Just the Facts

How "Objectivity" Came to Define American Journalism

Author: David T.Z. Mindich

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 081475614X

Category: History

Page: 200

View: 1771

In Critical Race Feminism, Anita Hill, Lani Guinier, Regina Austin, Patricia Williams, Emma Coleman Jordan (Anita Hill's lawyer) and over three dozen other women seek to ensure that their perspectives on race, power, law, and politics in America will never again be distorted or ignored. Revealing how the historical experiences and contemporary realities of women of color are profoundly influenced by a legacy of racism and sexism that is neither linear nor logical, the book offers a panoramic perspective on American women's lives, illustrating how women of color derive strength from oppression. Both a forceful statement and a platform, the volume addresses an ambitious range of subjects from life in the workplace, motherhood, and parenting to sexual harassment, the O.J. Simpson trial, and criminal justice. Extending beyond national borders, it also takes on such global issues as female genital mutilation with sensitivity and eloquence. In a foreword that discusses relations between black women and men in the wake of the Million Man March, Derrick Bell argues that there is a singular focus, and thus a unique power, in Critical Race Feminism that makes this anthology relevant for women and men of all colors.
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Just the Facts

How "Objectivity" Came to Define American Journalism

Author: David T.Z. Mindich

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814764150

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 200

View: 8193

If American journalism were a religion, as it has been called, then its supreme deity would be "objectivity." The high priests of the profession worship the concept, while the iconoclasts of advocacy journalism, new journalism, and cyberjournalism consider objectivity a golden calf. Meanwhile, a groundswell of tabloids and talk shows and the increasing infringement of market concerns make a renewed discussion of the validity, possibility, and aim of objectivity a crucial pursuit. Despite its position as the orbital sun of journalistic ethics, objectivity—until now—has had no historian. David T. Z. Mindich reaches back to the nineteenth century to recover the lost history and meaning of this central tenet of American journalism. His book draws on high profile cases, showing the degree to which journalism and its evolving commitment to objectivity altered–and in some cases limited—the public's understanding of events and issues. Mindich devotes each chapter to a particular component of this ethic–detachment, nonpartisanship, the inverted pyramid style, facticity, and balance. Through this combination of history and cultural criticism, Mindich provides a profound meditation on the structure, promise, and limits of objectivity in the age of cybermedia.
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Just the Facts

How "objectivity" Came to Define American Journalism

Author: David T.Z. Mindich

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814756131

Category: History

Page: 200

View: 8484

Describes how nineteenth-century American journalists established the goal of objectivity as the professional standard, even when adhering to it limited or distorted the information provided, and how objectivity failed when facing issues such as racism
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Politics and the American Press

The Rise of Objectivity, 1865-1920

Author: Richard L. Kaplan

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521006026

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 224

View: 9612

Politics and the American Press takes a fresh look at the origins of modern journalism's ideals and political practices. The book also provides fresh insights into the economics of journalism and documents the changes in political content of the press by a systematic content analysis of newspaper news and editorials over a span of 55 years. The book concludes by exploring the question of what should be the appropriate political role and professional ethics of journalists in a modern democracy.
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Tuned Out

Why Americans Under 40 Don't Follow the News

Author: David T. Z. Mindich

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0195161408

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 172

View: 4977

Drawing on interviews across the country with young professionals, college students, and even some preteens, the author of Just the Facts discovers that more young people are turning their backs on political news and explores the roots of the problem.
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Warp Speed

America in the Age of Mixed Media

Author: Bill Kovach,Tom Rosenstiel

Publisher: Twentieth Century Fund

ISBN: N.A

Category: Political Science

Page: 193

View: 4205

Did the coverage of the Clinton-Lewinsky scandal set a new low for American journalism? How has news gathering and reporting changed, and what effects has this had on the political and cultural landscape? In this insightful and thoughtful book, Bill Kovach and Tom Rosenstiel, two of America's leading press watchers, explore the new culture of news--what they call the new Mixed Media Culture--and show how it works.Warp Speed describes a world of news in which the speed of delivery is reducing the time for verification, sources are gaining more leverage over the news, and argument is overwhelming reporting. The press, forced to adhere to the demands of the bottom line and keep its audience, is straining more and more to find the Big Story to package as a form of entertainment, turning news stories into TV dramas; and turning history into a kind of Truman Show. As a result, the role of the press in a self-governing society is undermined.Grounded in extensive research, Warp Speed is informed by interviews and testimony from the principal journalists who covered this story and who covered the other great scandals of Washington politics. It offers detailed recommendations on how journalists can right their ship, such as using anonymous sources more responsibly and turning good journalism into good business.
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The Year That Defined American Journalism

1897 and the Clash of Paradigms

Author: W. Joseph Campbell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135205051

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 340

View: 6950

The Year that Defined American Journalism explores the succession of remarkable and decisive moments in American journalism during 1897 – a year of significant transition that helped redefine the profession and shape its modern contours. This defining year featured a momentous clash of paradigms pitting the activism of William Randolph Hearst's participatory 'journalism of action' against the detached, fact-based antithesis of activist journalism, as represented by Adolph Ochs of the New York Times, and an eccentric experiment in literary journalism pursued by Lincoln Steffens at the New York Commercial-Advertiser. Resolution of the three-sided clash of paradigms would take years and result ultimately in the ascendancy of the Times' counter-activist model, which remains the defining standard for mainstream American journalism. The Year That Defined American Journalism introduces the year-study methodology to mass communications research and enriches our understanding of a pivotal moment in media history.
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Doing Ethics in Journalism

A Handbook with Case Studies

Author: Jay Black,Bob Steele,Ralph D. Barney

Publisher: Prentice Hall

ISBN: N.A

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 310

View: 8623

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Capturing the News

Three Decades of Reporting Crisis and Conflict

Author: Anthony Collings

Publisher: University of Missouri Press

ISBN: 0826272118

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 200

View: 6658

Anthony Collings found himself in his share of difficult situations in his thirty-four years as a newsman. Like being captured by AK-47–toting Syrians in Lebanon in 1981 while looking for missiles that threatened a new outbreak of hostilities with Israel, or being “detained” by the KGB in Moscow in 1967 during his first foreign posting for the Associated Press filing stories about Soviet dissidents. Name a hot spot, and Collings has likely been there. From AP correspondent to Newsweek bureau chief to CNN reporter, he covered the Middle East, Rome, Moscow, London, Paris, and Washington. Now he has gathered stories about his work in a book that is both a journalist’s memoir and a commentary on the current ethical crises in the news media and how to address them. Brimming with entertaining stories about journalism, especially the chaotic early years at CNN when he and his colleagues established the first major cable news network, Collings’s book reveals the dangers and pressures of covering the news and the difficulties of overcoming obstacles to the truth. He recalls smuggling tapes out of Poland after the Communists had imposed martial law; flying dangerously near Libya’s “Line of Death”; interviewing world figures from Brezhnev to Kaddafi and Arafat; and winning awards for covering Iran-Contra and the Oklahoma City bombing. Collings brings fresh insights to the Oliver North affair and examines how the press was suckered in its coverage of the Jessica Lynch prisoner-of-war story in 2003. He voices his concerns regarding oversimplified reporting of complex issues and poses provocative questions about covering terrorism. In this book, Collings presents an insider’s appraisal of the American news media’s failings and accomplishments. Easy to read, informative, and thoughtful, Capturing the News will enlighten general readers interested in how journalists cover current affairs, while offering newsmen food for thought about the craft and ethics of journalism.
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The Elements of Journalism

What Newspeople Should Know and the Public Should Expect

Author: Bill Kovach,Tom Rosenstiel

Publisher: Three Rivers Press (CA)

ISBN: 0804136785

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 332

View: 5094

The authors outline the main principles of journalism, discussing the ethical and professional issues affecting the work of newspeople, the forces shaping the profession, and the future of journalism. 50,000 first printing.
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On Press

The Liberal Values That Shaped the News

Author: Matthew Pressman

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674916166

Category: History

Page: 310

View: 7815

As Matthew Pressman’s timely history reveals, during the turbulent 1960s and 70s the core values that held the news industry together broke apart and the distinctive characteristics of contemporary American print journalism emerged. Simply reporting the facts was no longer enough as reporters recognized a need to interpret events for their readers.
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We the Media

Grassroots Journalism By the People, For the People

Author: Dan Gillmor

Publisher: "O'Reilly Media, Inc."

ISBN: 0596102275

Category: Computers

Page: 301

View: 8225

Not content to accept the news as reported, grassroots journalists are publishing in real time to a worldwide audience via the Internet. The impact of their work is just beginning to be felt by professional journalists and the newsmakers they cover. Dan Gillmor tells the story of this phenomenon.
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Enrique's Journey

The True Story of a Boy Determined to Reunite with His Mother

Author: Sonia Nazario

Publisher: Ember

ISBN: 0385743289

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 273

View: 7804

Documents the journey of a Honduran teen who braved hardship and peril to reunite with his mother after she was forced to leave him behind and seek migratory work in the United States.
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About to Die

How News Images Move the Public

Author: Barbie Zelizer

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199780811

Category: Photography

Page: 432

View: 4449

Due to its ability to freeze a moment in time, the photo is a uniquely powerful device for ordering and understanding the world. But when an image depicts complex, ambiguous, or controversial events--terrorist attacks, wars, political assassinations--its ability to influence perception can prove deeply unsettling. Are we really seeing the world "as it is" or is the image a fabrication or projection? How do a photo's content and form shape a viewer's impressions? What do such images contribute to historical memory? About to Die focuses on one emotionally charged category of news photograph--depictions of individuals who are facing imminent death--as a prism for addressing such vital questions. Tracking events as wide-ranging as the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake, the Holocaust, the Vietnam War, and 9/11, Barbie Zelizer demonstrates that modes of journalistic depiction and the power of the image are immense cultural forces that are still far from understood. Through a survey of a century of photojournalism, including close analysis of over sixty photos, About to Die provides a framework and vocabulary for understanding the news imagery that so profoundly shapes our view of the world.
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Objectivity in Journalism

Author: Steven Maras

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0745663923

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 248

View: 5616

Objectivity in journalism is a key topic for debate in media, communication and journalism studies, and has been the subject of intensive historical and sociological research. In the first study of its kind, Steven Maras surveys the different viewpoints and perspectives on objectivity. Going beyond a denunciation or defence of journalistic objectivity, Maras critically examines the different scholarly and professional arguments made in the area. Structured around key questions, the book considers the origins and history of objectivity, its philosophical influences, the main objections and defences, and questions of values, politics and ethics. This book examines debates around objectivity as a transnational norm, focusing on the emergence of objectivity in the US, while broadening out discussion to include developments around objectivity in the UK, Australia, Asia and other regions.
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The Influencing Machine: Brooke Gladstone on the Media

Author: Brooke Gladstone,Josh Neufeld

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393077799

Category: Social Science

Page: 170

View: 2148

The cohost of NPR's On the Media narrates, in cartoon form, two millennia of the influence of the media on the populace, from newspapers in Caesar's Rome to the penny press of the American Revolution to today. 30,000 first printing.
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The United States of Wal-Mart

Author: John Dicker

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101143444

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 6037

An irreverent, hard-hitting examination of the world's largest-and most reviled-corporation, which reveals that while Wal-Mart's dominance may be providing consumers with cheap goods and plentiful jobs, it may also be breeding a culture of discontent. It employs one of every 115 American workers. If it were a nation-state, it would be one of the world's top twenty economies. With yearly sales of nearly $260 billion and an average way of $8 an hour, Wal-Mart represents an unprecedented-and perhaps unstoppable-force in capitalism. And there have been few corporations that have evoked the same levels of reverence and ire. The United States of Wal-Mart is a hard-hitting examination of how Sam Walton's empire has infiltrated not just the geography of America but also its consciousness. Peeling away layers of propaganda and politics, investigative journalist John Dicker reveals an American (and, increasingly, a global) story that has no clear-cut villains or heroes-one that could be the confused, complicated story of America itself. Pitched battles between economic progress and quality of life, between the preservation of regional identity and national homogeneity, and between low prices and the dignity of the American worker are beginning to coalesce into an all-out war to define our modern era. And, Dicker argues, Wal-Mart is winning. Revealing that the company's business practices have been shaping American culture, including the nation's social, political, and industrial policy, The United States of Wal-Mart provides fresh insight into a controversy that isn't going away.
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Four Percent

The Story of Uncommon Youth in a Century of American Life

Author: Michael Shawn Malone

Publisher: LandMarc Press

ISBN: 9780985909710

Category: Eagle Scouts

Page: 256

View: 860

"Focus on the remarkable story of Eagle Scouts. Award-winning author Michael S. Malone, himself an Eagle, brings the eye of a veteran journalist to a story that for too long has been wrapped in myth and prejudice and uncovers one of the most important, but least celebrated, movements in modern American history". -- Back cover.
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Founding Faith

Providence, Politics, and the Birth of Religious Freedom in America

Author: Steven Waldman

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 158836674X

Category: Religion

Page: 304

View: 8762

The culture wars have distorted the dramatic story of how Americans came to worship freely. Many activists on the right maintain that the United States was founded as a “Christian nation.” Many on the left contend that the Founders were secular or Deist and that the First Amendment was designed to boldly separate church and state throughout the land. None of these claims are true, argues Beliefnet.com editor in chief Steven Waldman. With refreshing objectivity, Waldman narrates the real story of how our nation’s Founders forged a new approach to religious liberty, a revolutionary formula that promoted faith . . . by leaving it alone. This fast-paced narrative begins with earlier settlers’ stunningly unsuccessful efforts to create a Christian paradise, and concludes with the presidencies of Washington, Adams, Jefferson, and Madison, during which the men who had devised lofty principles regarding the proper relationship between church and state struggled to practice what they’d preached. We see how religion helped cause, and fuel, the Revolutionary War, and how the surprising alliance between Enlightenment philosophers such as Jefferson and Madison and evangelical Christians resulted in separation of church and state. As the drama unfolds, Founding Faith vividly describes the religious development of five Founders. Benjamin Franklin melded the morality-focused Puritan theology of his youth and the reason-based Enlightenment philosophy of his adulthood. John Adams’s pungent views on religion–hatred of the Church of England and Roman Catholics–stoked his revolutionary fervor and shaped his political strategy. George Washington came to view religious tolerance as a military necessity. Thomas Jefferson pursued a dramatic quest to “rescue” Jesus, in part by editing the Bible. Finally, it was James Madison–the tactical leader of the battle for religious freedom–who crafted an integrated vision of how to prevent tyranny while encouraging religious vibrancy. The spiritual custody battle over the Founding Fathers and the role of religion in America continues today. Waldman provocatively argues that neither side in the culture war has accurately depicted the true origins of the First Amendment. He sets the record straight, revealing the real history of religious freedom to be dramatic, unexpected, paradoxical, and inspiring. An interactive library of the key writings by the Founding Father, on separation of church and state, personal faith, and religious liberty can be found at www.beliefnet.com/foundingfaith.
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Evicted

Poverty and Profit in the American City

Author: Matthew Desmond

Publisher: Crown

ISBN: 0553447432

Category: POLITICAL SCIENCE

Page: 418

View: 3396

A Harvard sociologist examines the challenge of eviction as a formidable cause of poverty in America, revealing how millions of people are wrongly forced from their homes and reduced to cycles of extreme disadvantage that are reinforced by dysfunctional legal systems. Set in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
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