Illegal People

How Globalization Creates Migration and Criminalizes Immigrants

Author: David Bacon

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 9780807042267

Category: Law

Page: 261

View: 1846

Argues that the labor and trade policies of the United States have created conditions that easily displace communities and cause migration to occur.
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The Right to Stay Home

How US Policy Drives Mexican Migration

Author: David Bacon

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807001627

Category: Social Science

Page: 328

View: 4138

The story of the growing resistance of Mexican communities to the poverty that forces people to migrate to the United States People across Mexico are being forced into migration, and while 11 percent of that country’s population lives north of the US border, the decision to migrate is rarely voluntary. Free trade agreements and economic policies that exacerbate and reinforce extreme wealth disparities make it impossible for Mexicans to make a living at home. And yet when they migrate to the United States, they must grapple with criminalization, low wages, and exploitation. In The Right to Stay Home, journalist David Bacon tells the story of the growing resistance of Mexican communities. Bacon shows how immigrant communities are fighting back—envisioning a world in which migration isn’t forced by poverty or environmental destruction and people are guaranteed the “right to stay home.” This richly detailed and comprehensive portrait of immigration reveals how the interconnected web of labor, migration, and the global economy unites farmers, migrant workers, and union organizers across borders. In addition to incisive reporting, eleven narratives are included, giving readers the chance to hear the voices of activists themselves as they reflect on their experiences, analyze the complexities of their realities, and affirm their vision for a better world.
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Globalization and Migration

A World in Motion

Author: Eliot Dickinson

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 144225498X

Category: Political Science

Page: 196

View: 8507

Focusing on the intersection between globalization and migration, this powerful text traces a dynamic, contradictory process that has set the world in motion and incorporated millions of migrants into an economic market whose dimensions are unprecedented in human history. Eliot Dickinson emphasizes recent developments in global politics, such as the massive number of refugees from wars in the Middle East who are now seeking asylum in Europe; the “Fortress Europe” mentality illustrated on the Italian island of Lampedusa; the heart-wrenching humanitarian challenge of Mexican and Central American children arriving alone in the United States; and the effects of climate change and environmental destruction on international migration. Today, with the collaboration of compliant governments and elites in the peripheral countries of the Global South, multinational corporations continue to flout regulations, destroy the environment, and take advantage of the large number of displaced, unemployed workers. While globalization is eliminating barriers between countries and making it easier for goods and capital to move around the world, the industrialized countries of the Global North are simultaneously putting up barriers to people and making it harder for them to migrate. This timely and provocative book explains how we have arrived at this paradoxical point in history and critically examines why governments are enacting policies that protect borders instead of people.
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Blue Dreams

Korean Americans and the Los Angeles Riots

Author: Nancy ABELMANN,John Lie,Nancy Abelmann

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674020030

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 8197

No one will soon forget the image, blazed across the airwaves, of armed Korean Americans taking to the rooftops as their businesses went up in flames during the Los Angeles riots. Why Korean Americans? What stoked the wrath the riots unleashed against them? Blue Dreams is the first book to make sense of these questions, to show how Korean Americans, variously depicted as immigrant seekers after the American dream or as racist merchants exploiting African Americans, emerged at the crossroads of conflicting social reflections in the aftermath of the 1992 riots. The situation of Los Angeles's Korean Americans touches on some of the most vexing issues facing American society today: ethnic conflict, urban poverty, immigration, multiculturalism, and ideological polarization. Combining interviews and deft socio-historical analysis, Blue Dreams gives these problems a human face and at the same time clarifies the historical, political, and economic factors that render them so complex. In the lives and voices of Korean Americans, the authors locate a profound challenge to cherished assumptions about the United States and its minorities. Why did Koreans come to the United States? Why did they set up shop in poor inner-city neighborhoods? Are they in conflict with African Americans? These are among the many difficult questions the authors answer as they probe the transnational roots and diversity of Los Angeles's Korean Americans. Their work finally shows us in sharp relief and moving detail a community that, despite the blinding media focus brought to bear during the riots, has nonetheless remained largely silent and effectively invisible. An important corrective to the formulaic accounts that have pitted Korean Americans against African Americans, Blue Dreams places the Korean American story squarely at the center of national debates over race, class, culture, and community. Table of Contents: Preface The Los Angeles Riots, the Korean American Story Reckoning via the Riots Diaspora Formation: Modernity and Mobility Mapping the Korean Diaspora in Los Angeles Korean American Entrepreneurship American Ideologies on Trial Conclusion Notes References Index Reviews of this book: Blue Dreams--a poetic allusion to the clear blue sky that Koreans see as a symbol of freedom--is a welcome exploration by outsiders into the vexing and largely invisible Korean-American predicament in Los Angeles and the nation. [Abelmann and Lie 's] colorful interview subjects offer sharp observations. --K.W. Lee, Los Angeles Times Reviews of this book: An informed and thoughtful examination of Korean immigration to the United States since 1970...[Abelmann and Lie] show that even in a period as short as twenty-five years, there have been successive waves of differently motivated, differently resourced Korean immigrants, and their experiences and reactions have differed accordingly. --Michael Tonry, Times Literary Supplement Reviews of this book: [The authors'] transnational perspective is particularly effective for explicating Korean immigrants' behaviors, activities, and feelings...Interesting and readable. --Pyong Gap Min, American Journal of Sociology Reviews of this book: Beginning with a poetic book title, the authors recount in depth as to how the 'Blue Dreams' of the Korean-American merchants in East Los Angeles had shattered in the midst of [the] 1992 riot that turned out to be 'elusive dreams' in America...The book not only portrays the L.A. riot surrounding the Korean merchants, but also characterizes diaspora of the Koreans in America. The authors have also examined with scholarly insights the more complex socioeconomic and political underplay the Koreans encountered in their 'Promised New Land'. --Eugene C. Kim, International Migration Review
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Lakota Culture, World Economy

Author: Kathleen Ann Pickering

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803287792

Category: Social Science

Page: 179

View: 2636

Workers both in and out of the home, small business owners, federal and tribal government employees, and unemployed and underemployed Lakotas speak about how they cope with living in communities that are in many ways marginalized by the modern world economy. The work uses interviews with residents of the Pine Ridge and Rosebud Reservations.
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Crossing Into America

The New Literature of Immigration

Author: Louis Gerard Mendoza,Subramanian Shankar

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781565848955

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 365

View: 734

Collects writings by such top contributors as Jamaica Kincaid, Maxine Hong Kingston, and Richard Rodriguez, as well as a host of new writers, to present a history of modern immigration and reflections on the immigrant experience.
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Migrants to the Metropolis

The Rise of Immigrant Gateway Cities

Author: Marie Price,Lisa Benton-Short

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN: 9780815631866

Category: Social Science

Page: 428

View: 8697

A collection of essays examining contemporary global immigration trends and their profound effect on specific host cities. It provides a global portrait of accelerating, worldwide immigration driven by income differentials, social networks, and various state policies that recruit skilled and unskilled laborers.
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Spaces of Conflict, Sounds of Solidarity

Music, Race, and Spatial Entitlement in Los Angeles

Author: Gaye Theresa Johnson

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520275284

Category: History

Page: 233

View: 5326

In Spaces of Conflict, Sounds of Solidarity, Gaye Theresa Johnson examines interracial anti-racist alliances, divisions among aggrieved minority communities, and the cultural expressions and spatial politics that emerge from the mutual struggles of Blacks and Chicanos in Los Angeles from the 1940s to the present. Johnson argues that struggles waged in response to institutional and social repression have created both moments and movements in which Blacks and Chicanos have unmasked power imbalances, sought recognition, and forged solidarities by embracing the strategies, cultures, and politics of each others' experiences. At the center of this study is the theory of spatial entitlement: the spatial strategies and vernaculars utilized by working class youth to resist the demarcations of race and class that emerged in the postwar era. In this important new book, Johnson reveals how racial alliances and antagonisms between Blacks and Chicanos in L.A. had spatial as well as racial dimensions.
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Strange Future

Pessimism and the 1992 Los Angeles Riots

Author: Min Hyoung Song

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822387492

Category: Social Science

Page: 300

View: 6553

Sometime near the start of the 1990s, the future became a place of national decline. The United States had entered a period of great anxiety fueled by the shrinking of the white middle class, the increasingly visible misery of poor urban blacks, and the mass immigration of nonwhites. Perhaps more than any other event marking the passage through these dark years, the 1992 Los Angeles riots have sparked imaginative and critical works reacting to this profound pessimism. Focusing on a wide range of these creative works, Min Hyoung Song shows how the L.A. riots have become a cultural-literary event—an important reference and resource for imagining the social problems plaguing the United States and its possible futures. Song considers works that address the riots and often the traumatic place of the Korean American community within them: the independent documentary Sa-I-Gu (Korean for April 29, the date the riots began), Chang-rae Lee’s novel Native Speaker, the commercial film Strange Days, and the experimental drama of Anna Deavere Smith, among many others. He describes how cultural producers have used the riots to examine the narrative of national decline, manipulating language and visual elements, borrowing and refashioning familiar tropes, and, perhaps most significantly, repeatedly turning to metaphors of bodily suffering to convey a sense of an unraveling social fabric. Song argues that these aesthetic experiments offer ways of revisiting the traumas of the past in order to imagine more survivable futures.
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Undocumented

How Immigration Became Illegal

Author: Aviva Chomsky

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807001686

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 5268

Explores what it means to be undocumented in a legal, social, economic and historical context In this illuminating work, immigrant rights activist Aviva Chomsky shows how “illegality” and “undocumentedness” are concepts that were created to exclude and exploit. With a focus on US policy, she probes how people, especially Mexican and Central Americans, have been assigned this status—and to what ends. Blending history with human drama, Chomsky explores what it means to be undocumented in a legal, social, economic, and historical context. The result is a powerful testament of the complex, contradictory, and ever-shifting nature of status in America. From the Trade Paperback edition.
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Police, Power, and the Production of Racial Boundaries

Author: Ana Muñiz

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 081356977X

Category: Law

Page: 154

View: 5951

Based on five years of ethnography, archival research, census data analysis, and interviews, Police, Power, and the Production of Racial Boundaries reveals how the LAPD, city prosecutors, and business owners struggled to control who should be considered “dangerous” and how they should be policed in Los Angeles. Sociologist Ana Muñiz shows how these influential groups used policies and everyday procedures to criminalize behaviors commonly associated with blacks and Latinos and to promote an exceedingly aggressive form of policing. Muñiz illuminates the degree to which the definitions of “gangs” and “deviants” are politically constructed labels born of public policy and court decisions, offering an innovative look at the process of criminalization and underscoring the ways in which a politically powerful coalition can define deviant behavior. As she does so, Muñiz also highlights the various grassroots challenges to such policies and the efforts to call attention to their racist effects. Muñiz describes the fight over two very different methods of policing: community policing (in which the police and the community work together) and the “broken windows” or “zero tolerance” approach (which aggressively polices minor infractions—such as loitering—to deter more serious crime). Police, Power, and the Production of Racial Boundaries also explores the history of the area to explain how Cadillac-Corning became viewed by outsiders as a “violent neighborhood” and how the city’s first gang injunction—a restraining order aimed at alleged gang members—solidified this negative image. As a result, Muñiz shows, Cadillac-Corning and other sections became a test site for repressive practices that eventually spread to the rest of the city.
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Presente!

[email protected] Immigrant Voices in the Struggle for Racial Justice / Voces Inmigranted [email protected] en la Lucha por la Justicia Racial

Author: Cristina Tzintzœn,Arnulfo Manr’quez,Carlos PŽrez de Alejo

Publisher: AK Press

ISBN: 1849351678

Category: Social Science

Page: 270

View: 3612

Documenting the undocumented: voices of immigrant workers.
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International Migration in the Age of Crisis and Globalization

Historical and Recent Experiences

Author: Andrés Solimano

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139490214

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 240

View: 7118

The international mobility of people and elites is a main feature of the global economy of today. Immigration augments the labor force in receiving countries and provides many of the bodies and minds that are essential to any vibrant economy. This book is based on a blend of theory, varied country examples, and rich historical material ranging from the mid-nineteenth century to the early twenty-first century. It discusses the conceptual underpinnings of the push and pull factors of current migration waves and their impacts for development on the source and receiving countries. The analysis reviews the historical context under which various migration experiences have taken place - both in periods of internationalism and nationalism - in order to contribute to debates on the desirability of and tensions and costs involved in the current process of international migration.
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The Death of Josseline

Immigration Stories from the Arizona Borderlands

Author: Margaret Regan

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807095435

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 5539

Dispatches from Arizona—the front line of a massive human migration—including the voices of migrants, Border Patrol, ranchers, activists, and others For the last decade, Margaret Regan has reported on the escalating chaos along the Arizona-Mexico border, ground zero for immigration since 2000. Undocumented migrants cross into Arizona in overwhelming numbers, a state whose anti-immigrant laws are the most stringent in the nation. And Arizona has the highest number of migrant deaths. Fourteen-year-old Josseline, a young girl from El Salvador who was left to die alone on the migrant trail, was just one of thousands to perish in its deserts and mountains. With a sweeping perspective and vivid on-the-ground reportage, Regan tells the stories of the people caught up in this international tragedy. Traveling back and forth across the border, she visits migrants stranded in Mexican shelters and rides shotgun with Border Patrol agents in Arizona, hiking with them for hours in the scorching desert; she camps out in the thorny wilderness with No More Deaths activists and meets with angry ranchers and vigilantes. Using Arizona as a microcosm, Regan explores a host of urgent issues: the border militarization that threatens the rights of U.S. citizens, the environmental damage wrought by the border wall, the desperation that compels migrants to come north, and the human tragedy of the unidentified dead in Arizona’s morgues. From the Trade Paperback edition.
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Making People Illegal

What Globalization Means for Migration and Law

Author: Catherine Dauvergne

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521895081

Category: Law

Page: 216

View: 3031

Making People Illegal evaluates why migration law in the twenty-first century is markedly different from even the recent past, and argues that this is a harbinger of paradigm shift in the rule of law."--BOOK JACKET.
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The Children of NAFTA

Labor Wars on the U.S./Mexico Border

Author: David Bacon

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520237781

Category: History

Page: 348

View: 1029

This is a journalistic chronicle of contemporary labor wars and organizing on the United States/Mexican border. Based on gripping firsthand reports, this book investigates the impact of the North American Free Trade Agreement on those who labor in the agricultural fields and maquiladora factories on the border.
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If We Can Win Here

The New Front Lines of the Labor Movement

Author: Fran Quigley

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801456134

Category: Political Science

Page: 240

View: 1877

Do service-sector workers represent the future of the U.S. labor movement? Mid-twentieth-century union activism transformed manufacturing jobs from backbreaking, low-wage work into careers that allowed workers to buy homes and send their kids to college. Some union activists insist that there is no reason why service-sector workers cannot follow that same path. In If We Can Win Here, Fran Quigley tells the stories of janitors, fry cooks, and health care aides trying to fight their way to middle-class incomes in Indianapolis. He also chronicles the struggles of the union organizers with whom the workers have made common cause. The service-sector workers of Indianapolis mirror the city's demographics: they are white, African American, and Latino. In contrast, the union organizers are mostly white and younger than the workers they help rally. Quigley chronicles these allies’ setbacks, victories, bonds, and conflicts while placing their journey in the broader context of the global economy and labor history. As one Indiana-based organizer says of the struggle being waged in a state that has earned a reputation as antiunion: "If we can win here, we can win anywhere." The outcome of the battle of Indianapolis may foretell the fate of workers across the United States.
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Communities Without Borders

Images and Voices from the World of Migration

Author: David Bacon

Publisher: Ilr Press

ISBN: 9780801473074

Category: Photography

Page: 235

View: 3832

In his stunning work of photojournalism and oral history, Bacon documents the new reality of the migrant experience: the creation of transnational communities. 148 halftones.
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Creating Aztlán

Chicano Art, Indigenous Sovereignty, and Lowriding Across Turtle Island

Author: Dylan Miner

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 0816530033

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 1118

"Creating Aztlâan interrogates the important role of Aztlâan in Chicano and Indigenous art and culture. Using the idea that lowriding is an Indigenous way of being, author Dylan A. T. Miner (Mâetis) discusses the multiple roles that Aztlâan has played atvarious moments in time, engaging pre-colonial indigeneities, alongside colonial, modern, and contemporary Xicano responses to colonization"--
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"They Take Our Jobs!"

And 20 Other Myths about Immigration

Author: Aviva Chomsky

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 9780807041567

Category: Social Science

Page: 236

View: 6267

Debunks a variety of myths surrounding the subject of immigration and immigrants in the United States, covering the economy, the law, race, and government policies.
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