In Brown's Wake

Legacies of America's Educational Landmark

Author: Martha Minow

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199779789

Category: Law

Page: 320

View: 3248

What is the legacy of Brown vs. Board of Education? While it is well known for establishing racial equality as a central commitment of American schools, the case also inspired social movements for equality in education across all lines of difference, including language, gender, disability, immigration status, socio-economic status, religion, and sexual orientation. Yet more than a half century after Brown, American schools are more racially separated than before, and educators, parents and policy makers still debate whether the ruling requires all-inclusive classrooms in terms of race, gender, disability, and other differences. In Brown's Wake examines the reverberations of Brown in American schools, including efforts to promote equal opportunities for all kinds of students. School choice, once a strategy for avoiding Brown, has emerged as a tool to promote integration and opportunities, even as charter schools and private school voucher programs enable new forms of self-separation by language, gender, disability, and ethnicity. Martha Minow, Dean of Harvard Law School, argues that the criteria placed on such initiatives carry serious consequences for both the character of American education and civil society itself. Although the original promise of Brown remains more symbolic than effective, Minow demonstrates the power of its vision in the struggles for equal education regardless of students' social identity, not only in the United States but also in many countries around the world. Further, she urges renewed commitment to the project of social integration even while acknowledging the complex obstacles that must be overcome. An elegant and concise overview of Brown and its aftermath, In Brown's Wake explores the broad-ranging and often surprising impact of one of the century's most important Supreme Court decisions.
Release

"Brown" in Baltimore

School Desegregation and the Limits of Liberalism

Author: Howell S. Baum

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801457106

Category: Education

Page: N.A

View: 9732

In the first book to present the history of Baltimore school desegregation, Howell S. Baum shows how good intentions got stuck on what Gunnar Myrdal called the "American Dilemma." Immediately after the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision, the city's liberal school board voted to desegregate and adopted a free choice policy that made integration voluntary. Baltimore's school desegregation proceeded peacefully, without the resistance or violence that occurred elsewhere. However, few whites chose to attend school with blacks, and after a few years of modest desegregation, schools resegregated and became increasingly segregated. The school board never changed its policy. Black leaders had urged the board to adopt free choice and, despite the limited desegregation, continued to support the policy and never sued the board to do anything else. Baum finds that American liberalism is the key to explaining how this happened. Myrdal observed that many whites believed in equality in the abstract but considered blacks inferior and treated them unequally. School officials were classical liberals who saw the world in terms of individuals, not races. They adopted a desegregation policy that explicitly ignored students' race and asserted that all students were equal in freedom to choose schools, while their policy let whites who disliked blacks avoid integration. School officials' liberal thinking hindered them from understanding or talking about the city's history of racial segregation, continuing barriers to desegregation, and realistic change strategies. From the classroom to city hall, Baum examines how Baltimore's distinct identity as a border city between North and South shaped local conversations about the national conflict over race and equality. The city's history of wrestling with the legacy of Brown reveals Americans' preferred way of dealing with racial issues: not talking about race. This avoidance, Baum concludes, allows segregation to continue.
Release

Effective Inclusive Schools

Designing Successful Schoolwide Programs

Author: Thomas Hehir,Lauren I. Katzman

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 111813365X

Category: Education

Page: 276

View: 8653

How to raise the achievement of all kids, from gifted to those with severe disabilities This book presents lessons learned from in-depth case studies of some of our most effective inclusive public schools. The authors conclusively demonstrate that schools can educate students with mild and severe disabilities in general education classrooms by providing special education services that link to and bolster general education instruction. This goes beyond complying with Special Education law; having a truly inclusive environment raises the achievement level for all students and results in more committed and satisfied teachers. Insights shared from teachers, school leaders, parents, and the students themselves provide a path forward for anyone striving to Improve special education services. The authors reveal what these exemplary schools do that makes them so successful, and provide advice for readers who want to incorporate these practices themselves. Hehir, former U.S. Office of Special Education (OSEP) Director, is a leading name in Special Education Highlights the important relationships between administrators, teachers, and parents to foster maximum collaboration between general and special education Includes information on committing to Universal Design for Learning (UDL) and Positive Behavior Supports This vital resource zeroes in on what excellent public schools do differently to ensure all students succeed.
Release

In Search of Jefferson's Moose

Notes on the State of Cyberspace

Author: David G. Post

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199743988

Category: Law

Page: 264

View: 9195

In 1787, Thomas Jefferson, then the American Minister to France, had the "complete skeleton, skin & horns" of an American moose shipped to him in Paris and mounted in the lobby of his residence as a symbol of the vast possibilities contained in the strange and largely unexplored New World. Taking a cue from Jefferson's efforts, David Post, one of the nation's leading Internet scholars, here presents a pithy, colorful exploration of the still mostly undiscovered territory of cyberspace--what it is, how it works, and how it should be governed. What law should the Internet have, and who should make it? What are we to do, and how are we to think, about online filesharing and copyright law, about Internet pornography and free speech, about controlling spam, and online gambling, and cyberterrorism, and the use of anonymous remailers, or the practice of telemedicine, or the online collection and dissemination of personal information? How can they be controlled? Should they be controlled? And by whom? Post presents the Jeffersonian ideal--small self-governing units, loosely linked together as peers in groups of larger and larger size--as a model for the Internet and for cyberspace community self-governance. Deftly drawing on Jefferson's writings on the New World in Notes on the State of Virginia, Post draws out the many similarities (and differences) between the two terrains, vividly describing how the Internet actually functions from a technological, legal, and social perspective as he uniquely applies Jefferson's views on natural history, law, and governance in the New World to illuminate the complexities of cyberspace. In Search of Jefferson's Moose is a lively, accessible, and remarkably original overview of the Internet and what it holds for the future.
Release

The First Global Prosecutor

Promise and Constraints

Author: Martha Minow,C. C True-Frost,Alex Whiting

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 0472052519

Category: Law

Page: 396

View: 4501

Legal scholars and practitioners examine the role of the ICC’s first prosecutor
Release

Advancing the Ball

Race, Reformation, and the Quest for Equal Coaching Opportunity in the NFL

Author: N. Jeremi Duru

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199792267

Category: Law

Page: 224

View: 3895

Following the NFL's desegregation in 1946, opportunities became increasingly plentiful for African American players--but not African American coaches. Although Major League Baseball and the NBA made progress in this regard over the years, the NFL's head coaches were almost exclusively white up until the mid-1990s. Advancing the Ball chronicles the campaign of former Cleveland Browns offensive lineman John Wooten to right this wrong and undo decades of discriminatory head coach hiring practices--an initiative that finally bore fruit when he joined forces with attorneys Cyrus Mehri and Johnnie Cochran. Together with a few allies, the triumvirate galvanized the NFL's African American assistant coaches to stand together for equal opportunity and convinced the league to enact the "Rooney Rule," which stipulates that every team must interview at least one minority candidate when searching for a new head coach. In doing so, they spurred a movement that would substantially impact the NFL and, potentially, the nation. Featuring an impassioned foreword by Coach Tony Dungy, Advancing the Ball offers an eye-opening, first-hand look at how a few committed individuals initiated a sea change in America's most popular sport and added an extraordinary new chapter to the civil rights story.
Release

The Sit-Ins

Protest and Legal Change in the Civil Rights Era

Author: Christopher W. Schmidt

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226522302

Category: Law

Page: 256

View: 9345

On February 1, 1960, four African American college students entered the Woolworth department store in Greensboro, North Carolina, and sat down at the lunch counter. This lunch counter, like most in the American South, refused to serve black customers. The four students remained in their seats until the store closed. In the following days, they returned, joined by growing numbers of fellow students. These “sit-in” demonstrations soon spread to other southern cities, drawing in thousands of students and coalescing into a protest movement that would transform the struggle for racial equality. The Sit-Ins tells the story of the student lunch counter protests and the national debate they sparked over the meaning of the constitutional right of all Americans to equal protection of the law. Christopher W. Schmidt describes how behind the now-iconic scenes of African American college students sitting in quiet defiance at “whites only” lunch counters lies a series of underappreciated legal dilemmas—about the meaning of the Constitution, the capacity of legal institutions to remedy different forms of injustice, and the relationship between legal reform and social change. The students’ actions initiated a national conversation over whether the Constitution’s equal protection clause extended to the activities of private businesses that served the general public. The courts, the traditional focal point for accounts of constitutional disputes, played an important but ultimately secondary role in this story. The great victory of the sit-in movement came not in the Supreme Court, but in Congress, with the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, landmark legislation that recognized the right African American students had claimed for themselves four years earlier. The Sit-Ins invites a broader understanding of how Americans contest and construct the meaning of their Constitution.
Release

The Enduring Legacy of Rodriguez

Creating New Pathways to Equal Educational Opportunity

Author: Charles J. Ogletree, Jr.,Kimberly Jenkins Robinson

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781612508313

Category: Education

Page: 376

View: 6259

In "The Enduring Legacy of "Rodriguez, leading legal and educational scholars examine "San Antonio Independent School District v. Rodriguez "(1973), the landmark US Supreme Court decision that held that the Constitution does not guarantee equality of educational opportunity. This ambitious volume assesses the history of the decision and presents a variety of creative strategies to address the pernicious effects of inequality on student learning and achievement. Ogletree, Robinson, and their expert cowriters offer hope that this decision can be reversed or that other ways can be found to counter its ill effects. This book is a thoughtful and overdue contribution to improving schools. Jack Jennings, author, "Presidents, Congress, and the Public Schools" There is an enduring tradition in this nation of relentless legal scholars who stand as champions for educational equity. This important volume follows in that tradition, deftly charting the future of educational opportunity. Ronald F. Ferguson, faculty cochair and director, The Achievement Gap Initiative, Harvard University Ogletree and Robinson remind us that equalizing educational opportunity in the United States is going to require fundamental changes in law and policy from many directions, from how we allocate our financial resources to rethinking our housing policies. Their book makes a very important contribution toward broadening the conversation we re having around reforming education. Wendy Kopp, cofounder and CEO, Teach For All The Supreme Court s effective abdication of any role in securing equal educational opportunity requires us to continue to grapple with the past, present, and future effects of the "Rodriguez" decision, and the essays here make essential contributions to that endeavor. Thomas A. Saenz, president and general counsel, Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund Charles J. Ogletree, Jr., is the Jesse Climenko Professor of Law and founding and executive director of the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice at Harvard Law School. Kimberly Jenkins Robinson is a professor at the University of Richmond School of Law and a researcher at the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice. James E. Ryan is the dean and Charles William Eliot Professor of Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education."
Release

The Second Reconstruction

A History of the Modern Civil Rights Movement

Author: Gary Donaldson

Publisher: Krieger Publishing Company

ISBN: N.A

Category: Political Science

Page: 153

View: 1844

This text traces the history of the civil rights movement in the years following World War II, to the present day. Issues discussed the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights of 1965, and the Northern Ireland ghetto's.
Release

Political Evil

What It Is and How to Combat It

Author: Alan Wolfe

Publisher: Vintage Books

ISBN: 0307473015

Category: Philosophy

Page: 339

View: 305

A leading political scientist identifies "political evil" as wrongdoing perpetrated by individuals with specific political goals, cites specific examples throughout the world and explains that important changes can be initiated through adjustments in how political evil is treated.
Release

Breaking the Cycles of Hatred

Memory, Law, and Repair

Author: Martha Minow

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400825387

Category: Law

Page: 312

View: 4194

Violence so often begets violence. Victims respond with revenge only to inspire seemingly endless cycles of retaliation. Conflicts between nations, between ethnic groups, between strangers, and between family members differ in so many ways and yet often share this dynamic. In this powerful and timely book Martha Minow and others ask: What explains these cycles and what can break them? What lessons can we draw from one form of violence that might be relevant to other forms? Can legal responses to violence provide accountability but avoid escalating vengeance? If so, what kinds of legal institutions and practices can make a difference? What kinds risk failure? Breaking the Cycles of Hatred represents a unique blend of political and legal theory, one that focuses on the double-edged role of memory in fueling cycles of hatred and maintaining justice and personal integrity. Its centerpiece comprises three penetrating essays by Minow. She argues that innovative legal institutions and practices, such as truth commissions and civil damage actions against groups that sponsor hate, often work better than more conventional criminal proceedings and sanctions. Minow also calls for more sustained attention to the underlying dynamics of violence, the connections between intergroup and intrafamily violence, and the wide range of possible responses to violence beyond criminalization. A vibrant set of freestanding responses from experts in political theory, psychology, history, and law examines past and potential avenues for breaking cycles of violence and for deepening our capacity to avoid becoming what we hate. The topics include hate crimes and hate-crimes legislation, child sexual abuse and the statute of limitations, and the American kidnapping and internment of Japanese Latin Americans during World War II. Commissioned by Nancy Rosenblum, the essays are by Ross E. Cheit, Marc Galanter, Fredrick C. Harris, Judith Lewis Herman, Carey Jaros, Frederick M. Lawrence, Austin Sarat, Ayelet Shachar, Eric K. Yamamoto, and Iris Marion Young.
Release

Improving the Odds for America's Children

Future Directions in Policy and Practice

Author: Kathleen McCartney,Hirokazu Yoshikawa,Laurie B. Forcier

Publisher: Harvard Education Press

ISBN: 9781612506890

Category: Education

Page: 296

View: 9445

Commemorating the 40th anniversary of the Children's Defense Fund, this book examines the challenges we must meet now and in the future on behalf of our young people. The book examines critical issues - prenatal and infant health and development, early child care and education, school reform, the achievement gap, vulnerable children, juvenile justice and child poverty - and highlights the crucial practical and policy measures we need to consider and undertake if we are to better serve our children.
Release

Women and the Law Stories

Author: Elizabeth M. Schneider,Stephanie M. Wildman

Publisher: Foundation Press

ISBN: 9781599415895

Category: Law

Page: 475

View: 5254

This book examines landmark cases establishing women's legal rights, offering accounts of the litigants, history, parties, strategies, and theoretical implications. It will enrich any law school course and can serve as a text for a course on women and the law, gender and law, feminist jurisprudence, or women's studies. This volume utilizes subject areas common to many women and law casebooks: history, constitutional law, reproductive freedom, the workplace, the family, and women in the legal profession. Several chapters explore issues of domestic violence and rape. See http://law.scu.edu/socialjustice/women-and-the-law-stories-book.cfm (a website with additional resources for teaching).
Release

Between Vengeance and Forgiveness

Facing History after Genocide and Mass Violence

Author: Martha Minow

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 080704508X

Category: Political Science

Page: 224

View: 1888

The rise of collective violence and genocide is the twentieth century's most terrible legacy. Martha Minow, a Harvard law professor and one of our most brilliant and humane legal minds, offers a landmark book on our attempts to heal after such large-scale tragedy. Writing with informed, searching prose of the extraordinary drama of the truth commissions in Argentina, East Germany, and most notably South Africa; war-crime prosecutions in Nuremberg and Bosnia; and reparations in America, Minow looks at the strategies and results of these riveting national experiments in justice and healing. From the Trade Paperback edition.
Release

The Scholar Denied

W. E. B. Du Bois and the Birth of Modern Sociology

Author: Aldon Morris

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520276353

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 7121

In this groundbreaking book, Aldon D. Morris’s ambition is truly monumental: to help rewrite the history of sociology and to acknowledge the primacy of W. E. B. Du Bois’s work in the founding of the discipline. Calling into question the prevailing narrative of how sociology developed, Morris, a major scholar of social movements, probes the way in which the history of the discipline has traditionally given credit to Robert E. Park at the University of Chicago, who worked with the conservative black leader Booker T. Washington to render Du Bois invisible. Morris uncovers the seminal theoretical work of Du Bois in developing a “scientific” sociology through a variety of methodologies and examines how the leading scholars of the day disparaged and ignored Du Bois’s work. The Scholar Denied is based on extensive, rigorous primary source research; the book is the result of a decade of research, writing, and revision. In exposing the economic and political factors that marginalized the contributions of Du Bois and enabled Park and his colleagues to be recognized as the “fathers” of the discipline, Morris delivers a wholly new narrative of American intellectual and social history that places one of America’s key intellectuals, W. E. B. Du Bois, at its center. The Scholar Denied is a must-read for anyone interested in American history, racial inequality, and the academy. In challenging our understanding of the past, the book promises to engender debate and discussion.
Release

Government by Contract

Outsourcing and American Democracy

Author: Jody Freeman,Martha Minow

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674032088

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 528

View: 5919

The dramatic growth of government over the course of the twentieth century since the New Deal prompts concern among libertarians and conservatives and also among those who worry about governmentâe(tm)s costs, efficiency, and quality of service. These concerns, combined with rising confidence in private markets, motivate the widespread shift of federal and state government work to private organizations. This shift typically alters only who performs the work, not who pays or is ultimately responsible for it. âeoeGovernment by contractâe now includes military intelligence, environmental monitoring, prison management, and interrogation of terrorism suspects. Outsourcing government work raises questions of accountability. What role should costs, quality, and democratic oversight play in contracting out government work? What tools do citizens and consumers need to evaluate the effectiveness of government contracts? How can the work be structured for optimal performance as well as compliance with public values? Government by Contract explains the phenomenon and scope of government outsourcing and sets an agenda for future research attentive to workforce capacities as well as legal, economic, and political concerns.
Release

On Her Own Ground

The Life and Times of Madam C.J. Walker

Author: A'Lelia Bundles

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0743215702

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 416

View: 2021

On Her Own Ground is the first full-scale, definitive biography of Madam C. J. Walker—the legendary African American entrepreneur and philanthropist—by her great-great-granddaughter, A'Lelia Bundles. The daughter of slaves, Madam C. J. Walker was orphaned at seven, married at fourteen and widowed at twenty. She spent the better part of the next two decades laboring as a washerwoman for $1.50 a week. Then—with the discovery of a revolutionary hair care formula for black women—everything changed. By her death in 1919, Walker managed to overcome astonishing odds: building a storied beauty empire from the ground up, amassing wealth unprecedented among black women and devoting her life to philanthropy and social activism. Along the way, she formed friendships with great early-twentieth-century politi-cal figures such as W.E.B. Du Bois and Booker T. Washington. On Her Own Ground is not only the first comprehensive biography of one of recent history's most amazing entrepreneurs and philanthropists, it is about a woman who is truly an African American icon. Drawn from more than two decades of exhaustive research, the book is enriched by the author's exclusive access to personal letters, records and never-before-seen photographs from the family collection. Bundles also showcases Walker's complex relationship with her daughter, A'Lelia Walker, a celebrated hostess of the Harlem Renaissance and renowned friend to both Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston. In chapters such as “Freedom Baby,” “Motherless Child,” “Bold Moves” and “Black Metropolis,” Bundles traces her ancestor's improbable rise to the top of an international hair care empire that would be run by four generations of Walker women until its sale in 1985. Along the way, On Her Own Ground reveals surprising insights, tells fascinating stories and dispels many misconceptions.
Release

Courage to Dissent

Atlanta and the Long History of the Civil Rights Movement

Author: Tomiko Brown-Nagin

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199932018

Category: History

Page: 578

View: 6422

Offers a sweeping history of the civil rights movement in Atlanta from the end of World War II to 1980, arguing the motivations of the movement were much more complicated than simply a desire for integration.
Release

An American Family

A Memoir of Hope and Sacrifice

Author: Khizr Khan

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 0399592504

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 407

This inspiring memoir by the Muslim American Gold Star father and captivating DNC speaker is the story of one family’s pursuit of the American dream. NAMED ONE OF THE FIVE BEST MEMOIRS OF THE YEAR BY THE WASHINGTON POST “Moving . . . a story about family and faith, told with a poet’s sensibility . . . Khizr Khan’s book can teach all of us what real American patriotism looks like.” —The New York Times Book Review In fewer than three hundred words, Khizr Khan electrified viewers around the world when he took the stage at the 2016 Democratic National Convention. And when he offered to lend Donald Trump his own much-read and dog-eared pocket Constitution, his gesture perfectly encapsulated the feelings of millions. But who was that man, standing beside his wife, extolling the promises and virtues of the U.S. Constitution? In this urgent and timeless immigrant story, we learn that Khizr Khan has been many things. He was the oldest of ten children born to farmers in Pakistan, and a curious and thoughtful boy who listened rapt as his grandfather recited Rumi beneath the moonlight. He was a university student who read the Declaration of Independence and was awestruck by what might be possible in life. He was a hopeful suitor, awkwardly but earnestly trying to win the heart of a woman far out of his league. He was a brilliant and diligent young family man who worked two jobs to save enough money to put himself through Harvard Law School. He was a loving father who, having instilled in his children the ideals that brought him and his wife to America—the sense of shared dignity and mutual responsibility—tragically lost his son, an Army captain killed while protecting his base camp in Iraq. He was and is a patriot, and a fierce advocate for the rights, dignities, and values enshrined in the American system. An American Family shows us who Khizr Khan and millions of other American immigrants are, and why—especially in these tumultuous times—we must not be afraid to step forward for what we believe in when it matters most. Praise for An American Family “An American Family is a small but lovely immigrant’s journey, full of carefully observed details from the order in which Ghazala served tea at a university event, to the schedule of the police patrols in the Boston Public Garden where Khan briefly slept while he was in between apartments, to the description of Humayun’s headstone as a ‘slab of white marble with soft streaks the color of wood smoke.’”—Alyssa Rosenberg, The Washington Post
Release

Imagine coexistence

restoring humanity after violent ethnic conflict

Author: Antonia Handler Chayes,Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School

Publisher: Jossey-Bass Inc Pub

ISBN: N.A

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 350

View: 9565

In the last decade, the world has witnessed a dramatic increase in the number of ethnic conflicts worldwide. But what do nations that have been in bloody conflicts do when the shooting stops? How can people who have been engaged in terrorist genocidal wars ever return to a situation of peaceful coexistence? "Imagine Coexistence" is a groundbreaking program that grew from the joint initiative and conference sponsored by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, Harvard University, and the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. Imagine Coexistence seeks to enhance prospects for coexistence and break the destructive cycles of intergroup violence. This important book, Imagine Coexistence— which was named for the program— offers a unique perspective grounded in research and outlines the invaluable lessons learned from numerous war-torn societies. The authors address the common problems that the people of these devastated nations face when the conflict subsides and examine how initiatives in education, the arts, sports, and economic development can offer refugees, returnees, and other survivors of group conflict reasons to work together and can create a base for relating constructively over time. "Imagine Coexistence" shows how creating situations for people from previously warring groups to work side by side or in parallel efforts toward common goals can be effective starting points for fostering coexistence. The book is filled with illustrative examples from violent ethnic conflicts such as those that occurred in Bosnia-Herzegovina and Rwanda that show the scope of actual efforts undertaken by the "Imagine Coexistence" project. The essays included in this volume synthesize and assess the relevant approaches to coexistence and outline the obstacles that often thwart these efforts. The authors also provide concrete examples of how coexistence efforts can be mainstreamed in rebuilding a war-torn society. "Imagine Coexistence" shows what is needed to sow the seeds of hope anywhere people have undergone the devastation of an ethnic conflict.
Release