The Humor Prism in 20th-century America

Author: Joseph Boskin

Publisher: Wayne State University Press

ISBN: 9780814325971

Category: History

Page: 268

View: 9195

The Humor Prism in Twentieth-Century America explores to what extent and in what ways American humor in the twentieth century reflects history.
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Poverty Knowledge

Social Science, Social Policy, and the Poor in Twentieth-Century U.S. History

Author: Alice O'Connor

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400824745

Category: History

Page: 392

View: 5900

Progressive-era "poverty warriors" cast poverty in America as a problem of unemployment, low wages, labor exploitation, and political disfranchisement. In the 1990s, policy specialists made "dependency" the issue and crafted incentives to get people off welfare. Poverty Knowledge gives the first comprehensive historical account of the thinking behind these very different views of "the poverty problem," in a century-spanning inquiry into the politics, institutions, ideologies, and social science that shaped poverty research and policy. Alice O'Connor chronicles a transformation in the study of poverty, from a reform-minded inquiry into the political economy of industrial capitalism to a detached, highly technical analysis of the demographic and behavioral characteristics of the poor. Along the way, she uncovers the origins of several controversial concepts, including the "culture of poverty" and the "underclass." She shows how such notions emerged not only from trends within the social sciences, but from the central preoccupations of twentieth-century American liberalism: economic growth, the Cold War against communism, the changing fortunes of the welfare state, and the enduring racial divide. The book details important changes in the politics and organization as well as the substance of poverty knowledge. Tracing the genesis of a still-thriving poverty research industry from its roots in the War on Poverty, it demonstrates how research agendas were subsequently influenced by an emerging obsession with welfare reform. Over the course of the twentieth century, O'Connor shows, the study of poverty became more about altering individual behavior and less about addressing structural inequality. The consequences of this steady narrowing of focus came to the fore in the 1990s, when the nation's leading poverty experts helped to end "welfare as we know it." O'Connor shows just how far they had traveled from their field's original aims.
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American Culture, American Tastes

Social Change and the 20th Century

Author: Michael Kammen

Publisher: Knopf

ISBN: 0307827712

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 5450

Americans have a long history of public arguments about taste, the uses of leisure, and what is culturally appropriate in a democracy that has a strong work ethic. Michael Kammen surveys these debates as well as our changing taste preferences, especially in the past century, and the shifting perceptions that have accompanied them. Professor Kammen shows how the post-traditional popular culture that flourished after the 1880s became full-blown mass culture after World War II, in an era of unprecedented affluence and travel. He charts the influence of advertising and opinion polling; the development of standardized products, shopping centers, and mass-marketing; the separation of youth and adult culture; the gradual repudiation of the genteel tradition; and the commercialization of organized entertainment. He stresses the significance of television in the shaping of mass culture, and of consumerism in its reconfiguration over the past two decades. Focusing on our own time, Kammen discusses the use of the fluid nature of cultural taste to enlarge audiences and increase revenues, and reveals how the public role of intellectuals and cultural critics has declined as the power of corporate sponsors and promoters has risen. As a result of this diminution of cultural authority, he says, definitive pronouncements have been replaced by divergent points of view, and there is, as well, a tendency to blur fact and fiction, reality and illusion. An important commentary on the often conflicting ways Americans have understood, defined, and talked about their changing culture in the twentieth century.
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What's So Funny?

Humor in American Culture

Author: Nancy A. Walker

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780842026888

Category: History

Page: 284

View: 8436

Presents studies attempting to define and dissect American humor for students and scholars.
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All Joking Aside

American Humor and Its Discontents

Author: Rebecca Krefting

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 1421414295

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 9143

Includes filmographies and discographies.
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Music and Social Movements

Mobilizing Traditions in the Twentieth Century

Author: Ron Eyerman,Andrew Jamison

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139936263

Category: Social Science

Page: N.A

View: 9322

Building on their studies of sixties culture and theory of cognitive praxis, Ron Eyerman and Andrew Jamison examine the mobilization of cultural traditions and formulation of new collective identities through the music of activism. They combine a sophisticated theoretical argument with historical-empirical studies of nineteenth-century populists and twentieth-century labour and ethnic movements, focusing on the interrelations between music and social movements in the United States and the transfer of those experiences to Europe. Specific chapters examine folk and country music, black music, music of the 1960s movements, and music of the Swedish progressive movement. This highly readable book is among the first to link the political sociology of social movements to cultural theory.
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American Humor

Author: Arthur Power Dudden

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0195050541

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 161

View: 3133

These essays take a close look at American humor from revolutionary times to the present, focusing in particular on the neglected trends of the past fifty years.
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Reform and reaction in twentieth century American politics

Author: John J. Broesamle

Publisher: Greenwood Pub Group

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 481

View: 7765

By employing historical examples and resurveying the chronological territory chapter by chapter, the study details the development and decline of liberal reform movements and focuses on the similarities between eras of reform and reactionary phases and the interrelationship of reform movements over the decades.
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Humour, Comedy and Laughter

Obscenities, Paradoxes, Insights and the Renewal of Life

Author: Lidia Dina Sciama

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 1782385436

Category: Social Science

Page: 220

View: 6611

Anthropological writings on humor are not very numerous or extensive, but they do contain a great deal of insight into the diverse mental and social processes that underlie joking and laughter. On the basis of a wide range of ethnographic and textual materials, the chapters examine the cognitive, social, and moral aspects of humor and its potential to bring about a sense of amity and mutual understanding, even among different and possibly hostile people. Unfortunately, though, cartoons, jokes, and parodies can cause irremediable distress and offence. Nevertheless, contributors' cross-cultural evidence confirms that the positive aspects of humor far outweigh the danger of deepening divisions and fueling hostilities
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We Make the Road by Walking

Conversations on Education and Social Change

Author: Myles Horton,Paulo Freire,Brenda Bell,John Gaventa

Publisher: Temple University Press

ISBN: 9780877227755

Category: Education

Page: 256

View: 4870

This dialogue between two of the most prominent thinkers on social change in the twentieth century was certainly a meeting of giants. Throughout their highly personal conversations recorded here, Horton and Freire discuss the nature of social change and empowerment and their individual literacy campaigns.
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Suntanning in 20th Century America

Author: Kerry Segrave

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786423943

Category: Social Science

Page: 216

View: 5142

The suntan experienced a profound change in the last century. Considered a mark of the lower class for hundreds of years, tanning became a fad in the early 1920s and remains popular today. The tan, though, was much more thana matter of fashion,enjoying at first a boost from the medical establishment. Opinions ranging from hard science to quackery lauded the suntan as something of a panacea. Near the end of World War II, however, researchers increasingly warned against the hazards of overexposure to the sun, and a large new industry developed--sunscreen. Americans' current paradoxical obsession with the tan developed almost entirely from the conflicting rays of twentieth century thought. This history examines the twentieth century suntan as a social and scientific phenomenon. Beginning with the years 1900-1920, it debunks the myth that changing attitudes toward the tan sprang largely from the world of fashion. Initial pro-tanning medical hype, emerging negative opinions of sunbathing near the middle of the century, the development of sunscreens, the debate over sunscreen efficacy, and the sunless tan are all covered here. Numerous pictures demonstrate changing perceptions of the suntan, displaying advertisements for products that promoted, prevented or healed tans.
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The Comedians

Drunks, Thieves, Scoundrels, and the History of American Comedy

Author: Kliph Nesteroff

Publisher: Open Road + Grove/Atlantic

ISBN: 0802190863

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 432

View: 3695

In The Comedians, comedy historian Kliph Nesteroff brings to life a century of American comedy with real-life characters, forgotten stars, mainstream heroes and counterculture iconoclasts. Based on over two hundred original interviews and extensive archival research, Nesteroff’s groundbreaking work is a narrative exploration of the way comedians have reflected, shaped, and changed American culture over the past one hundred years. Starting with the vaudeville circuit at the turn of the last century, Nesteroff introduces the first stand-up comedian—an emcee who abandoned physical shtick for straight jokes. After the repeal of Prohibition, Mafia-run supper clubs replaced speakeasies, and mobsters replaced vaudeville impresarios as the comedian’s primary employer. In the 1950s, the late-night talk show brought stand-up to a wide public, while Lenny Bruce, Mort Sahl, and Jonathan Winters attacked conformity and staged a comedy rebellion in coffeehouses. From comedy’s part in the Civil Rights movement and the social upheaval of the late 1960s, to the first comedy clubs of the 1970s and the cocaine-fueled comedy boom of the 1980s, The Comedians culminates with a new era of media-driven celebrity in the twenty-first century.
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Encyclopedia of 20th-century American Humor

Author: Alleen Pace Nilsen,Don Lee Fred Nilsen

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: N.A

Category: Humor

Page: 360

View: 6804

"This unique encyclopedia treats the concepts, persons, themes, and media of 20th-century American humor and humor studies. More than 100 alphabetically arranged entries highlight a broad range of humor-related topics from wit, understatement, and ambiguity to late-night talk shows and the Internet."--"Outstanding Reference Sources," American Libraries, May 2001.
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Comic Book Nation

The Transformation of Youth Culture in America

Author: Bradford W. Wright

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801874505

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 2290

Portrays the role of comic books in shaping American youth and pop culture, from Batman's struggles with corrupt politicians during the Depression to Iron Man's Cold War battles.
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Raising America

Experts, Parents, and a Century of Advice About Children

Author: Ann Hulbert

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307773396

Category: Social Science

Page: 464

View: 9464

Since the beginning of the twentieth century, millions of anxious parents have turned to child-rearing manuals for reassurance. Instead, however, they have often found yet more cause for worry. In this rich social history, Ann Hulbert analyzes one hundred years of shifting trends in advice and discovers an ongoing battle between two main approaches: a “child-centered” focus on warmly encouraging development versus a sterner “parent-centered” emphasis on instilling discipline. She examines how pediatrics, psychology, and neuroscience have fueled the debates but failed to offer definitive answers. And she delves into the highly relevant and often turbulent personal lives of the popular advice-givers, from L. Emmett Holt and Arnold Gesell to Bruno Bettelheim and Benjamin Spock to the prominent (and ever conflicting) experts of today. From the Trade Paperback edition.
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Funny Ladies

The New Yorker's Greatest Women Cartoonists and Their Cartoons

Author: Liza Donnelly

Publisher: Prometheus Books

ISBN: 1615923888

Category: Art

Page: 217

View: 4496

It's no secret that most New Yorker readers flip through the magazine to look at the cartoons before they ever lay eyes on a word of the text. But what isn't generally known is that over the decades a growing cadre of women artists have contributed to the witty, memorable cartoons that readers look forward to each week. Now Liza Donnelly, herself a renowned cartoonist with the New Yorker for more than twenty years, has written this wonderful, in-depth celebration of women cartoonists who have graced the pages of the famous magazine from the Roaring Twenties to the present day.An anthology of funny, poignant, and entertaining cartoons, biographical sketches, and social history all in one, Funny Ladies offers a unique slant on 20th-century and early 21st-century America through the humorous perspectives of the talented women who have captured in pictures and captions many of the key social issues of their time. As someone who understands firsthand the cartoonist's art, Donnelly is in a position to offer distinctive insights on the creative process, the relationships between artists and editors, what it means to be a female cartoonist, and the personalities of the other New Yorker women cartoonists, whom she has known over the years.Funny Ladies reveals never-before-published material from The New Yorker archives, including correspondence from Harold Ross, Katharine White, and many others. In addition, Donnelly has interviewed all of the living female cartoonists, many of their male counterparts, and editors and writers: David Remnick, Roger Angell, Lee Lorenz, Harriet Walden (legendary editor Harold Ross's secretary), Bob Mankoff, Eldon Dedini, Dana Fradon, Frank Model, Bob Weber, Sam Gross, Gahan Wilson, Joe Farris, among others.Combining a wealth of information with an engaging and charming narrative, plus more than seventy cartoons, along with photographs and self-portraits of the cartoonists, Funny Ladies beautifully portrays the art and contributions of the brilliant female cartoonists in America's greatest magazine.Liza Donnelly (Rhinebeck, NY) has been a cartoonist for The New Yorker for twenty-two years. When she started, she was one of only three women cartoonists being published by the magazine at that time. Ms. Donnelly has written and illustrated a series of children's books about dinosaurs and has edited four collections of cartoons, including Mothers and Daughters, and, with Michael Maslin, Fathers and Sons, Husbands and Wives, and Call Me When You Reach Nirvana. She has also contributed cartoons and illustrations to The New York Times, The Nation, Cosmopolitan, and many other national magazines.
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Linguistics and the Study of Comics

Author: F. Bramlett

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 113700410X

Category: Social Science

Page: 310

View: 8656

Do Irish superheroes actually sound Irish? Why are Gary Larson's Far Side cartoons funny? How do political cartoonists in India, Turkey, and the US get their point across? These questions and many more are answered in this new collection on linguistics and comics, which explores language and how the verbal and the visual interact.
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Fred Allen's Radio Comedy

Author: Alan Havig

Publisher: Temple University Press

ISBN: 1439905606

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 296

View: 3252

"A notable example of radio at its best." --Back Stage/SHOOT In 1954, James Thurber wrote: "You can count on the thumb of one hand the American who is at once a comedian, a humorist, a wit, and a satirist, and his name is Fred Allen." Several decades after his death and more than forty years since his radio program left the air, Fred Allen's reputation as a respected humorist remains intact. In this book, Alan Havig explores the roots of his comedy, the themes it exploited, the problems and challenges that faced the radio comedy writer, and Allen's unique success with the one-dimensional medium of radio. Tracing a career that lasted from 1912 into the 1950s and encompassed vaudeville, Broadway revues, movies, radio, and television, Havig describes the "verbal slapstick" style that was Fred Allen's hallmark and legacy to American comedy. More than a biography of Fred Allen, this is a study of the development of the radio industry, a discussion of American humor, and the story of how one relates to the other. Using a wide variety of published and unpublished sources, including the Allen Papers, Havig analyzes Allen's radio comedy of the 1930s and 40s within the context of the peculiar advantages and limitations of radio as a medium for comedy. He argues that Allen did not merely transfer vaudeville routines to a non-visual medium as did Eddie Cantor, Ed Wynn, and others. Allen developed a comedic style that depended on word play, sound effects, and on his audience's ability and readiness to imagine a visual world in which his eccentric characters operated. Havig illustrates his story with numerous examples of Allen's humor, with fascinating anecdotes, and excerpts from radio broadcasts. In accounting for the comedian's success, he deals with vaudeville, comedy writing, sponsor's demands and censorship of material, and the organizational world of radio broadcasting companies. Describing radio as "an instrument of wit," Fred Allen wrote: "on radio you could do subtle writing because you had access to the imagination...that was why I liked radio. we had some fun." Readers will also have some fun remembering or discovering for the first time Allen's Alley and the magic of radio comedy in its prime. "Fred was one of the greatest of vaudeville and radio comedians. Anyone even casually concerned with the state of American humor will be well advised to give his work, as Mr. Havig presents it, careful study." --Steve Allen "Alan Havig has done an intelligent, careful and exhaustive research job. This is a well-written, solid performance-biography." --J. Fred MacDonald, Curator of the Museum of Broadcast Communication, Chicago
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