Lincoln and the Court

Author: Brian McGinty

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674040821

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 3636

In a meticulously researched and engagingly written narrative, McGinty rescues the story of Abraham Lincoln and the Supreme Court from long and undeserved neglect, recounting the compelling history of the Civil War president's relations with the nation's highest tribunal and the role it played in resolving the agonizing issues raised by the conflict.
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The Lincoln Assassination Trial - The Court Transcripts

Author: William C. Edwards

Publisher: William Edwards

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 2909

This is a transcript of NARA M599 Reels 8-15. It contains the arguments and summaries as well as the full testimony of each witness. It also contains the testimony of the perjured witnesses. This along with "The Lincoln Assassination: The Evidence" and The Lincoln Assassination: The Reward Files" constitute a large majority of the primary evidence of the assassination.
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Lincoln and the common law

a collection of Lincoln's Illinois Supreme Court cases from 1838-1861 and their influence on the evolution of Illinois common law

Author: Dan W. Bannister,Illinois. Supreme Court

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Law

Page: 261

View: 2667

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Lincoln's Greatest Case: The River, the Bridge, and the Making of America

Author: Brian McGinty

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 087140785X

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 6967

The untold story of how one sensational trial propelled a self-taught lawyer and a future president into the national spotlight. In May of 1856, the steamboat Effie Afton barreled into a pillar of the Rock Island Bridge, unalterably changing the course of American transportation history. Within a year, long-simmering tensions between powerful steamboat interests and burgeoning railroads exploded, and the nation’s attention, absorbed by the Dred Scott case, was riveted by a new civil trial. Dramatically reenacting the Effie Afton case—from its unlikely inception, complete with a young Abraham Lincoln’s soaring oratory, to the controversial finale—this “masterful” (Christian Science Monitor) account gives us the previously untold story of how one sensational trial propelled a self-taught lawyer and a future president into the national spotlight.
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Lincoln's Supreme Court

Author: David Mayer Silver

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252067198

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 4177

More than four decades after its initial publication this book is still the only one to focus exclusively on President Abraham Lincoln's role in modifying the Supreme Court membership to secure the power he needed to save the Union.
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The Age of Lincoln and the Art of American Power, 1848-1876

Author: William Nester

Publisher: Potomac Books, Inc.

ISBN: 1612346596

Category: History

Page: 392

View: 2983

Although Abraham Lincoln was among seven presidents who served during the tumultuous years between the end of the Mexican War and the end of the Reconstruction era, history has not been kind to the others: Zachary Taylor, Millard Fillmore, Franklin Pierce, James Buchanan, Andrew Johnson, and Ulysses S. Grant. In contrast, history sees Abraham Lincoln as a giant in character and deeds. During his presidency, he governed brilliantly, developed the economy, liberated four million people from slavery, reunified the nation, and helped enact the Homestead Act, among other accomplishments. He proved to be not only an outstanding commander in chief but also a skilled diplomat, economist, humanist, educator, and moralist. Lincoln achieved that and more because he was a master of the art of American power. He understood that the struggle for hearts and minds was the essence of politics in a democracy. He asserted power mostly by appealing to peopleÆs hopes rather than their fears. All along he tried to shape rather than reflect prevailing public opinions that differed from his own. To that end, he was brilliant at bridging the gap between progressives and conservatives by reining in the former and urging on the latter. His art of power ultimately reflected his unswerving devotion to the Declaration of IndependenceÆs principles and the ConstitutionÆs institutions, or as he so elegantly expressed it, ôto a government of the people, by the people, and for the people.ö
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Courts and Congress

America's Unwritten Constitution

Author: William J. Quirk

Publisher: Transaction Publishers

ISBN: 1412813573

Category: Political Science

Page: 330

View: 2563

It's often said, confirmed by survey data, that the American people are losing confidence in their government. But the problem may be the reverse--the government has lost confidence in the people. Increasingly the power to make decisions in our democracy has been shifted from Congress to the court system, forcing non-elected officials to make decisions which affect the lives of Americans. In a society which is based on the democratic elections of its officials, this is clearly backwards. Quirk maintains that what he calls "The Happy Convention," an informal and unwritten rearrangement of "passing the buck" of government powers, is done to avoid blame and approval ratings becoming lower for a particular person or party. For example, The Happy Convention assigns the power to declare and make war to the President. Congress and the Court play a supporting role--Congress, when requested, gives the President a blank check to use force--the Court throws out any challenges to the legality of the war. Everyone wins if the war avoids disaster. If it turns out badly, the President is held accountable. His ratings fall, reelection is out of the question, congressmen say he lied to them; his Party is likely to lose the next election. In this way, Quirk reminds us that The Happy Convention is not what the Founders intended for us. For democracy to work properly, the American people have to know what options they have. Courts and Congress argues the case for reestablishing the balance of powers between the courts, the Congress, and the Presidency.
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Packing the Court

The Rise of Judicial Power and the Coming Crisis of the Supreme Court

Author: James Macgregor Burns

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101081902

Category: Political Science

Page: 336

View: 919

From renowned political theorist James MacGregor Burns, an incisive critique of the overreaching power of an ideological Supreme Court For decades, Pulitzer Prize-winner James MacGregor Burns has been one of the great masters of the study of power and leadership in America. In Packing the Court, he turns his eye to the U.S. Supreme Court, an institution that he believes has become more powerful, and more partisan, than the founding fathers ever intended. In a compelling and provocative narrative, Burns reveals how the Supreme Court has served as a reactionary force in American politics at critical moments throughout the nation's history, and concludes with a bold proposal to rein in the court's power.
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Laws of Kentucky

Comprehending Those of a General Nature Now in Force, and which Have Been Acted on by the Legislature Thereof : Together with a Copious Index and a List of Local Or Private Acts, with the Dates of the Sessions at which They Were Passed

Author: Kentucky

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Constitutions

Page: N.A

View: 4053

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Lincoln and the Jews

A History

Author: Jonathan D. Sarna,Benjamin Shapell

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 1466864613

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 2714

One hundred and fifty years after Abraham Lincoln's death, the full story of his extraordinary relationship with Jews is told here for the first time. Lincoln and the Jews: A History provides readers both with a captivating narrative of his interactions with Jews, and with the opportunity to immerse themselves in rare manuscripts and images, many from the Shapell Lincoln Collection, that show Lincoln in a way he has never been seen before. Lincoln's lifetime coincided with the emergence of Jews on the national scene in the United States. When he was born, in 1809, scarcely 3,000 Jews lived in the entire country. By the time of his assassination in 1865, large-scale immigration, principally from central Europe, had brought that number up to more than 150,000. Many Americans, including members of Lincoln's cabinet and many of his top generals during the Civil War, were alarmed by this development and treated Jews as second-class citizens and religious outsiders. Lincoln, this book shows, exhibited precisely the opposite tendency. He also expressed a uniquely deep knowledge of the Old Testament, employing its language and concepts in some of his most important writings. He befriended Jews from a young age, promoted Jewish equality, appointed numerous Jews to public office, had Jewish advisors and supporters starting already from the early 1850s, as well as later during his two presidential campaigns, and in response to Jewish sensitivities, even changed the way he thought and spoke about America. Through his actions and his rhetoric—replacing "Christian nation," for example, with "this nation under God"—he embraced Jews as insiders. In this groundbreaking work, the product of meticulous research, historian Jonathan D. Sarna and collector Benjamin Shapell reveal how Lincoln's remarkable relationship with American Jews impacted both his path to the presidency and his policy decisions as president. The volume uncovers a new and previously unknown feature of Abraham Lincoln's life, one that broadened him, and, as a result, broadened America.
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The Presidents and the Supreme Court

What Kind of Nation; Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney; FDR and Chief Justice Hughes

Author: James F. Simon

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1451671636

Category: History

Page: 1168

View: 7075

Collected together, James F. Simon’s books share the bitter struggles and compromises that have characterized the relationship between the presidents and the Supreme Court Chief Justices across US history. The bitter and protracted struggle between President Thomas Jefferson and Supreme Court Chief Justice John Marshall; the frustration and grudging admiration between FDR and Chief Justice Hughes; the clashes between President Abraham Lincoln and Chief Justice Roger B. Taney. These were the conflicts that ended slavery, that rescued us from the Great Depression, and that defined a nation—for better and for worse. And, Simon brings them to brilliant and compelling life.
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The Supreme Court and the Decline of Constitutional Aspiration

Author: Gary J. Jacobsohn

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780847676071

Category: Law

Page: 192

View: 7251

'An excellent commentary on and an insightful contribution to the current debate on constitutional interpretation.'-Walter F. Murphy, Princeton University
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Judging Lincoln

Author: Frank J. Williams

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN: 0809389258

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 232

View: 310

Judging Lincoln collects nine of the most insightful essays on the topic of the sixteenth president written by Frank J. Williams, chief justice of the Rhode Island Supreme Court and one of the nation’s leading authorities on Abraham Lincoln. For Judge Williams, Lincoln remains the central figure of the American experience—past, present, and future. Williams begins with a survey of the interest in—and influence of—Lincoln both at home and abroad and then moves into an analysis of Lincoln’s personal character with respect to his ability to foster relationships of equality among his intimates. Williams then addresses Lincoln’s leadership abilities during the span of his career, with particular emphasis on the Civil War. Next, he compares the qualities of Abraham Lincoln, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, and Winston Churchill. The final essay, cowritten with Mark E. Neely Jr., concerns collecting Lincoln artifacts as a means of preserving and fostering the Lincoln legacy.
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Up Against the Law

Affirmative Action and the Supreme Court

Author: Lincoln Caplan

Publisher: Twentieth Century Fund

ISBN: N.A

Category: Law

Page: 75

View: 9383

Caplan explores the evolution of affirmative action law by the Supreme Court and demonstrates how this evolution is fundamentally at odds with the way that affirmative action has developed throughout America.
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The Lincoln Myth

A Novel

Author: Steve Berry

Publisher: Ballantine Books

ISBN: 0345526597

Category: Fiction

Page: 448

View: 8236

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • A Cotton Malone adventure involving a flaw in the United States Constitution, a mystery about Abraham Lincoln, and a political issue that’s as explosive as it is timely—not only in Malone’s world, but in ours September 1861: All is not as it seems. With these cryptic words, a shocking secret passed down from president to president comes to rest in the hands of Abraham Lincoln. And as the first bloody clashes of the Civil War unfold, Lincoln alone must decide how best to use this volatile knowledge: save thousands of American lives, or keep the young nation from being torn apart forever? The present: In Utah, the fabled remains of Mormon pioneers whose nineteenth-century expedition across the desert met with a murderous end have been uncovered. In Washington, D.C., the official investigation of an international entrepreneur, an elder in the Mormon church, has sparked a political battle between the White House and a powerful United States senator. In Denmark, a Justice Department agent, missing in action, has fallen into the hands of a dangerous zealot—a man driven by divine visions to make a prophet’s words reality. And in a matter of a few short hours, Cotton Malone has gone from quietly selling books at his shop in Denmark to dodging bullets in a high-speed boat chase. All it takes is a phone call from his former boss in Washington, and suddenly the ex-agent is racing to rescue an informant carrying critical intelligence. It’s just the kind of perilous business that Malone has been trying to leave behind, ever since he retired from the Justice Department. But once he draws enemy blood, Malone is plunged into a deadly conflict—a constitutional war secretly set in motion more than two hundred years ago by America’s Founding Fathers. From the streets of Copenhagen to the catacombs of Salzburg to the rugged mountains of Utah, the grim specter of the Civil War looms as a dangerous conspiracy gathers power. Malone risks life, liberty, and his greatest love in a race for the truth about Abraham Lincoln—while the fate of the United States of America hangs in the balance. Praise for Steve Berry and his Cotton Malone series “In Malone, [Steve] Berry has created a classic, complex hero.”—USA Today “Malone, a hero with a personal stake in the proceedings, is a welcome respite from the cold, calculating superspies who litter the genre.”—Entertainment Weekly “Steve Berry gets better and better with each new book.”—The Huffington Post “Savvy readers . . . cannot go wrong with Cotton Malone.”—Library Journal “Berry raises this genre’s stakes.”—The New York Times “I love this guy.”—#1 New York Times bestselling author Lee Child From the Hardcover edition.
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The Henrician Reformation

The Diocese of Lincoln Under John Longland 1521-1547

Author: Margaret Bowker

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521236393

Category: History

Page: 229

View: 8712

The book will be invaluable reading for students of the social, ecclesiastical and political history of early modern England.
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A Court That Shaped America

Chicago's Federal District Court from Abe Lincoln to Abbie Hoffman

Author: Richard Cahan

Publisher: Northwestern University Press

ISBN: 0810119811

Category: History

Page: 271

View: 849

Introduces the busiest federal court in the nation, the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois, and examines its influence on the careers of such figures as Abraham Lincoln, Al Capone, and Abbie Hoffman.
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Journal of the Civil War Era

Summer 2013 Issue

Author: William A. Blair

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469608979

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 559

The Journal of the Civil War Era Volume 3, Number 2 June 2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS Editor's Note William Blair Articles Stephen Cushman When Lincoln Met Emerson Christopher Phillips Lincoln's Grasp of War: Hard War and the Politics of Neutrality and Slavery in the Western Border Slave States, 1861–1862 Jonathan W. White The Strangely Insignificant Role of the U.S. Supreme Court in the Civil War Review Essay Yael Sternhell Revisionism Reinvented? The Antiwar Turn in Civil War Scholarship Professional Notes Gary W. Gallagher The Civil War at the Sesquicentennial: How Well Do Americans Understand Their Great National Crisis? Book Reviews Books Received Notes on Contributors The Journal of the Civil War Era takes advantage of the flowering of research on the many issues raised by the sectional crisis, war, Reconstruction, and memory of the conflict, while bringing fresh understanding to the struggles that defined the period, and by extension, the course of American history in the nineteenth century.
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The Fate of Liberty

Abraham Lincoln and Civil Liberties

Author: Mark E. Neely Jr.

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199923485

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 6039

If Abraham Lincoln was known as the Great Emancipator, he was also the only president to suspend the writ of habeas corpus. Indeed, Lincoln's record on the Constitution and individual rights has fueled a century of debate, from charges that Democrats were singled out for harrassment to Gore Vidal's depiction of Lincoln as an "absolute dictator." Now, in the Pulitzer Prize-winning The Fate of Liberty, one of America's leading authorities on Lincoln wades straight into this controversy, showing just who was jailed and why, even as he explores the whole range of Lincoln's constitutional policies. Mark Neely depicts Lincoln's suspension of habeas corpus as a well-intentioned attempt to deal with a floodtide of unforeseen events: the threat to Washington as Maryland flirted with secession, disintegrating public order in the border states, corruption among military contractors, the occupation of hostile Confederate territory, contraband trade with the South, and the outcry against the first draft in U.S. history. Drawing on letters from prisoners, records of military courts and federal prisons, memoirs, and federal archives, he paints a vivid picture of how Lincoln responded to these problems, how his policies were actually executed, and the virulent political debates that followed. Lincoln emerges from this account with this legendary statesmanship intact--mindful of political realities and prone to temper the sentences of military courts, concerned not with persecuting his opponents but with prosecuting the war efficiently. In addition, Neely explores the abuses of power under the regime of martial law: the routine torture of suspected deserters, widespread antisemitism among Union generals and officials, the common practice of seizing civilian hostages. He finds that though the system of military justice was flawed, it suffered less from merciless zeal, or political partisanship, than from inefficiency and the friction and complexities of modern war. Informed by a deep understanding of a unique period in American history, this incisive book takes a comprehensive look at the issues of civil liberties during Lincoln's administration, placing them firmly in the political context of the time. Written with keen insight and an intimate grasp of the original sources, The Fate of Liberty offers a vivid picture of the crises and chaos of a nation at war with itself, changing our understanding of this president and his most controversial policies.
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