Knights Across the Atlantic

Author: Steven Parfitt

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 1781383189

Category:

Page: 288

View: 5610

The Noble and Holy Order of the Knights of Labor, the first national movement of the American working class, began in Philadelphia in 1869. Millions of Americans, white and black, men and women, became Knights between that date and 1917. But the Knights also spread beyond the borders of the United States and even beyond North America. Knights Across the Atlantic tells for the first time the full story of the Knights of Labor in Britain and Ireland, where they operated between 1883 and the end of the century. British and Irish Knights drew on the resources of their vast Order to establish a chain of branches through England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland that numbered more than 10,000 members at its peak. They drew on the fraternal ritual, industrial tactics, organisational models, and political concerns of their American Order and interpreted them in British and Irish conditions. They faced many of the same enemies, including hostile employers and rival trade unions. Unlike their American counterparts they organised only a handful of women at most. But British and Irish Knights left a profound imprint on subsequent British labour history. They helped inspire the British "New Unionists" of the 1890s. They influenced the movement for working-class politics, independent of Liberals and Conservatives alike, that soon led to the British Labour Party. Knights Across the Atlantic brings all these themes together. It provides new insights into relationships between class and gender, and places the Knights of Labor squarely at the heart of British and Irish as well as American history at the end of the nineteenth century.
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Holy Grail Across the Atlantic

The Secret History of Canadian Discovery and Exploration

Author: Michael Bradley,Deanna Theilmann-Bean

Publisher: Willowdale, Ont. : Hounslow Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 391

View: 3049

Some fascinating interpretations of early Canadian history that you may prefer to doubt
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The Knights Errant of Anarchy

London and the Italian Anarchist Diaspora (1880-1917)

Author: Pietro Di Paola

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 1846319692

Category: History

Page: 244

View: 8345

Late-Victorian London was home to many exiled anarchist groups who fled persecution in their home countries. In this book Pietro Di Paola looks at the lives of Italian anarchists, balancing an examination of their political organizations and activities with a study of their everyday lives as exiles and militants. Central to the book is an analysis of the processes by which the Italian anarchists created an international revolutionary network, what would be seen as an extremely dangerous threat by European and American governments. By investigating the political, social, and cultural aspects of this radical Italian group, The Knights Errant of Anarchy speaks to political radicalism within immigrant communities at large.
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Dark Night of the Soul

Author: Saint John of the Cross,Wyatt North

Publisher: Wyatt North Publishing, LLC

ISBN: 1622780132

Category: Religion

Page: 250

View: 4374

St. John of the Cross is widely considered one of the most prolific and important poets of his time. In fact, in Spanish poetry, the Spiritual Canticle and Dark Night of the Soul are two of the most important works of all time. He is known for his rich use of symbolism and imagery within his poetry. Dark Night of the Soul is the title of a poem written by 16th-century Spanish poet and Roman Catholic mystic Saint John of the Cross, as well as of a treatise he wrote later, commenting on the poem.
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Transnational Radicalism and the Connected Lives of Tom Mann and Robert Samuel Ross

Author: Neville Kirk

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 1786940094

Category: Socialism

Page: 304

View: 2733

This is an original study of the connected lives of two important socialists, Tom Mann (1856-1941) and Robert Samuel 'Bob' Ross (1873-1931). Born in Britain, Mann travelled the globe as a tireless socialist organiser and propagandist who met Ross in the course of his political work in Australia. They then worked closely together as labour editors, educators, trade unionists and socialists in Australia and New Zealand between 1902 and 1913. Thereafter, they continued regularly to correspond with one another and other socialists in Australia, New Zealand and other parts of the Pacific Rim. Based upon extensive research into neglected primary and secondary sources in Britain, Australia, New Zealand and related places, this book explores the careers and lives of Mann and Ross as paired transnational radicals, as leaders who crossed national and other boundaries in order to promote their socialism. It situates them within the neglected English-speaking and even global radical worlds of the later nineteenth- and early twentieth-centuries, a period that constituted an early phase of globalisation. Breaking new ground in moving beyond the national focus which has dominated much of the relevant history, this book highlights both the importance of Mann's and Ross's transnational endeavours, attachments and identities and the ways in which these interacted with their national, sub-national and international spheres of activity, striking a chord with a wide variety of radicals seeking change in today's globalised world.
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For Class and Country

The Patriotic Left and the First World War

Author: David Swift

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 1786948028

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 8058

The First World War has often suffered from comparison to the Second, in terms of both public interest and the significance ascribed to it by scholars in the shaping of modern Britain. This is especially so for the relationship between the Left and these two wars. For the Left, the Second World War can be seen as a time of triumph: a united stand against fascism followed by a landslide election win and a radical, reforming Labour government. The First World War is more complex. Given the gratuitous cost in lives, the failure of a 'fit country for heroes to live in' to materialise, the deep recessions and unemployment of the inter-war years, and the botched peace settlements which served only to precipitate another war, the Left has tended to view the conflict as an unmitigated disaster and unpardonable waste. This has led to a tendency on the Left to see the later conflict as the 'good' war, fought against an obvious evil, and the earlier conflict as an imperialist blunder; the result of backroom scheming, secret pacts and a thirst for colonies. This book hopes to move away from a concentration on machinations at the elite levels of the labour movement, on events inside Parliament and intellectual developments; there is a focus on less well-visited material.
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The French Anarchists in London, 1880-1914

Exile and Transnationalism in the First Globalisation

Author: Constance Bantman

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 1781386587

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 5935

This book is a study of political exile and transnational activism in the late-Victorian period. It explores the history of about 500 French-speaking anarchists who lived in exile in London between 1880 and 1914, with a close focus on the 1890s, when their presence peaked. These individuals sought to escape intense repression in France, at a time when anarchist-inspired terrorism swept over the Western world. Until the 1905 Aliens Act, Britain was the exception in maintaining a liberal approach to the containment of anarchism and terrorism; it was therefore the choice destination of international exiled anarchists, just as it had been for previous generations of revolutionary exiles throughout the nineteenth century. These French groups in London played a strategic role in the reinvention of anarchism at a time of crisis, but also triggered intense moral panic in France, Britain and beyond. This study retraces the lives of these largely unknown individuals - how they struggled to get by in the great late-Victorian metropolis, their social and political interactions among themselves, with other exiled groups and their host society. The myths surrounding their rumoured terrorist activities are examined, as well as the constant overt and covert surveillance which French and British intelligence services kept over them. The debates surrounding the controversial asylum granted to international anarchists, and especially the French, are presented, showing their role in the redefinition of British liberalism. The political legacy of these 'London years' is also analysed, since exile contributed to the formation of small but efficient transnational networks, which were pivotal to the development and international dissemination of syndicalism and, less successfully, to anti-war propaganda in the run up to 1914.
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Working the Diaspora

The Impact of African Labor on the Anglo-American World, 1650-1850

Author: Frederick C. Knight

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814763693

Category: History

Page: 252

View: 8472

From the sixteenth to early-nineteenth century, four times more Africans than Europeans crossed the Atlantic Ocean to the Americas. While this forced migration stripped slaves of their liberty, it failed to destroy many of their cultural practices, which came with Africans to the New World. In Working the Diaspora, Frederick Knight examines work cultures on both sides of the Atlantic, from West and West Central Africa to British North America and the Caribbean. Knight demonstrates that the knowledge that Africans carried across the Atlantic shaped Anglo-American agricultural development and made particularly important contributions to cotton, indigo, tobacco, and staple food cultivation. The book also compellingly argues that the work experience of slaves shaped their views of the natural world. Broad in scope, clearly written, and at the center of current scholarly debates, Working the Diaspora challenges readers to alter their conceptual frameworks about Africans by looking at them as workers who, through the course of the Atlantic slave trade and plantation labor, shaped the development of the Americas in significant ways.
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West with the Night

Author: Beryl Markham

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 1453237917

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 320

View: 457

The classic memoir of Africa, aviation, and adventure—the inspiration for Paula McLain’s Circling the Sun and “a bloody wonderful book” (Ernest Hemingway). Beryl Markham’s life story is a true epic. Not only did she set records and break barriers as a pilot, she shattered societal expectations, threw herself into torrid love affairs, survived desperate crash landings—and chronicled everything. A contemporary of Karen Blixen (better known as Isak Dinesen, the author of Out of Africa), Markham left an enduring memoir that soars with astounding candor and shimmering insights. A rebel from a young age, the British-born Markham was raised in Kenya’s unforgiving farmlands. She trained as a bush pilot at a time when most Africans had never seen a plane. In 1936, she accepted the ultimate challenge: to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean from east to west, a feat that fellow female aviator Amelia Earhart had completed in reverse just a few years before. Markham’s successes and her failures—and her deep, lifelong love of the “soul of Africa”—are all told here with wrenching honesty and agile wit. Hailed as “one of the greatest adventure books of all time” by Newsweek and “the sort of book that makes you think human beings can do anything” by the New York Times, West with the Night remains a powerful testament to one of the iconic lives of the twentieth century.
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The Winter of Discontent

Myth, Memory, and History

Author: Tara Martin López

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 1781386013

Category: History

Page: 252

View: 5227

In the midst of the freezing winter of 1978-79, more than 2,000 strikes, infamously coined the "Winter of Discontent", erupted across Britain as workers rejected the then Labour Government's attempts to curtail wage increases with an incomes policy. Labour's subsequent electoral defeat at the hands of the Conservative Party under the leadership of Margaret Thatcher ushered in an era of unprecedented political, economic, and social change for Britain. A potent social myth also quickly developed around the Winter of Discontent, one where "bloody-minded" and "greedy" workers brought down a sympathetic government and supposedly invited the ravages of Thatcherism upon the British labour movement. The Winter of Discontent provides a re-examination of this crucial series of events in British history by charting the construction of the myth of the Winter of Discontent. Highlighting key strikes and bringing forward the previously-ignored experiences of female, black, and Asian rank-and-file workers along-side local trade union leaders, the author places their experiences within a broader constellation of trade union, Labour Party, and Conservative Party changes in the 1970s, showing how striking workers' motivations become much more textured and complex than the "bloody-minded" or "greedy" labels imply. The author further illustrates that participants' memories represent a powerful force of "counter-memory", which for some participants, frame the Winter of Discontent as a positive and transformative series of events, especially for the growing number of female activists. Overall, this fascinating book illuminates the nuanced contours of myth, memory, and history of the Winter of Discontent.
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Between the World and Me

Author: Ta-Nehisi Coates

Publisher: Spiegel & Grau

ISBN: 0679645985

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 176

View: 5629

Hailed by Toni Morrison as “required reading,” a bold and personal literary exploration of America’s racial history by “the single best writer on the subject of race in the United States” (The New York Observer) #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER | NATIONAL BOOK AWARD WINNER | NAACP IMAGE AWARD WINNER | PULITZER PRIZE FINALIST | NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD FINALIST | NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The New York Times Book Review • O: The Oprah Magazine • The Washington Post • People • Entertainment Weekly • Vogue • Los Angeles Times • San Francisco Chronicle • Chicago Tribune • New York • Newsday • Library Journal • Publishers Weekly In a profound work that pivots from the biggest questions about American history and ideals to the most intimate concerns of a father for his son, Ta-Nehisi Coates offers a powerful new framework for understanding our nation’s history and current crisis. Americans have built an empire on the idea of “race,” a falsehood that damages us all but falls most heavily on the bodies of black women and men—bodies exploited through slavery and segregation, and, today, threatened, locked up, and murdered out of all proportion. What is it like to inhabit a black body and find a way to live within it? And how can we all honestly reckon with this fraught history and free ourselves from its burden? Between the World and Me is Ta-Nehisi Coates’s attempt to answer these questions in a letter to his adolescent son. Coates shares with his son—and readers—the story of his awakening to the truth about his place in the world through a series of revelatory experiences, from Howard University to Civil War battlefields, from the South Side of Chicago to Paris, from his childhood home to the living rooms of mothers whose children’s lives were taken as American plunder. Beautifully woven from personal narrative, reimagined history, and fresh, emotionally charged reportage, Between the World and Me clearly illuminates the past, bracingly confronts our present, and offers a transcendent vision for a way forward. Praise for Between the World and Me “Powerful . . . a searing meditation on what it means to be black in America today.”—Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times “Eloquent . . . in the tradition of James Baldwin with echoes of Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man . . . an autobiography of the black body in America.”—The Boston Globe “Brilliant . . . [Coates] is firing on all cylinders.”—The Washington Post “Urgent, lyrical, and devastating . . . a new classic of our time.”—Vogue “A crucial book during this moment of generational awakening.”—The New Yorker “Titanic and timely . . . essential reading.”—Entertainment Weekly
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Worker Voice

Employee Representation in the Workplace in Australia, Canada, Germany, the UK and the US 1914-1939

Author: Greg Patmore

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 1781384312

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 1074

This book informs debates about worker participation in the workplace or worker voice by analysing comparative historical data relating to these ideas during the inter-war period in Australia, Canada, Germany, the UK and the US. The issue is topical because of the contemporary shift to a workplace focus in many countries without a corresponding development of infrastructure at the workplace level, and because of the growing 'representation gap' as union membership declines. Some commentators have called for the introduction of works councils to address these issues. Other scholars have gone back and examined the experiences with the non-union Employee Representation Plans (ERPs) in Canada and the US. This book will test these claims through examining and comparing the historical record of previous efforts of five countries during a rich period of experimentation between the Wars. In addition to ERPs, the book expands the debate will by examining union-management co-operation, Whitley works committees and German works councils.
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The Stranger in the Woods

The Extraordinary Story of the Last True Hermit

Author: Michael Finkel

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 1101875690

Category: Nature

Page: 224

View: 1183

Many people dream of escaping modern life, but most will never act on it. This is the remarkable true story of a man who lived alone in the woods of Maine for 27 years, making this dream a reality—not out of anger at the world, but simply because he preferred to live on his own. A New York Times bestseller In 1986, a shy and intelligent twenty-year-old named Christopher Knight left his home in Massachusetts, drove to Maine, and disappeared into the forest. He would not have a conversation with another human being until nearly three decades later, when he was arrested for stealing food. Living in a tent even through brutal winters, he had survived by his wits and courage, developing ingenious ways to store edibles and water, and to avoid freezing to death. He broke into nearby cottages for food, clothing, reading material, and other provisions, taking only what he needed but terrifying a community never able to solve the mysterious burglaries. Based on extensive interviews with Knight himself, this is a vividly detailed account of his secluded life—why did he leave? what did he learn?—as well as the challenges he has faced since returning to the world. It is a gripping story of survival that asks fundamental questions about solitude, community, and what makes a good life, and a deeply moving portrait of a man who was determined to live his own way, and succeeded.
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Grail Knights of North America

On the Trail of the Grail Legacy in Canada and the United States

Author: Michael Anderson Bradley

Publisher: Dundurn

ISBN: 9780888822031

Category: True Crime

Page: 414

View: 3762

A decade ago, Michael Bradley published the Canadian bestseller, Holy Grail Across the Atlantic (Hounslow Press, 1988), presenting the astounding evidence that a European settlement in Canada had been established in Nova Scotia ninety-four years before Columbus and ninety-nine years before John Cabot. Incredibly, mediaeval documents and maps showed that this settlement had been founded by refugee Knights Templar from Scotland - knights who had been created for the sole purpose of guarding the Holy Grail. Bradley presented evidence that these Grail-believing religious refugees and their knightly protectors had been instrumental in discovering, settling, and influencing the development of New France and, later, the fledgling American Republic. The book was automatically ridiculed by conventional North American historians, while at the same time serving as the model for European works (e.g. The Sword and the Grail by Britain's Andrew Sinclair). Michael Bradley's investigation stimulated some serious professional and academic researchers to join his quest to find further evidence of the Knights Templar in Canada and the United States. Now, in 1998, comes the publication of the long-awaited sequel to Holy Grail Across the Atlantic - Grail Knights of North America. Realizing from mediaeval documents that the initial Nova Scotia refuge of AD 1398 must have harboured many Grail believers, and that the secret colony must have expanded, Bradley began to trace evidence of Grail Knights from Nova Scotia, through New Brunswick to the St. Lawrence River, and on to the Great Lakes as far as Niagara, New York State, and central Pennsylvania. Evidence of their presence has been uncovered on both the Canadian and American sides of this great waterway. Bradley poses compelling questions about his discoveries, and offers plausible and provocative answers as we travel with him and his companions (both academic and amateur) along the trail of the Grail Knights of North America.
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Working-Class Nationalism and Internationalism Until 1945

Essays in Global Labour History

Author: Steven Parfitt,Lorenzo Costaguta

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781527503588

Category: Internationalism

Page: 190

View: 3487

Nationalism and internationalism have always been powerful forces in the labour movements of the world. From the First to the Fourth International, from the International Labour Organization to the many international federations of trade unions, historians have studied both of these great forces for more than a hundred years. Interest in working-class nationalism and internationalism has also increased since the growth of global labour history, on the one hand, and the study of nationalism as a historically constructed phenomenon on the other. This volume is a part of this great upsurge in interest in working-class nationalism and internationalism. It brings together the work of postgraduate and postdoctoral scholars who have approached these two themes in their research. Covering subjects as diverse as the political instruction of Soviet sailors, the early and forgotten years of Chinese socialism, and debates within the socialist movement about Labour Zionism, this book represents an important contribution to labour, social and global history and helps us to understand the roads down which labour movements around the world have travelled to get where they are today.
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Migration and the Origins of the English Atlantic World

Author: Alison Games

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674573819

Category: History

Page: 322

View: 2922

England's seventeenth-century colonial empire in North America and the Caribbean was created by migration. The quickening pace of this essential migration is captured in the London port register of 1635, the largest extant port register for any single year in the colonial period and unique in its record of migration to America and to the European continent. Alison Games analyzes the 7,500 people who traveled from London in that year, recreating individual careers, exploring colonial societies at a time of emerging viability, and delineating a world sustained and defined by migration. The colonial travelers were bound for the major regions of English settlement--New England, the Chesapeake, the West Indies, and Bermuda--and included ministers, governors, soldiers, planters, merchants, and members of some major colonial dynasties--Winthrops, Saltonstalls, and Eliots. Many of these passengers were indentured servants. Games shows that however much they tried, the travelers from London were unable to recreate England in their overseas outposts. They dwelled in chaotic, precarious, and hybrid societies where New World exigencies overpowered the force of custom. Patterns of repeat and return migration cemented these inchoate colonial outposts into a larger Atlantic community. Together, the migrants' stories offer a new social history of the seventeenth century. For the origins and integration of the English Atlantic world, Games illustrates the primary importance of the first half of the seventeenth century.
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Harold Wilson, Denmark and the Making of Labour European Policy, 1958-72

Author: Matthew Broad

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 1786940485

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 304

View: 950

In 1958, Britain and Denmark both advocated closer European cooperation through the looser framework of the Free Trade Area (FTA) rather than membership of the nascent European Economic Community (EEC). By 1972, however, the situation had changed drastically. The FTA was a long-forgotten concept. Its replacement, the European Free Trade Association (EFTA), seemed economically and politically inept. Now, at the third time of asking, both countries were on the verge of joining the EEC as full members. This compelling analysis compares how the European policies of the British Labour Party and the Danish Social Democrats evolved amid this environment. Based on material from 12 archives in four countries, it updates our knowledge of key moments in both parties' interaction with the integration story, including in the formative stages of the EEC in 1958-60 and the negotiations for British and Danish EEC membership in 1961-63, 1967 and 1970-72. More innovatively, this book argues that amid an array of national and international constraints the reciprocal influence exerted by Labour and the SD on each other via informal party contacts was itself a crucial determinant in European policymaking. In so doing, it sheds light on the sources of Labour European thinking, the role of small states like Denmark in the integration process, and the prominence of the Anglo-Scandinavian nexus in the broader narrative of British foreign policy in this period.
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A Bridge Across the Ocean

Author: Susan Meissner

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 045147600X

Category: Fiction

Page: 384

View: 9113

Wartime intrigue spans the lives of three women--past and present--in this emotional novel from the acclaimed author of As Bright as Heaven. February, 1946. World War Two is over, but the recovery from the most intimate of its horrors has only just begun for Annaliese Lange, a German ballerina desperate to escape her past, and Simone Deveraux, the wronged daughter of a French Résistance spy. Now the two women are joining hundreds of other European war brides aboard the renowned RMS Queen Mary to cross the Atlantic and be reunited with their American husbands. Their new lives in the United States brightly beckon until their tightly-held secrets are laid bare in their shared stateroom. When the voyage ends at New York Harbor, only one of them will disembark... Present day. Facing a crossroads in her own life, Brette Caslake visits the famously haunted Queen Mary at the request of an old friend. What she finds will set her on a course to solve a seventy-year-old tragedy that will draw her into the heartaches and triumphs of the courageous war brides--and will ultimately lead her to reconsider what she has to sacrifice to achieve her own deepest longings. CONVERSATION GUIDE INCLUDED
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Soldiers as Workers

Author: Nick Mansfield

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 1781383847

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 7111

The book outlines how class is single most important factor in understanding the British army in the period of industrialisation. It challenges the 'ruffians officered by gentlemen' theory of most military histories and demonstrates how service in the ranks was not confined to 'the scum of the earth' but included a cross section of 'respectable' working class men. Common soldiers represent a huge unstudied occupational group. They worked as artisans, servants and dealers, displaying pre-enlistment working class attitudes and evidencing low level class conflict in numerous ways. Soldiers continued as members of the working class after discharge, with military service forming one phase of their careers and overall life experience. After training, most common soldiers had time on their hands and were allowed to work at a wide variety of jobs, analysed here for the first time. Many serving soldiers continued to work as regimental tradesmen, or skilled artificers. Others worked as officers' servants or were allowed to run small businesses, providing goods and services to their comrades. Some, especially the Non Commissioned Officers who actually ran the army, forged extraordinary careers which surpassed any opportunities in civilian life. All the soldiers studied retained much of their working class way of life. This was evidenced in a contract culture similar to that of the civilian trade unions. Within disciplined boundaries, army life resulted in all sorts of low level class conflict. The book explores these by covering drinking, desertion, feigned illness, self harm, strikes and go-slows. It further describes mutinies, back chat, looting, fraternisation, foreign service, suicide and even the shooting of unpopular officers.
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