Iroquoia

The Development of a Native World

Author: William Engelbrecht

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN: 9780815630609

Category: History

Page: 231

View: 1804

Drawing on archaeology, historical evidence, oral traditions, and linguistics, this book provides a view of Iroquois life from the prehistoric period and Owasco sites through the establishment of the Five Nations.
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At the Font of the Marvelous

Exploring Oral Narrative and Mythic Imagery of the Iroquois and Their Neighbors

Author: Anthony Wonderley

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN: 0815651376

Category: Social Science

Page: 188

View: 8556

The folktales and myths of the Iroquois and their Algonquian neighbors rank among the most imaginatively rich and narratively coherent traditions in North America. Mostly recorded around 1900, these oral narratives preserve the voice and something of the outlook of autochthonous Americans from a bygone age, when storytelling was an important facet of daily life. Inspired by these wondrous tales, Anthony Wonderley explores their significance to the Iroquois and Algonquian religion and worldview.
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After King Philip's War

Presence and Persistence in Indian New England

Author: Colin G. Calloway

Publisher: UPNE

ISBN: 1611680611

Category: History

Page: 278

View: 502

New perspectives on three centuries of Indian presence in New England
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The Texture of Contact

European and Indian Settler Communities on the Frontiers of Iroquoia, 1667-1783

Author: David L. Preston

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803225490

Category: History

Page: 408

View: 4165

The Texture of Contact is a landmark study of Iroquois and European communities and coexistence in eastern North America before the American Revolution. David L. Preston details the ways in which European and Iroquois settlers on the frontiers creatively adapted to each other’s presence, weaving webs of mutually beneficial social, economic, and religious relationships that sustained the peace for most of the eighteenth century. Drawing on a wealth of previously unexamined archival research, Preston describes everyday encounters between Europeans and Indians along the frontiers of the Iroquois Confederacy in the St. Lawrence, Mohawk, Susquehanna, and Ohio valleys. Homesteads, taverns, gristmills, churches, and markets were frequent sites of intercultural exchange and negotiation. Complex diplomatic and trading relationships developed as a result of European and Iroquois settlers bartering material goods. Innovative land-sharing arrangements included the common practice of Euroamerican farmers living as tenants of the Mohawks, sometimes for decades. This study reveals that the everyday lives of Indians and Europeans were far more complex and harmonious than past histories have suggested. Preston’s nuanced comparisons between various settlements also reveal the reasons why peace endured in the Mohawk and St. Lawrence valleys while warfare erupted in the Susquehanna and Ohio valleys. One of the most comprehensive studies of eighteenth-century Iroquois history, The Texture of Contact broadens our understanding of eastern North America’s frontiers and the key role that the Iroquois played in shaping that world.
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Seven Generations of Iroquois Leadership

The Six Nations Since 1800

Author: Laurence M. Hauptman

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN: 9780815631897

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 326

View: 3757

The author traces the past two hundred years of the Six Nations' history through the lens of the remarkable leaders who shaped it, in a volume that explores how they use the past to enable cultural, economic, and political survival. Simultaneous.
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21st Century Anthropology: A Reference Handbook

Author: H. James Birx

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 1412957389

Category: Social Science

Page: 1099

View: 6464

Via 100 entries or 'mini-chapters,' the SAGE 21st Century Reference Series volumes on Anthropology will highlight the most important topics, issues, questions, and debates any student obtaining a degree in the field of anthropology ought to have mastered for effectiveness in the 21st century. The purpose is to provide undergraduate students with an authoritative reference source that will serve their research needs with more detailed information than encyclopedia entries but not so much jargon, detail or density as a journal article or a research handbook chapter.
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Evolution of the Onondaga Iroquois

Accommodating Change, 1500-1655

Author: N.A

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803262362

Category: Social Science

Page: 260

View: 3442

The early history of the Onondaga Iroquois and their cultural responses to the European invasion are illuminated in this valuable study, Evolution of the Onondaga Iroquois. Drawing on a wealth of archaeological evidence and historical documents, James W. Bradley traces the origins of the Onondaga, beginning around a.d. 1200. Much attention is devoted to the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, which were marked by the introduction and growing popularity of European trade goods. Bradley shows how the Onondaga creatively used and viewed these exotic objects; such items as axes and kettles were adapted to meet traditional Native needs. ø During the period shortly after the first encounters with Europeans, the Onondaga successfully adjusted to changes in their world rather than being overwhelmed by them. Their accommodation resulted in such celebrated cross-cultural creations as wampum and the League of the Five Nations.
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America, history and life

Author: American Bibliographical Center,EBSCO Publishing (Firm)

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: United States

Page: N.A

View: 6864

Provides historical coverage of the United States and Canada from prehistory to the present. Includes information abstracted from over 2,000 journals published worldwide.
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Bibliographic Index

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Bibliographical literature

Page: 26

View: 475

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Reader's Guide to American History

Author: Peter J. Parish

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781884964220

Category: History

Page: 880

View: 7096

There are so many books on so many aspects of the history of the United States, offering such a wide variety of interpretations, that students, teachers, scholars, and librarians often need help and advice on how to find what they want. The Reader's Guide to American History is designed to meet that need by adopting a new and constructive approach to the appreciation of this rich historiography. Each of the 600 entries on topics in political, social and economic history describes and evaluates some 6 to 12 books on the topic, providing guidance to the reader on everything from broad surveys and interpretive works to specialized monographs. The entries are devoted to events and individuals, as well as broader themes, and are written by a team of well over 200 contributors, all scholars of American history.
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The Ordeal of the Longhouse

The Peoples of the Iroquois League in the Era of European Colonization

Author: Daniel K. Richter

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807867918

Category: History

Page: 454

View: 2014

Richter examines a wide range of primary documents to survey the responses of the peoples of the Iroquois League--the Mohawks, Oneidas, Onondagas, Cayugas, Senecas, and Tuscaroras--to the challenges of the European colonialization of North America. He demonstrates that by the early eighteenth century a series of creative adaptations in politics and diplomacy allowed the peoples of the Longhouse to preserve their cultural autonomy in a land now dominated by foreign powers.
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Thundersticks

Author: David J. Silverman

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674737471

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 2393

David Silverman argues against the notion that Indians prized flintlock muskets more for their pyrotechnics than for their efficiency as tools of war. Native peoples fully recognized the potential of firearms to assist them in their struggles against colonial forces, and mostly against one another, as arms races erupted across North America.
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Along the Hudson and Mohawk

The 1790 Journey of Count Paolo Andreani

Author: N.A

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812207217

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 1729

In the summer of 1790 the Italian explorer Count Paolo Andreani embarked on a journey that would take him through New York State and eastern Iroquoia. Traveling along the Hudson and Mohawk Rivers, Andreani kept a meticulous record of his observations and experiences in the New World. Published complete for the first time in English, the diary is of major importance to those interested in life after the American Revolution, political affairs in the New Republic, and Native American peoples. Through Andreani's writings, we glimpse a world in cultural, economic, and political transition. An active participant in Enlightenment science, Andreani provides detailed observations of the landscape and natural history of his route. He also documents the manners and customs of the Iroquois, Shakers, and German, Dutch, and Anglo New Yorkers. Andreani was particularly interested in the Oneida and Onondaga Indians he visited, and his description of an Oneida lacrosse match accompanies the earliest known depiction of a lacrosse stick. Andreani's American letters, included here, relate his sometimes difficult but always revealing personal relationships with Washington, Jefferson, and Adams. Prefaced by an illuminating historical and biographical introduction, Along the Hudson and Mohawk is a fascinating look at the New Republic as seen through the eyes of an observant and curious explorer.
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Choice

Publication of the Association of College and Research Libraries, a Division of the American Library Association

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Academic libraries

Page: N.A

View: 8136

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Trade, Land, Power

The Struggle for Eastern North America

Author: Daniel K. Richter

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812245008

Category: History

Page: 314

View: 1149

In this sweeping collection of essays, one of America's leading colonial historians reinterprets the struggle between Native peoples and Europeans in terms of how each understood the material basis of power. Throughout the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries in eastern North America, Natives and newcomers alike understood the close relationship between political power and control of trade and land, but they did so in very different ways. For Native Americans, trade was a collective act. The alliances that made a people powerful became visible through material exchanges that forged connections among kin groups, villages, and the spirit world. The land itself was often conceived as a participant in these transactions through the blessings it bestowed on those who gave in return. For colonizers, by contrast, power tended to grow from the individual accumulation of goods and landed property more than from collective exchange—from domination more than from alliance. For many decades, an uneasy balance between the two systems of power prevailed. Tracing the messy process by which global empires and their colonial populations could finally abandon compromise and impose their definitions on the continent, Daniel K. Richter casts penetrating light on the nature of European colonization, the character of Native resistance, and the formative roles that each played in the origins of the United States.
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Colonial America: Essays in Politics and Social Development

Author: Stanley Katz,John Murrin,Douglas Greenberg

Publisher: McGraw-Hill Humanities/Social Sciences/Languages

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 690

View: 9068

As an anthology of readings by top scholars in the field of Early American History, Colonial America: Essays in Politics and Social Development provides students with an insightful and critical view of the Colonial period. The Fifth Edition is heavily revised to reflect shifting emphasis on the continentalist approach to early American history. With seventeen new essays, including essays on the New France and Spanish borderlands, this reader continues to be a best-selling text in the Colonial America course.
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Iroquois Diplomacy on the Early American Frontier

Author: Timothy John Shannon

Publisher: Viking Adult

ISBN: N.A

Category: Diplomacy

Page: 260

View: 6946

A vividly drawn portrait of the powerful Iroquois nation during colonial America In the fourth title in The Penguin Library of American Indian History, Timothy J. Shannon tells the story of the most influential Native American confederacy of the colonial era. The Iroquois occupied a strategic region between Canada and New York and engaged in active trade and diplomacy with their colonial Dutch, French, and British neighbors. While they were famous as fierce warriors, it was actually their intercultural diplomacy that accounted for the span and endurance of their power in early America. By carefully maintaining their neutrality in the Anglo-French imperial wars in North America, they were able to claim an unrivaled influence in colonial America at a time when other Indian nations experienced dispossession and dispersal. Europeans who wanted to remain in the good graces of the Iroquois had to learn the ceremonies and the use of sacred objects that their diplomacy entailed. Shannon’s portrayal contradicts the notion of the “noble savage,” showing just how politically savvy—and at times treacherous—the Iroquois Nation was in the face of colonialism.
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The Indian History of an American Institution

Native Americans and Dartmouth

Author: Colin G. Calloway

Publisher: Dartmouth College Press

ISBN: 1584658444

Category: Social Science

Page: 280

View: 3298

A history of the complex relationship between a school and a people
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Indians and Europe

An Interdisciplinary Collection of Essays

Author: Christian F. Feest

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803268975

Category: History

Page: 643

View: 6989

North American Indians have fired the imaginations of Europeans for the past five hundred years. The Native populations of North America have served a variety of European cultural and emotional needs, ranging from noble savage role models for Old World civilization to a more sympathetic portrayal as subjugated victims of American imperialism. ø This comprehensive, interdisciplinary collection of essays offers the first in-depth, extended look at the complicated, changing relationship between European and Native peoples. The contributors explore three aspects of this relationship: Why and how did the cultures and histories of Europeans enable Native peoples to become absorbed into the reality of the Old World? What happened in actual encounters between American Indian visitors and their European hosts? How did continued and increased interaction between Indians and Europeans affect established imagery and preconceptions on both sides?
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