Jews in the Gym

Judaism, Sports, and Athletics

Author: Leonard Jay Greenspoon

Publisher: Purdue University Press

ISBN: 1557536295

Category: History

Page: 289

View: 1094

For some, the connection between Jews and athletics might seem far-fetched. But in fact, as is highlighted by the fourteen chapters in this collection, Jews have been participating in -- and thinking about -- sports for more than two thousand years. The articles in this volume scan a wide chronological range: from the Hellenistic period (first century BCE) to the most recent basketball season. The range of athletes covered is equally broad: from participants in Roman-style games to wrestlers, boxers, fencers, baseball players, and basketball stars. The authors of these essays, many of whom actively participate in athletics themselves, raise a number of intriguing questions, such as: What differing attitudes toward sports have Jews exhibited across periods and cultures? Is it possible to be a "good Jew" and a "great athlete"? In what sports have Jews excelled, and why? How have Jews overcome prejudices on the part of the general populace against a Jewish presence on the field or in the ring? In what ways has Jewish participation in sports aided, or failed to aid, the perception of Jews as "good Germans," "good Hungarians," "good Americans," and so forth? This volume, which features a number of illustrations (many of them quite rare), is not only accessible to the general reader, but also contains much information of interest to the scholar in Jewish studies, American studies, and sports history.
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The Routledge Handbook of Contemporary Jewish Cultures

Author: Nadia Valman,Laurence Roth

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135048541

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 414

View: 1132

The Routledge Handbook to Contemporary Jewish Cultures explores the diversity of Jewish cultures and ways of investigating them, presenting the different methodologies, arguments and challenges within the discipline. Divided into themed sections, this book considers in turn: How the individual terms "Jewish" and "culture" are defined, looking at perspectives from Anthropology, Music, Literary Studies, Sociology, Religious Studies, History, Art History, and Film, Television, and New Media Studies. How Jewish cultures are theorized, looking at key themes regarding power, textuality, religion/secularity, memory, bodies, space and place, and networks. Case studies in contemporary Jewish cultures. With essays by leading scholars in Jewish culture, this book offers a clear overview of the field and offers exciting new directions for the future.
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New York Sports

Glamour and Grit in the Empire City

Author: Stephen Norwood

Publisher: University of Arkansas Press

ISBN: 1610756355

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 410

View: 6748

New York has long been both America’s leading cultural center and its sports capital, with far more championship teams, intracity World Series, and major prizefights than any other city. Pro football’s “Greatest Game Ever Played” took place in New York, along with what was arguably history’s most significant boxing match, the 1938 title bout between Joe Louis and Max Schmeling. As the nation’s most crowded city, basketball proved to be an ideal sport, and for many years it was the site of the country’s most prestigious college basketball tournament. New York boasts storied stadiums, arenas, and gymnasiums and is the home of one of the world’s two leading marathons as well as the Belmont Stakes, the third event in horse racing’s Triple Crown. New York sportswriters also wield national influence and have done much to connect sports to larger social and cultural issues, and the vitality and distinctiveness of New York’s street games, its ethnic institutions, and its sports-centered restaurants and drinking establishments all contribute to the city’s uniqueness. New York Sports collects the work of fourteen leading sport historians, providing new insight into the social and cultural history of America’s major metropolis and of the United States. These writers address the topics of changing conceptions of manhood and violence, leisure and social class, urban night life and entertainment, women and athletics, ethnicity and assimilation, and more.
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Philly Sports

Teams, Games, and Athletes from Rocky's Town

Author: Ryan Swanson,David K. Wiggins

Publisher: University of Arkansas Press

ISBN: 1557281874

Category: History

Page: 334

View: 8987

Not distributed; available at Arkansas State Library.
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Sports in American History, 2E

From Colonization to Globalization

Author: Gems, Gerald,Borish, Linda,Pfister, Gertrud

Publisher: Human Kinetics

ISBN: 1492526525

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 400

View: 2371

Sports in American History: From Colonization to Globalization, Second Edition, journeys from the early American past to the present to give students a compelling grasp of the evolution of American sporting practices.
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Mishpachah

The Jewish Family in Tradition and in Transition

Author: Leonard J. Greenspoon

Publisher: Purdue University Press

ISBN: 1557537577

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 268

View: 646

Contains papers presented at the 27th Annual Klutznick-Harris-Schwalb Symposium, October 26-27, 2014, in Omaha, Nebraska.
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Jews in the Early Modern World

Author: Dean Phillip Bell

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780742545182

Category: Religion

Page: 301

View: 3865

Jews in the Early Modern World presents a comparative and global history of the Jews for the early modern period, 1400-1700. It traces the remarkable demographic changes experienced by Jews around the globe and assesses the impact of those changes on Jewish communal and social structures, religious and cultural practices, and relations with non-Jews.
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Jewish Culture and Society Under the Christian Roman Empire

Author: Richard Lee Kalmin,Seth Schwartz

Publisher: Peeters Publishers

ISBN: 9789042911819

Category: History

Page: 485

View: 1981

This book investigates the complexity, diversity, uniqueness and enduring significance of Jewish life in the Christian Roman Empire, from 312 to 634 C.E. During this period there occurred an unprecedented Jewish cultural explosion, encompassing the compilation and/or composition of such texts as the Palestinian Talmud, the main aggadic midrashim, an extensive magical/mystical literature, the revived apocalypse, a vast corpus of piyyutim and the beginnings of a practically oriented halakhic literature. Furthermore, this was the era of the florition of Jewish art, for it was only in the fourth century that a specifically Jewish iconographic language came into common use in synagogues and catacombs, the archaeological remains of almost all of which date from this period. This volume moves toward a synthesizing and contextualizing view of the Jewish cultural production of late antiquity, examining the interaction of Jews, Christians and pagans and with the emergence of new religious forms generated by such interaction.
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Judaism and Hellenism in Antiquity

Conflict or Confluence?

Author: Lee I. Levine

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295803827

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

View: 1242

Generations of scholars have debated the influence of Greco-Roman culture on Jewish society and the degree of its impact on Jewish material culture and religious practice in Palestine and the Diaspora of antiquity. Judaism and Hellenism in Antiquity examines this phenomenon from the aftermath of Alexander�s conquest to the Byzantine era, offering a balanced view of the literary, epigraphical, and archeological evidence attesting to the process of Hellenization in Jewish life and its impact on several aspects of Judaism as we know it today. Lee Levine approaches this broad subject in three essays, each focusing on diverse issues in Jewish culture: Jerusalem at the end of the Second Temple period, rabbinic tradition, and the ancient synagogue. With his comprehensive and thorough knowledge of the intricate dynamics of the Jewish and Greco-Roman societies, the author demonstrates the complexities of Hellenization and its role in shaping many aspects of Jewish life�economic, social, political, cultural, and religious. He argues against oversimplification and encourages a more nuanced view, whereby the Jews of antiquity survived and prospered, despite the social and political upheavals of this era, emerging as perpetuators of their own Jewish traditions while open to change from the outside world.
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Who Are the Jews of India?

Author: Nathan Katz

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520920729

Category: Religion

Page: 220

View: 9278

Of all the Diaspora communities, the Jews of India are among the least known and most interesting. This readable study, full of vivid details of everyday life, looks in depth at the religious life of the Jewish community in Cochin, the Bene Israel from the remote Konkan coast near Bombay, and the Baghdadi Jews, who migrated to Indian port cities and flourished under the British Raj. Who Are the Jews of India? is the first integrated, comprehensive work available on all three of India's Jewish communities. Using an interdisciplinary approach, Nathan Katz brings together methods and insights from religious studies, ritual studies, anthropology, history, linguistics, and folklore, as he discusses the strategies each community developed to maintain its Jewish identity. Based on extensive fieldwork throughout India, as well as close reading of historical documents, this study provides a striking new understanding of the Jewish Diaspora and of Hindu civilization as a whole.
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Hebrews of the Portuguese Nation

Conversos and Community in Early Modern Amsterdam

Author: Miriam Bodian

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 9780253213518

Category: History

Page: 219

View: 8464

In the 17th century, descendants of forcibly baptised Jews (conversos) fled the Iberian Inquisitions to settle in Amsterdam, a city renowned for its commercial ties and religious tolerance. On arrival the conversos lacked clear ethnic or religious identities and had little social organisation. Yet, they formed the nucleus of what became within a generation a strongly cohesive community with a highly structured and well-developed sense of its Jewish identity. Drawing on family and communal records, diaries, memoirs, literary works, and other sources, Miriam Bodian reconstructs the fascinating story of how these Portuguese immigrant--merchants, professionals, and intellectuals, For the most part--reasserted their Judaism, while maintaining their Iberian heritage.
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Jews and Muslims in the Arab World

Haunted by Pasts Real and Imagined

Author: Jacob Lassner,Selwyn Ilan Troen

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780742558427

Category: History

Page: 393

View: 8883

Whether real or imagined, the past filtered through their collective memories has an influence on how Jews and Arabs perceive themselves. This work highlights the effects of historical memory on the Arab-Israel conflict, demonstrating that Jews and Arabs use stories of distant pasts to create their identities and shape their politics.
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Daily Life of the Jews in the Middle Ages

Author: Norman Roth

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313328657

Category: History

Page: 231

View: 8938

Discusses daily life of Jews during the Middle Ages, examining such topics as education, marriage, synagogues, religous customs and observances, occupations, medicine, and literature.
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Living Letters of the Law

Ideas of the Jew in Medieval Christianity

Author: Jeremy Cohen

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520218703

Category: History

Page: 451

View: 4452

"Well, clearly, and articulately written, Living Letters of the Law is among the most important books in medieval European history generally, as well as in its particular field."--Edward Peters, author of The First Crusade
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Judaism on Trial

Jewish-Christian Disputations in the Middle Ages

Author: Hyam Maccoby

Publisher: Littman Library of Jewish

ISBN: 9781874774167

Category: History

Page: 245

View: 1748

This book focuses on the major Jewish-Chrisian disputations of medieval Europe: those of Paris (1240), Barcelona (1263), and Tortosa (1413-14).
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The Origin of the Jews

The Quest for Roots in a Rootless Age

Author: Steven Weitzman

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400884934

Category: Religion

Page: 408

View: 4627

The first major history of the scholarly quest to answer the question of Jewish origins The Jews have one of the longest continuously recorded histories of any people in the world, but what do we actually know about their origins? While many think the answer to this question can be found in the Bible, others look to archaeology or genetics. Some skeptics have even sought to debunk the very idea that the Jews have a common origin. In this book, Steven Weitzman takes a learned and lively look at what we know—or think we know—about where the Jews came from, when they arose, and how they came to be. Scholars have written hundreds of books on the topic and have come up with scores of explanations, theories, and historical reconstructions, but this is the first book to trace the history of the different approaches that have been applied to the question, including genealogy, linguistics, archaeology, psychology, sociology, and genetics. Weitzman shows how this quest has been fraught since its inception with religious and political agendas, how anti-Semitism cast its long shadow over generations of learning, and how recent claims about Jewish origins have been difficult to disentangle from the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. He does not offer neatly packaged conclusions but invites readers on an intellectual adventure, shedding new light on the assumptions and biases of those seeking answers—and the challenges that have made finding answers so elusive. Spanning more than two centuries and drawing on the latest findings, The Origin of the Jews brings needed clarity and historical context to this enduring and often divisive topic.
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Neighboring Faiths

Christianity, Islam, and Judaism in the Middle Ages and Today

Author: David Nirenberg

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022616909X

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 5057

Christianity, Judaism, and Islam are usually treated as autonomous religions, but in fact across the long course of their histories the three religions have developed in interaction with one another. In Neighboring Faiths, David Nirenberg examines how Muslims, Christians, and Jews lived with and thought about each other during the Middle Ages and what the medieval past can tell us about how they do so today. There have been countless scripture-based studies of the three “religions of the book,” but Nirenberg goes beyond those to pay close attention to how the three religious neighbors loved, tolerated, massacred, and expelled each other—all in the name of God—in periods and places both long ago and far away. Nirenberg argues that the three religions need to be studied in terms of how each affected the development of the others over time, their proximity of religious and philosophical thought as well as their overlapping geographies, and how the three “neighbors” define—and continue to define—themselves and their place in terms of one another. From dangerous attractions leading to interfaith marriage; to interreligious conflicts leading to segregation, violence, and sometimes extermination; to strategies for bridging the interfaith gap through language, vocabulary, and poetry, Nirenberg aims to understand the intertwined past of the three faiths as a way for their heirs to produce the future—together.
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Jewish People, Jewish Thought

The Jewish Experience in History

Author: Robert M. Seltzer

Publisher: Prentice Hall

ISBN: 9780024089403

Category: Religion

Page: 874

View: 6300

An extensive introduction to Jewish experience and thought combines social and political history and intellectual tradition and is complemented by historical photographs, illustrations of Jewish art, maps, and detailed chronological charts
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Unsettled

An Anthropology of the Jews

Author: Melvin Konner

Publisher: Viking Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 500

View: 7415

An anthropological analysis of the Jewish people and faith draws on archaeological findings, census data, religious texts, literature, and oral history to demonstrate how Jewish factors shaped the world and how the ongoing diaspora led to the rise of Jewish literacy, education, trade, and influence. 25,000 first printing.
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