Indians, Missionaries, and Merchants

The Legacy of Colonial Encounters on the California Frontiers

Author: Kent G. Lightfoot

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520249984

Category: Social Science

Page: 338

View: 2089

"This is a remarkable contribution by an extraordinary anthropologist."—David Hurst Thomas, author of Skull Wars "A groundbreaking work that will be welcomed by both scholars and the general reader who wishes to understand the role of California's past in shaping its future."—Robert L. Hoover, Professor Emeritus, California Polytechnic State University "This is essential reading for every California historian and archaeologist and a superb choice for undergraduate classrooms. Lightfoot's authoritative account gives a long-silenced voice to the many Indians of California."—Jeanne E. Arnold, editor of The Origins of a Pacific Coast Chiefdom
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Legacies of Space and Intangible Heritage

Archaeology, Ethnohistory, and the Politics of Cultural Continuity in the Americas

Author: Fernando Armstrong-Fumero,Julio Hoil Gutierrez

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: 1607325721

Category: Social Science

Page: 258

View: 5327

Legacies of Space and Intangible Heritage is an interdisciplinary exploration of the intersections between the study and management of physical sites and the reproduction of intangible cultural legacies. The volume provides nine case studies that explore different ways in which place is mediated by social, political, and ecological processes that have deep historical roots and that continue to affect the politics of heritage management. Spaces of human habitation are both historical records of the past and key elements in reproducing the knowledge and values that define lives in the present. Practices, knowledge, and skills that communities recognize as part of their culture—and that a range of legal statutes define as protected intangible heritages—are threatened by increased migration, the displacement of indigenous peoples, and limits on access to culturally or historically significant sites. This volume addresses how different physical environments contribute to the reproduction of cultural forms even in the wake of these processes of displacement and change. Case studies from North and South America reveal a pattern of abandonment and reestablishment of settlements and show how collective memory drives people back to culturally meaningful sites. This tendency for communities to return to the sites that shaped their collective histories, along with the growing importance granted to intangible heritage, challenges archaeologists and other heritage workers to find new ways of incorporating the cultural legacies that link societies to place into the work of research and stewardship. By examining the politics of cultural continuity through the lenses of archaeology and ethnohistory, Legacies of Space and Intangible Heritage demonstrates this complex relationship between a people’s heritage and the landscape that affects the making of "place." Contributors: Rani Alexander, Hannah Becker, Minette Church, Bonnie Clark, Chip Colwell, Winifred Creamer, Emiliana Cruz, T. J. Ferguson, Julio Hoil Gutierrez, Jonathan Haas, Saul Hedquist, Maren Hopkins, Stuart B. Koyiyumptewa, Christine Kray, Henry Marcelo Castillo, Anna Roosevelt, Jason Yaeger, Keiko Yoneda
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Reservation Reelism

Redfacing, Visual Sovereignty, and Representations of Native Americans in Film

Author: Michelle H. Raheja

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803268270

Category: Social Science

Page: 376

View: 5849

In this deeply engaging account Michelle H. Raheja offers the first book-length study of the Indigenous actors, directors, and spectators who helped shape Hollywood’s representation of Indigenous peoples. Since the era of silent films, Hollywood movies and visual culture generally have provided the primary representational field on which Indigenous images have been displayed to non-Native audiences. These films have been highly influential in shaping perceptions of Indigenous peoples as, for example, a dying race or as inherently unable or unwilling to adapt to change. However, films with Indigenous plots and subplots also signify at least some degree of Native presence in a culture that largely defines Native peoples as absent or separate. Native actors, directors, and spectators have had a part in creating these cinematic representations and have thus complicated the dominant, and usually negative, messages about Native peoples that films portray. In Reservation Reelism Raheja examines the history of these Native actors, directors, and spectators, reveals their contributions, and attempts to create positive representations in film that reflect the complex and vibrant experiences of Native peoples and communities.
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Edible Memory

The Lure of Heirloom Tomatoes and Other Forgotten Foods

Author: Jennifer A. Jordan

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022622824X

Category: Cooking

Page: 336

View: 1524

Each week during the growing season, farmers’ markets offer up such delicious treasures as brandywine tomatoes, cosmic purple carrots, pink pearl apples, and chioggia beets—varieties of fruits and vegetables that are prized by home chefs and carefully stewarded by farmers from year to year. These are the heirlooms and the antiques of the food world, endowed with their own rich histories. While cooking techniques and flavor fads have changed from generation to generation, a Ribston Pippin apple today can taste just as flavorful as it did in the eighteenth century. But how does an apple become an antique and a tomato an heirloom? In Edible Memory, Jennifer A. Jordan examines the ways that people around the world have sought to identify and preserve old-fashioned varieties of produce. In doing so, Jordan shows that these fruits and vegetables offer a powerful emotional and physical connection to a shared genetic, cultural, and culinary past. Jordan begins with the heirloom tomato, inquiring into its botanical origins in South America and its culinary beginnings in Aztec cooking to show how the homely and homegrown tomato has since grown to be an object of wealth and taste, as well as a popular symbol of the farm-to-table and heritage foods movements. She shows how a shift in the 1940s away from open pollination resulted in a narrow range of hybrid tomato crops. But memory and the pursuit of flavor led to intense seed-saving efforts increasing in the 1970s, as local produce and seeds began to be recognized as living windows to the past. In the chapters that follow, Jordan combines lush description and thorough research as she investigates the long history of antique apples; changing tastes in turnips and related foods like kale and parsnips; the movement of vegetables and fruits around the globe in the wake of Columbus; and the poignant, perishable world of stone fruits and tropical fruit, in order to reveal the connections—the edible memories—these heirlooms offer for farmers, gardeners, chefs, diners, and home cooks. This deep culinary connection to the past influences not only the foods we grow and consume, but the ways we shape and imagine our farms, gardens, and local landscapes. From the farmers’ market to the seed bank to the neighborhood bistro, these foods offer essential keys not only to our past but also to the future of agriculture, the environment, and taste. By cultivating these edible memories, Jordan reveals, we can stay connected to a delicious heritage of historic flavors, and to the pleasures and possibilities for generations of feasts to come.
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Lands Never Trodden

The Franciscans and the California Missions

Author: John J. O'Hagan

Publisher: Caxton Press

ISBN: 0870045741

Category: Architecture

Page: 405

View: 8617

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California Indians and Their Environment

An Introduction

Author: Kent Lightfoot,Otis Parrish

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520942280

Category: Nature

Page: 512

View: 5848

Capturing the vitality of California's unique indigenous cultures, this major new introduction incorporates the extensive research of the past thirty years into an illuminating, comprehensive synthesis for a wide audience. Based in part on new archaeological findings, it tells how the California Indians lived in vibrant polities, each boasting a rich village life including chiefs, religious specialists, master craftspeople, dances, feasts, and ceremonies. Throughout, the book emphasizes how these diverse communities interacted with the state's varied landscape, enhancing its already bountiful natural resources through various practices centered around prescribed burning. A handy reference section, illustrated with more than one hundred color photographs, describes the plants, animals, and minerals the California Indians used for food, basketry and cordage, medicine, and more. At a time when we are grappling with the problems of maintaining habitat diversity and sustainable economies, we find that these native peoples and their traditions have much to teach us about the future, as well as the past, of California.
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Pablo Tac, Indigenous Scholar

Writing on Luiseño Language and Colonial History, C. 1840

Author: Lisbeth Haas

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520261895

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 267

View: 1725

"Pablo Tac's life was both tragic and victorious, and his experiences echo down through the years, offering the light of understanding to us in our world today. A thought-provoking book and a must-read for students of indigenous California." --Ernest Siva, author of Voices of the Flute: Songs of Three Southern California Indian Nations "This is an exceptional piece of research and the definitive work on Pablo Tac. For the first time the entire corpus of the known writings of this ground-breaking Native Californian scholar are presented without editing, in their original languages (Latin, Luiseño) and in English translation. Lisbeth Haas presents a lucid and insightful account on the life, times, and significance of this important figure, while James Luna provides provocative commentary and striking images about Indian life today in the footsteps of Pablo Tac. This book belongs in the library of anyone interested in California history, Native Californians, and the Franciscan missions." --Kent Lightfoot, author of Indians, Missionaries, and Merchants: The Legacy of Colonial Encounters on the California Frontiers "Lisbeth Haas must be praised for gathering an exceptional team of scholars for the transcription, editing, and translation of Pablo Tac's Luiseño grammar, dictionary, and history. Haas's introductory essay situates Tac in a global context, defined by the fellow students Tac found in Rome in the 1830s while studying for the priesthood. Performance artist James Luna complements Haas's lucid assessment of Tac's brilliance as an indigenous scholar with a verbal and visual testimony of shared struggles as cultural warriors." --José Rabasa, author of Without History: Subaltern Studies, the Zapatista Insurgency, and the Specter of History "The important manuscripts of the young nineteenth-century Luiseño scholar Pablo Tac are available at last to the American public, and most importantly to the people of Tac's homeland. This faithful representation and translation of his work is fascinating in its own right, and enriched further by the insightful introductions by scholar Lisbeth Haas and Luiseño artist and wordsmith James Luna. Tac interweaves his masterful linguistic description and unfinished dictionary of nineteenth-century Luiseño with an illuminating account of Luiseño life and history before and during the mission era. Haas provides an equally interesting description of the scholarly and political environment of Rome where Tac lived, learned, and created from 1834 to 1841. Luna's introduction and a foreword by the Luiseño tribal chair bring a twenty-first century indigenous interpretation to Tac's long-ago life and work. Yet there is a freshness to Tac's writing that is ageless, and makes us wish we could learn even more about this talented young man who participated in so many worlds, and whose life and career were too short." --Leanne Hinton, author of Flutes of Fire: Essays on California Indian Languages
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Children of Coyote, Missionaries of Saint Francis

Indian-Spanish Relations in Colonial California, 1769-1850

Author: Steven W. Hackel

Publisher: University of North Carolina Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 476

View: 7568

Explores the survival of Californian Indian culture amidst the Franciscan missionary rule, the Spaniard liberation, political change, disease, depopulation, the influx of settlers, and America's westward expansion. Simultaneous.
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Missionalia

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Christianity

Page: N.A

View: 6037

Contains abstracts of missiological contributions, book reviews, and articles.
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Strangers in a Stolen Land

Indians of San Diego County from Prehistory to the New Deal

Author: Richard L. Carrico

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780932653826

Category: History

Page: 203

View: 2198

The story of the native peoples of San Diego County including Kumeyaay (Ipai/Tipai), Luiseño, Cupeño, and Cahuilla, from their prehistoric origins through the Spanish, Mexican, and American periods; contains previously unpublished maps and illustrations.
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Big Dogs and Scorched Streams

Horses and Ethnocultural Change in the North American West, 1700-1850

Author: Steven Michael Fountain

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Frontier and pioneer life

Page: 468

View: 863

"Horses shaped the North American West like no other animal. They became the most important European goods introduced to the Americas for indigenous peoples, whether used as tools, transportation, game replacement, or as measures of wealth. These new animals triggered cultural changes ranging from intensification of older practices to near complete reorganization of tribal life. Colonizing Europeans also relied upon horses to carry out imperial schemes and possession of horses often determined the relationship between Native Americans and newcomers. However, many Native Americans chose not to place horses and equestrianism at the center of their culture. Three cases demonstrate a range of historical responses to European colonization and horses. Shoshone peoples of the Snake Country used their early acquisition of horses to become a quintessential mounted culture. Horses enabled "Snakes" to become the dominant people of the American West in the eighteenth century, but the tenuousness of this equestrian system was apparent by the early nineteenth century. Yokuts in the Tulare Country also adopted an effective equestrian system until malaria transformed these horsed peoples to horselessness. In between, Paiutes and Shoshones of the Humboldt Country used horses as a game replacement, earning them the scorn of overland emigrants. Maintaining horse herds outside of grassland regions or adjacent to the sudden influx of the gold rush was a poor strategy but Euroamericans derided peoples remaining "horseless" nonetheless. Based in early observations of mountain men and overlanders, historians and anthropologists alike have long characterized non-equestrian "Diggers" as poor and backwards compared to their mounted counterparts. Euroamericans respected potential economic partners and acquisitive equestrian Indians far more than troublesome (though supposedly horseless) stock raiders. However, despite the short-term advantages of an equestrian strategy for Native Americans, American expansion and Indian Removal in the West focused on the potential threat of horse-centered tribes. The variety of horse uses thus shaped the legacy of federal relationships with the indigenous peoples of the American West."--Leaves ii-iii.
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California History

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: California

Page: N.A

View: 1880

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Conquering the Frontier

Contests for Religion, Survival, and Profits in Northwestern Mexico, 1768-1855

Author: José Refugio de la Torre Curiel

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: 702

View: 3486

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Choice

Publication of the Association of College and Research Libraries, a Division of the American Library Association

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Academic libraries

Page: N.A

View: 4638

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Book Review Digest

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Bibliography

Page: N.A

View: 1806

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