Journalism and the Periodical Press in Nineteenth-Century Britain

Author: Joanne Shattock

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 110708573X

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 448

View: 385

Newly commissioned essays by leading scholars offer a comprehensive and authoritative overview of the diversity, range and impact of the newspaper and periodical press in nineteenth-century Britain. Essays range from studies of periodical formats in the nineteenth century - reviews, magazines and newspapers - to accounts of individual journalists, many of them eminent writers of the day. The uneasy relationship between the new 'profession' of journalism and the evolving profession of authorship is investigated, as is the impact of technological innovations, such as the telegraph, the typewriter and new processes of illustration. Contributors go on to consider the transnational and global dimensions of the British press and its impact in the rest of the world. As digitisation of historical media opens up new avenues of research, the collection reveals the centrality of the press to our understanding of the nineteenth century.
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Perceptions of the Press in Nineteenth-Century British Periodicals

A Bibliography

Author: E. M. Palmegiano

Publisher: Anthem Press

ISBN: 1783080531

Category: Reference

Page: 712

View: 9202

This annotated bibliography of nineteenth-century British periodicals, complete with a detailed subject index, reveals how Victorian commentaries on journalism shaped the discourse on the origins and contemporary character of the domestic, imperial and foreign press. Drawn from a wide range of publications representing diverse political, economic, religious, social and literary views, this book contains over 4,500 entries, and features extracts from over forty nineteenth-century periodicals. The articles cataloged offer a thorough and influential analysis of their journalistic milieu, presenting statistics on sales and descriptions of advertising, passing judgment on space allocations, pinpointing different readerships, and identifying individuals who engaged with the press either exclusively or occasionally. Most importantly, the bibliography demonstrates that columnists routinely articulated ideas about the purpose of the press, yet rarely recognized the illogic of prioritizing public good and private profit simultaneously, thus highlighting implicitly a universal characteristic of journalism: its fractious, ambiguous, conflicting behavior.
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Science Serialized

Representations of the Sciences in Nineteenth-Century Periodicals

Author: Geoffrey Cantor,Sally Shuttleworth

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 9780262262187

Category: Science

Page: 376

View: 8987

Essays examining the ways in which the Victorian periodical press presented the scientific developments of the time to general and specialized audiences. Nineteenth-century Britain saw an explosion of periodical literature, with the publication of over 100,000 different magazines and newspapers for a growing market of eager readers. The Victorian periodical press became an important medium for the dissemination of scientific ideas. Every major scientific advance in the nineteenth century was trumpeted and analyzed in periodicals ranging from intellectual quarterlies such as the Edinburgh Review to popular weeklies like the Mirror of Literature, from religious periodicals such as the Evangelical Magazine to the atheistic Oracle of Reason. Scientific articles appeared side by side with the latest fiction or political reporting, while articles on nonscientific topics and serialized novels invoked scientific theories or used analogies drawn from science.The essays collected in Science Serialized examine the variety of ways in which the nineteenth-century periodical press represented science to both general and specialized readerships. They explore the role of scientific controversy in the press and the cultural politics of publication. Subject range from the presentation of botany in women's magazines to the highly public dispute between Darwin and Samuel Butler, and from discussions of the mind-body problem to those of energy physics. Contributors include leading scholars in the fields of history of science and literature: Ann B. Shteir, Jonathan Topham, Frank A. J. L. James, Roger Smith, Graeme Gooday, Crosbie Smith, Ian Higginson, Gillian Beer, Bernard Lightman, Helen Small, Gowan Dawson, Jonathan Smith, James G. Paradis, and Harriet Ritvo
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The Religious Press in Britain, 1760-1900

Author: Josef Lewis Altholz

Publisher: Praeger Pub Text

ISBN: N.A

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 215

View: 6366

In this first systematic and comprehensive treatment of 19th century British religious journalism, the more important or representative periodicals are identified and assigned to their appropriate denominations and movements. The periodical press was the preeminent medium of communication on all subjects in the 19th century and is the primary source for the study of religion. This book provides a general history of the religious press and a reference tool for those who wish to use periodcals to understand the importance of religion in Victorian society.
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Culture and Science in the Nineteenth-Century Media

Author: Louise Henson,Geoffrey Cantor,Gowan Dawson,Richard Noakes,Sally Shuttleworth,Jonathan R. Topham

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351946846

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 328

View: 6584

Written by literary scholars, historians of science, and cultural historians, the twenty-two original essays in this collection explore the intriguing and multifaceted interrelationships between science and culture through the periodical press in nineteenth-century Britain. Ranging across the spectrum of periodical titles, the six sections comprise: 'Women, Children, and Gender', 'Religious Audiences', 'Naturalizing the Supernatural', 'Contesting New Technologies', 'Professionalization and Journalism', and 'Evolution, Psychology, and Culture'. The essays offer some of the first 'samplings and soundings' from the emergent and richly interdisciplinary field of scholarship on the relations between science and the nineteenth-century media.
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Dickens, Journalism, and Nationhood

Mapping the World in Household Words

Author: Sabine Clemm

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135904065

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 260

View: 4102

Dickens, Journalism, and Nationhood examines Charles Dickens’ weekly family magazine Household Words in order to develop a detailed picture of how the journal negotiated, asserted and simultaneously deconstructed Englishness as a unified (and sometimes unifying) mode of expression. It offers close readings of a wide range of materials that self-consciously focus on the nature of England as well as the relationship between Britain and the European continent, Ireland, and the British colonies. Starting with the representation and classification of identities that took place within the framework of the Great Exhibition of 1851, it suggests that the journal strives for a model of the world in concentric circles, spiraling outward from the metropolitan center of London. Despite this apparent orderliness, however, each of the national or regional categories constructed by the journal also resists and undermines such a clear-cut representation.
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Women of the Press in Nineteenth-Century Britain

Author: B. Onslow

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 9780333683781

Category: Fiction

Page: 312

View: 8523

To nineteenth century writers the dynamic periodical press appeared both an influential medium and a means to pay the bills. How did women fare in Grub Street? Could they harness the power of the press? Who were the 'lady journalists'? Drawing on varied contemporary sources and a database covering hundreds of women, Barbara Onslow assesses their contribution to journalism and how it affected the careers of writers as diverse as George Eliot, Anna Maria Hall, Mary Braddon and Charlotte Yonge.
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Women and Literature in Britain 1800-1900

Author: Joanne Shattock

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521659574

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 311

View: 9549

These new essays by leading scholars explore nineteenth-century women's writing across a spectrum of genres. The book's focus is on women's role in and access to literary culture in the broadest sense, as consumers and interpreters as well as practitioners of that culture. Individual chapters consider women as journalists, editors, translators, scholars, actresses, playwrights, autobiographers, biographers, writers for children and religious writers as well as novelists and poets. A unique chronology offers a woman-centered perspective on literary and historical events and there is a guide to further reading.
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Subjugated Knowledges

Journalism, Gender, and Literature in the 19Th Century

Author: Laurel Brake

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814712185

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 228

View: 3493

Subjugated Knowledges examines the relation of print and culture in the nineteenth century and establishes a high level of interdependence between literature, journalism and gender. Laurel Brake scrutinizes the cultural politics and production of specific Victorian magazines and explores ways in which authorship is constructed in various forms of biography and periodical space is gendered. The book is divided into three sections - on literature and journalism, gendered space, and biography and authorship - in which the professionalization of critics and journals, women's magazines and the Savoy, and a wide range of authors, editors, journalists, publishers and journals are examined. A fascinating introductory chapter on 'Criticism and the Victorian Periodical Press' maps the territory. Subjugated Knowledges is an absorbing account of the cultural formations of Victorian journalism. It will be of interest to all students of Victorian literature and history, and of media, cultural and gender studies.
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Researching the Nineteenth-Century Periodical Press

Case Studies

Author: Alexis Easley,Andrew King,John Morton

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1317065506

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 220

View: 6967

Extending the work of The Routledge Handbook to Nineteenth-Century British Periodicals and Newspapers, this volume provides a critical introduction and case studies that illustrate cutting-edge approaches to periodicals research, as well as an overview of recent developments in the field. The twelve chapters model diverse approaches and methodologies for research on nineteenth-century periodicals. Each case study is contextualized within one of the following broad areas of research: single periodicals, individual journalists, gender issues, periodical networks, genre, the relationship between periodicals, transnational/transatlantic connections, technologies of printing and illustration, links within a single periodical, topical subjects, science and periodicals, and imperialism and periodicals. Contributors incorporate first-person accounts of how they conducted their research and provide specific examples of how they gained access to primary sources, as well as the methods they used to analyze the materials.
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Literature, Journalism, and the Vocabularies of Liberalism

Politics and Letters, 1886-1916

Author: J. Macleod

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230391478

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 239

View: 2874

This book examines the impact of the new liberalism on English literary discourse from the fin-de-siècle to World War One. It maps out an extensive network of journalists, men of letters and political theorists, showing how their shared political and literary vocabularies offer new readings of liberalism's relation to an emerging modernist culture.
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Ireland and the New Journalism

Author: K. Steele,M. de Nie,Michael de Nie

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137428716

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 235

View: 7577

This volume explores the ways in which the complicated revolution in British newspapers, the New Journalism, influenced Irish politics, culture, and newspaper practices. The essays here further illuminate the central role of the press in the evolution of Irish nationalism and modernism in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
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Visions of the Press in Britain, 1850-1950

Author: Mark Hampton

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252029462

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 218

View: 1690

"Mark Hampton surveys a diversity of sources - parliamentary speeches and commissions, books, pamphlets, periodicals and select private correspondence - in order to identify how governmental elites, the educated public, professional journalists, and industry moguls characterized the political and cultural function of the press."--Jacket.
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The Nineteenth-Century Press in the Digital Age

Author: J. Mussell

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230365469

Category: History

Page: 250

View: 8243

James Mussell provides an accessible account of the digitization of nineteenth-century newspapers and periodicals. As studying this material is essential to understand the period, he argues that we have no choice but to engage with the new digital resources that have transformed how we access the print archive.
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Gender and the Victorian Periodical

Author: Hilary Fraser,Judith Johnston,Stephanie Green

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521830720

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 255

View: 3441

Examines the role of the Victorian periodical in defining and refining ideas of gender.
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Women in Journalism at the Fin de Siècle

Making a Name for Herself

Author: F. Gray

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137001305

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 271

View: 3385

As the nineteenth-century drew to a close, women became more numerous and prominent in British journalism. This book offers a fascinating introduction to the work lives of twelve such journalists, and each essay examines the career, writing and strategic choices of women battling against the odds to secure recognition in a male-dominated society.
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Love and Eugenics in the Late Nineteenth Century

Rational Reproduction and the New Woman

Author: Angelique Richardson

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780198187004

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 250

View: 7450

The idea of eugenics - human selective breeding - originated in Victorian Britain in response to the problem of the urban poor. It was championed by New Woman writers, who sought to restore the health of the nation, arguing that through rational reproduction middle-class women could regenerate the British imperial race. Exploring the pervasiveness of eugenic ideas in fin-de-siècle Britain, and recontextualizing New Woman fiction, Love and Eugenics in the Late Nineteenth Century makes a radical contribution to nineteenth-century studies, establishing the intimate relations between early feminism and eugenics.
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Music and Performance Culture in Nineteenth-Century Britain

Essays in Honour of Nicholas Temperley

Author: Professor Bennett Zon

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1409495531

Category: Music

Page: 364

View: 7358

Music and Performance Culture in Nineteenth-Century Britain: Essays in Honour of Nicholas Temperley is the first book to focus upon aspects of performance in the broader context of nineteenth-century British musical culture. In four Parts, 'Musical Cultures', 'Societies', 'National Music' and 'Methods', this volume assesses the role music performance plays in articulating significant trends and currents of the cultural life of the period and includes articles on performance and individual instruments; orchestral and choral ensembles; church and synagogue music; music societies; cantatas; vocal albums; the middle-class salon, conducting; church music; and piano pedagogy. An introduction explores Temperley's vast contribution to musicology, highlighting his seminal importance in creating the field of nineteenth-century British music studies, and a bibliography provides an up-to-date list of his publications, including books and monographs, book chapters, journal articles, editions, reviews, critical editions, arrangements and compositions. Fittingly devoted to a significant element in Temperley's research, this book provides scholars of all nineteenth-century musical topics the opportunity to explore the richness of Britain's musical history.
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G.W.M. Reynolds

Nineteenth-Century Fiction, Politics, and the Press

Author: Anne Humpherys

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351935089

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 314

View: 3643

G.W.M. Reynolds (1814-1879) had a major impact on the mid-Victorian era that until now has been largely unacknowledged. A prolific novelist whose work had a massive circulation, and an influential journalist and editor, he was a man of contradictions in both his life and writing: a middle-class figure who devoted his life to working class issues but seldom missed a chance to profit from the exploitation of current issues; the founder of the radical newspaper Reynolds Weekly, as well as a bestselling author of historical romances, gothic and sensation novels, oriental tales, and domestic fiction; a perennial bankrupt who nevertheless ended his life prosperously. A figure of such diversity requires a collaborative study. Bringing together a distinguished group of scholars, this volume does justice to the full range of Reynolds's achievement and influence. With proper emphasis on new work in the field, the contributors take on Reynolds's involvement with Chartism, serial publication, the mass market periodical, commodity culture, and the introduction of French literature into British consciousness, to name just a few of the topics covered. The Mysteries of London, the century's most widely read serial, receives the extensive treatment this long-running urban gothic work deserves. Adding to the volume's usefulness are comprehensive bibliographies of Reynolds's own writings and secondary criticism relevant to the study of this central figure in mid-nineteenth-century Britain.
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