference that students can continue to use throughout their academic and professional careers. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
Release

Magnalia Christi Americana

Or, The Ecclesiastical History of New-England, from Its First Planting, in the Year 1620, Unto the Year of Our Lord 1698 ...

Author: Cotton Mather,Thomas Robbins

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: New England

Page: N.A

View: 2033

Release

Hillbilly Nationalists, Urban Race Rebels, and Black Power

Community Organizing in Radical Times

Author: Amy Sonnie,James Tracy

Publisher: Melville House

ISBN: 1612190081

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 1166

THE STORY OF SOME OF THE MOST IMPORTANT AND LITTLE-KNOWN ACTIVISTS OF THE 1960s, IN A DEEPLY SOURCED NARRATIVE HISTORY The historians of the late 1960s have emphasized the work of a group of white college activists who courageously took to the streets to protest the war in Vietnam and continuing racial inequality. Poor and working-class whites have tended to be painted as spectators, reactionaries, and, even, racists. Most Americans, the story goes, just watched the political movements of the sixties go by. James Tracy and Amy Sonnie, who have been interviewing activists from the era for nearly ten years, reject this old narrative. They show that poor and working-class radicals, inspired by the Civil Rights movement, the Black Panthers, and progressive populism, started to organize significant political struggles against racism and inequality during the 1960s and 1970s. Among these groups: + JOIN Community Union brought together southern migrants, student radicals, and welfare recipients in Chicago to fight for housing, health, and welfare . . . + The Young Patriots Organization and Rising Up Angry organized self-identified hillbillies, Chicago greasers, Vietnam vets, and young feminists into a legendary “Rainbow Coalition” with Black and Puerto Rican activists . . . + In Philadelphia, the October 4th Organization united residents of industrial Kensington against big business, war, and a repressive police force . . . + In the Bronx, White Lightning occupied hospitals and built coalitions with doctors to fight for the rights of drug addicts and the poor. Exploring an untold history of the New Left, the book shows how these groups helped to redefine community organizing—and transforms the way we think about a pivotal moment in U.S. history. From the Trade Paperback edition.
Release

True Stories

A Century of Literary Journalism

Author: Norman Sims

Publisher: Northwestern University Press

ISBN: 0810124696

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 398

View: 400

Journalism in the twentieth century was marked by the rise of literary journalism. Sims traces more than a century of its history, examining the cultural connections, competing journalistic schools of thought, and innovative writers that have given literary journalism its power. Seminal exmples of the genre provide ample context and background for the study of this style of journalism.
Release

Journalism and Realism

Rendering American Life

Author: Thomas B. Connery

Publisher: Northwestern University Press

ISBN: 0810127334

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 281

View: 2121

"Both newspaper and magazine journalism in the nineteenth century fully participated in the development and emergence of American realism in the arts, which attempted to portray everyday life accurately, especially in fiction. In photographs and artists' sketches as well as news articles and features, journalists exposed the stories and conditions that became the material for American realism, and they were also its early and vocal advocates. This relationship peaked from 1890 to 1910, when writers who might be called the first literary journalists closed the circle by more fully adopting the fiction writer's style of attempting to 'show the reader real life, ' as their literary progeny Tom Wolfe would put it many years later."--Page 4 of cover.
Release

Post-Colonial Studies: The Key Concepts

Author: Bill Ashcroft,Gareth Griffiths,Helen Tiffin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134544219

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

View: 7252

First Published in 2000. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Release

Narrating the News

New Journalism and Literary Genre in Late Nineteenth-century American Newspapers and Fiction

Author: Karen Roggenkamp

Publisher: Kent State University Press

ISBN: 9780873388269

Category: History

Page: 199

View: 4494

Due to a burgeoning print marketplace during the late nineteenth century, urban newspapers felt pressure to create entertaining prose that appealed to readers, drawing on popular literary genres such as travel adventures, detective tales, and historical romances as a way of framing the news for readers. Using current events for their source documents, reporters fashioned their own dramas based on those that readers recognized from a broadly drawn literary culture. The desire to spin attractive, popular tales sometimes came at the expense of factual information. This novel, commercialized, and sensationalistic style of reporting, called "new journalism," was closely tied to American fiction. In "Narrating the News Karen Roggenkamp examines five major stories featured in three respected New York newspapers during the 1890s--"the story of two antebellum hoaxes, Nellie Bly's around-the-world journey, Lizzie Borden's sensational trial, Evangelina Cisneros's rescue from her Spanish captors, and the Janet Cooke "Jimmy's World" Scandal--"to illustrate how new journalism manipulated specific segments of the literary marketplace. These case studies are complemented by broader cultural analyses that touch on vital topics in literary and cultural studies--"gender, expansionism, realism, and professionalization. Unlike previously published studies of literature and journalism, which focus only on a few canonical figures, Roggenkamp looks at part of the history of mass print communications more generally, exposing the competitive and reinforcing interplay between specific literary genres and their journalistic revisions. "Narrating the News provides an original, significant contribution to the fieldsof literature, journalism history, and cultural studies.
Release

Lecture on the Times

Author: Ralph Waldo Emerson

Publisher: Library of Alexandria

ISBN: 1465613153

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 6597

The times, as we say — or the present aspects of our social state, theral Science, Agriculture, Art, Trade, Letters, have their root in an invisible spiritual reality. To appear in these aspects, they must first exist, or have some necessary foundation. Beside all the small reasons we assign, there is a great reason for the existence of every extant fact; a reason which lies grand and immovable, often unsuspected behind it in silence. The Times are the masquerade of the eternities; trivial to the dull, tokens of noble and majestic agents to the wise; the receptacle in which the Past leaves its history; the quarry out of which the genius of to-day is building up the Future. The Times — the nations, manners, institutions, opinions, votes, are to be studied as omens, as sacred leaves, whereon a weighty sense is inscribed, if we have the wit and the love to search it out. Nature itself seems to propound to us this topic, and to invite us to explore the meaning of the conspicuous facts of the day. Everything that is popular, it has been said, deserves the attention of the philosopher: and this for the obvious reason, that although it may not be of any worth in itself, yet it characterizes the people. Here is very good matter to be handled, if we are skilful; an abundance of important practical questions which it behoves us to understand. Let us examine the pretensions of the attacking and defending parties. Here is this great fact of Conservatism, entrenched in its immense redoubts, with Himmaleh for its front, and Atlas for its flank, and Andes for its rear, and the Atlantic and Pacific seas for its ditches and trenches, which has planted its crosses, and crescents, and stars and stripes, and various signs and badges of possession, over every rood of the planet, and says, `I will hold fast; and to whom I will, will I give; and whom I will, will I exclude and starve:’ so says Conservatism; and all the children of men attack the colossus in their youth, and all, or all but a few, bow before it when they are old. A necessity not yet commanded, a negative imposed on the will of man by his condition a deficiency in his force, is the foundation on which it rests. Let this side be fairly stated. Meantime, on the other part, arises Reform, and offers the sentiment of Love as an overmatch to this material might. I wish to consider well this affirmative side, which has a loftier port and reason than heretofore, which encroaches on the other every day, puts it out of countenance, out of reason, and out of temper, and leaves it nothing but silence and possession.
Release