Lincoln's Greatest Case: The River, the Bridge, and the Making of America

Author: Brian McGinty

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 087140785X

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 775

The untold story of how one sensational trial propelled a self-taught lawyer and a future president into the national spotlight. In May of 1856, the steamboat Effie Afton barreled into a pillar of the Rock Island Bridge, unalterably changing the course of American transportation history. Within a year, long-simmering tensions between powerful steamboat interests and burgeoning railroads exploded, and the nation’s attention, absorbed by the Dred Scott case, was riveted by a new civil trial. Dramatically reenacting the Effie Afton case—from its unlikely inception, complete with a young Abraham Lincoln’s soaring oratory, to the controversial finale—this “masterful” (Christian Science Monitor) account gives us the previously untold story of how one sensational trial propelled a self-taught lawyer and a future president into the national spotlight.
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Becoming Lincoln

Author: William W. Freehling

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 0813941571

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 8979

Shortlisted for the 2018 Lincoln Prize Previous biographies of Abraham Lincoln—universally acknowledged as one of America’s greatest presidents—have typically focused on his experiences in the White House. In Becoming Lincoln, renowned historian William Freehling instead emphasizes the prewar years, revealing how Lincoln came to be the extraordinary leader who would guide the nation through its most bitter chapter. Freehling’s engaging narrative focuses anew on Lincoln’s journey. The epic highlights Lincoln’s difficult family life, first with his father and later with his wife. We learn about the staggering number of setbacks and recoveries Lincoln experienced. We witness Lincoln’s famous embodiment of the self-made man (although he sought and received critical help from others). The book traces Lincoln from his tough childhood through incarnations as a bankrupt with few prospects, a superb lawyer, a canny two-party politician, a great orator, a failed state legislator, and a losing senatorial candidate, to a winning presidential contender and a besieged six weeks as a pre-war president. As Lincoln’s individual life unfolds, so does the American nineteenth century. Few great Americans have endured such pain but been rewarded with such success. Few lives have seen so much color and drama. Few mirror so uncannily the great themes of their own society. No one so well illustrates the emergence of our national economy and the causes of the Civil War. The book concludes with a substantial epilogue in which Freehling turns to Lincoln’s wartime presidency to assess how the preceding fifty-one years of experience shaped the Great Emancipator’s final four years. Extensively illustrated, nuanced but swiftly paced, and full of examples that vividly bring Lincoln to life for the modern reader, this new biography shows how an ordinary young man from the Midwest prepared to become, against almost absurd odds, our most tested and successful president.
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Lincoln's Last Trial: The Murder Case That Propelled Him to the Presidency

Author: Dan Abrams,David Fisher

Publisher: Harlequin

ISBN: 1488095329

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 2298

Instant New York Times bestseller! A Washington Independent Review of Books Favorite Book of 2018 A Suspense Magazine Best Book of 2018 A Mental Floss Best Book of 2018 A USA Today Top 10 Hot Book for Summer “Makes you feel as if you are watching a live camera riveted on a courtroom more than 150 years ago.” —Diane Sawyer The true story of Abraham Lincoln’s last murder trial, a case in which he had a deep personal involvement—and which played out in the nation’s newspapers as he began his presidential campaign At the end of the summer of 1859, twenty-two-year-old Peachy Quinn Harrison went on trial for murder in Springfield, Illinois. Abraham Lincoln, who had been involved in more than three thousand cases—including more than twenty-five murder trials—during his two-decades-long career, was hired to defend him. This was to be his last great case as a lawyer. What normally would have been a local case took on momentous meaning. Lincoln’s debates with Senator Stephen Douglas the previous fall had gained him a national following, transforming the little-known, self-taught lawyer into a respected politician. He was being urged to make a dark-horse run for the presidency in 1860. Taking this case involved great risk. His reputation was untarnished, but should he lose this trial, should Harrison be convicted of murder, the spotlight now focused so brightly on him might be dimmed. He had won his most recent murder trial with a daring and dramatic maneuver that had become a local legend, but another had ended with his client dangling from the end of a rope. The case posed painful personal challenges for Lincoln. The murder victim had trained for the law in his office, and Lincoln had been his friend and his mentor. His accused killer, the young man Lincoln would defend, was the son of a close friend and loyal supporter. And to win this trial he would have to form an unholy allegiance with a longtime enemy, a revivalist preacher he had twice run against for political office—and who had bitterly slandered Lincoln as an “infidel…too lacking in faith” to be elected. Lincoln’s Last Trial captures the presidential hopeful’s dramatic courtroom confrontations in vivid detail as he fights for his client—but also for his own blossoming political future. It is a moment in history that shines a light on our legal system, as in this case Lincoln fought a legal battle that remains incredibly relevant today.
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The Routledge Research Companion to Law and Humanities in Nineteenth-Century America

Author: Nan Goodman,Simon Stern

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1317042972

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 372

View: 5717

Nineteenth-century America witnessed some of the most important and fruitful areas of intersection between the law and humanities, as people began to realize that the law, formerly confined to courts and lawyers, might also find expression in a variety of ostensibly non-legal areas such as painting, poetry, fiction, and sculpture. Bringing together leading researchers from law schools and humanities departments, this Companion touches on regulatory, statutory, and common law in nineteenth-century America and encompasses judges, lawyers, legislators, litigants, and the institutions they inhabited (courts, firms, prisons). It will serve as a reference for specific information on a variety of law- and humanities-related topics as well as a guide to understanding how the two disciplines developed in tandem in the long nineteenth century.
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The Yankee Road

Tracing the Journey of the New England Tribe that Created Modern America, Vol. 2: Domination

Author: James D. McNiven

Publisher: Wheatmark, Inc.

ISBN: 1627875190

Category: Transportation

Page: 356

View: 3492

Who is a Yankee and where did the term come from? Join author Jim McNiven as he explores the emergence and influence of Yankee culture while traversing an old transcontinental highway reaching from the Atlantic to the Pacific—US 20, which he nicknames "The Yankee Road." The Yankee Road: Tracing the Journey of the New England Tribe that Created Modern America combines fascinating history with a travel narrative, taking the reader on a journey through the places Yankees and their descendants settled as they expanded westward. Using a physical road to connect locations important to the Yankee cultural "road," McNiven takes us on side trips into individual stories, introducing readers to the origins of such large-scale and diverse ideas as conservation, public education, telegraphy, mass production, religion, and labor reform. This second volume of a projected trilogy, Domination, centers on the growth of industry around the Great Lakes in the mid-nineteenth century into the twentieth century, something that led to the Yankee victory in the Civil War and the emergence of the reunited country as a major world power. Erastus Corning, Ida Tarbell, John Brown, JD Rockefeller, Henry Flagler, Thomas Edison, Henry Ford, the Kellogg brothers, the Wright brothers and Judge Gary, all make appearances.
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Johnson's New Universal Cyclopædia

A Scientific and Popular Treasury of Useful Knowledge

Author: Frederick Augustus Porter Barnard

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Encyclopedias and dictionaries

Page: N.A

View: 3731

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Encyclopedia of North American Railroads

Author: William D. Middleton,George M. Smerk,Roberta L. Diehl

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Reference

Page: 1281

View: 6538

A magnificent reference with the latest information on railroads past and present for anyone who was ever enthralled by the romance of the rails
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The Athenaeum

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 6746

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The Advocate

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 7721

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Lincoln Lore

Author: Louis Austin Warren

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: N.A

View: 1435

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The Official Railway Guide

North American Freight Service Edition

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Railroads

Page: N.A

View: 2995

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Engineering

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Engineering

Page: N.A

View: 6462

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Johnson's Univeral Cyclopædia

A Scientific and Popular Treasury of Useful Knowledge

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Encyclopedias and dictionaries

Page: N.A

View: 9757

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