How the Other Half Lives - Studies Among the Tenements of New York

Author: Jacob A. Riis

Publisher: Read Books Ltd

ISBN: 1528785940

Category: Social Science

Page: 238

View: 1854

Classic Books Library presents this brand new edition of "How the Other Half Lives" (1890) by Jacob Riis. This powerful collection of photographs depicts the slums of New York during the 1800s. As an émigré, Riis witnessed the poverty and crowded conditions of the city, and turned to photojournalism to document street life. Mastering the innovative use of flash, and being one of the first to use the technology in photographic practice in America, Riis produced starkly honest and evocative images of the tenements. Riis (1849-1914) was a journalist and social documentary photographer born in Denmark. He emigrated to New York as a young man and became part of a large wave of immigrants that settled there in the late 1800s. After initially training as a carpenter, his journalistic career began when he was appointed as a trainee at the New York News Association. Later, Riis developed an interest in photography as a way to further illustrate the conditions of city slums that featured in his reports, and his first collaborative photojournalism work was published in 1888.
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How the Other Half Lives

Studies Among the Tenements of New York

Author: Jacob Riis

Publisher: Applewood Books

ISBN: 145850042X

Category: Social Science

Page: 322

View: 7644

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How the Other Half Lives

Studies Among the Tenements of New York

Author: Jacob August Riis

Publisher: Dover Publications

ISBN: 0486220125

Category: History

Page: 233

View: 8588

This famous journalistic record of the filth and degradation of New York's slums at the turn of the century is a classic in social thought and a monument of early American photography. Captured on film by photographer, journalist, and reformer Jacob Riis, more than 100 grim scenes reveal man's struggle to survive.
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Sustainable Fashion

Past, Present and Future

Author: Jennifer Farley Gordon,Colleen Hill

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 085785187X

Category: Design

Page: 264

View: 6464

Sustainable Fashion provides a unique and accessible overview of fashion ethics and sustainability issues of the past, present and future. This book is the first to situate today's eco-fashion movement in its multifaceted historical context, investigating the relationship between fashion and the environment as far back as the early nineteenth century. Employing an expanded definition of sustainability that also considers ethical issues, Farley Gordon and Hill explore each stage of the fashion production cycle, from the cultivation of raw fibers to the shipment of the finished garment. Structured thematically, each of the six chapters is dedicated to the discussion of one major issue, from recycling and repurposing to labor practices and the treatment of animals. Including interviews with eco-fashion designers, Sustainable Fashion will appeal to students and scholars of fashion, as well as students of design, history and cultural studies.
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Maggie: A Girl of the Streets

Author: Stephen Crane

Publisher: Broadview Press

ISBN: 9781551115979

Category: Fiction

Page: 200

View: 3903

First published in 1893, when Stephen Crane was only twenty-one years old, Maggie is the harrowing tale of a young woman’s fall into prostitution and destitution in New York City’s notorious Bowery slum. In dazzlingly vivid prose and with a sexual candour remarkable for his day, Crane depicts an urban sub-culture awash with alcohol and patrolled by the swaggering gangland “tough.” Presented here with its companion piece George’s Mother and a selection of Crane’s other Bowery stories, this edition of Maggie includes a detailed introduction that places the novel in its social, cultural, and literary contexts. The appendices provide an unrivalled range of documentary sources covering such topics as religious and civic reform writing, slum fiction, the “new journalism,” and literary realism and naturalism. An up-to-date bibliography of scholarly work on Crane is also included.
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Der unsichtbare Mann

Roman

Author: Ralph Ellison

Publisher: Aufbau Digital

ISBN: 3841216978

Category: Fiction

Page: 688

View: 7931

„Einer der bedeutendsten Autoren der amerikanischen Nachkriegsliteratur.“ Paul Ingendaay, F.A.Z. Ralph Ellison ist neben Toni Morrison und James Baldwin eine der großen Stimmen des afroamerikanischen Romans der Gegenwart. Sein Meisterwerk zeugt von künstlerischer Kraft und ist hochaktuell – als schonungslose Abrechnung mit den alltäglichen rassistischen Ideologien und Verhaltensweisen und als Lob auf das gewachsene Selbstbewusstsein der noch immer um ihre selbstverständlichen Rechte Kämpfenden: Der namenlose Ich-Erzähler verliert sein Stipendium, weil er einem Förderer des von Weißen eingerichteten Südstaaten-Colleges für Schwarze nicht die gewünschte Kulisse, sondern die Realität der Farbigen vor Augen führt. Er muss sein Glück dort suchen, wo es Arbeit gibt, und landet in Harlem, einem brodelnden Hexenkessel, inmitten von schwarzem Glamour und Blue Notes, Swing und Spirituals, politischen Aufwieglern, gerissenen Gaunern und verlorenen Spinnern.
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Gateway to the Promised Land

Ethnic Cultures on New York's Lower East Side

Author: Mario Maffi

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814755099

Category: History

Page: 343

View: 6135

This essential reference book is must reading for mental health professionals who assess and treat children and adolescents. Comprehensive, detailed, clearly written, and innovative, it presents the approaches of the leading clinicians in their fields.
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Photography’s Other Histories

Author: Christopher Pinney,Nicolas Peterson,Nicholas Thomas

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822331131

Category: Photography

Page: 286

View: 7204

Richly illustrated with over 100 images, this volume explores the role of photography in raising historical consciousness from a variety of geographic, cultural, and historical perspectives. 128 photos.
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A Companion to American Art

Author: John Davis,Jennifer A. Greenhill,Jason D. LaFountain

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118542495

Category: Art

Page: 680

View: 1932

A Companion to American Art presents 35newly-commissioned essays by leading scholars that explore themethodology, historiography, and current state of the field ofAmerican art history. Features contributions from a balance of established andemerging scholars, art and architectural historians, and otherspecialists Includes several paired essays to emphasize dialogue and debatebetween scholars on important contemporary issues in American arthistory Examines topics such as the methodological stakes in thewriting of American art history, changing ideas about whatconstitutes “Americanness,” and the relationship of artto public culture Offers a fascinating portrait of the evolution and currentstate of the field of American art history and suggests futuredirections of scholarship
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Practicing Religion in the Age of the Media

Explorations in Media, Religion, and Culture

Author: Stewart M. Hoover,Lynn Schofield Clark

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231505213

Category: Religion

Page: 304

View: 9225

Increasingly, the religious practices people engage in and the ways they talk about what is meaningful or sacred take place in the context of media culture—in the realm of the so-called secular. Focusing on this intersection of the sacred and the secular, this volume gathers together the work of media experts, religious historians, sociologists of religion, and authorities on American studies and art history. Topics range from Islam on the Internet to the quasi-religious practices of Elvis fans, from the uses of popular culture by the Salvation Army in its early years to the uses of interactive media technologies at the Simon Wiesenthal Center's Beit Hashoah Museum of Tolerance. The issues that the essays address include the public/private divide, the distinctions between the sacred and profane, and how to distinguish between the practices that may be termed "religious" and those that may not.
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The Legalist Reformation

Law, Politics, and Ideology in New York, 1920-1980

Author: William E. Nelson

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807875562

Category: Law

Page: 472

View: 3666

Based on a detailed examination of New York case law, this pathbreaking book shows how law, politics, and ideology in the state changed in tandem between 1920 and 1980. Early twentieth-century New York was the scene of intense struggle between white, Anglo-Saxon, Protestant upper and middle classes located primarily in the upstate region and the impoverished, mainly Jewish and Roman Catholic, immigrant underclass centered in New York City. Beginning in the 1920s, however, judges such as Benjamin N. Cardozo, Henry J. Friendly, Learned Hand, and Harlan Fiske Stone used law to facilitate the entry of the underclass into the economic and social mainstream and to promote tolerance among all New Yorkers. Ultimately, says William Nelson, a new legal ideology was created. By the late 1930s, New Yorkers had begun to reconceptualize social conflict not along class lines but in terms of the power of majorities and the rights of minorities. In the process, they constructed a new approach to law and politics. Though doctrinal change began to slow by the 1960s, the main ambitions of the legalist reformation--liberty, equality, human dignity, and entrepreneurial opportunity--remain the aspirations of nearly all Americans, and of much of the rest of the world, today.
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A People s History of Poverty in America

Author: Stephen Pimpare

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN: 1595586962

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 6329

In this compulsively readable social history, political scientist Stephen Pimpare vividly describes poverty from the perspective of poor and welfare-reliant Americans from the big city to the rural countryside. He focuses on how the poor have created community, secured shelter, and found food and illuminates their battles for dignity and respect. Through prodigious archival research and lucid analysis, Pimpare details the ways in which charity and aid for the poor have been inseparable, more often than not, from the scorn and disapproval of those who would help them. In the rich and often surprising historical testimonies he has collected from the poor in America, Pimpare overturns any simple conclusions about how the poor see themselves or what it feels like to be poor—and he shows clearly that the poor are all too often aware that charity comes with a price. It is that price that Pimpare eloquently questions in this book, reminding us through powerful anecdotes, some heart-wrenching and some surprisingly humorous, that poverty is not simply a moral failure.
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In Pursuit of Right and Justice

Edward Weinfeld as Lawyer and Judge

Author: William E Nelson

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814758282

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 291

View: 2617

"His bond with the city mirrored his parents' relationship to their towns in the Old World, except that Manhatten offered him a future they could only imagine. Merely by working hard within a few square miles of New York, the young Weinfeld could become a great lawyer and ultimately a judge of national repute. Weinfeld's personal growth and socioeconomic mobility illustrates how the children of Catholic and Jewish immigrants were assimilated into mainstream American life during the course of the twentieth century. His unique approach to jurisprudence offers a model for the equal legal protection of all Americans."--BOOK JACKET.
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The Culture of Punishment

Prison, Society, and Spectacle

Author: Michelle Brown

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814799994

Category: Social Science

Page: 251

View: 4754

Analyzes social aspects of prison, covering various theories about the role and function of punishment in society in the United States, including how the culture of imprisonment carries over into everyday life through television shows, movies, prison tourism, and other avenues, and examines the negative impact of penal spectatorship.
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Unprotected Labor

Household Workers, Politics, and Middle-Class Reform in New York, 1870-1940

Author: Vanessa H. May

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807877905

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 7940

Through an analysis of women's reform, domestic worker activism, and cultural values attached to public and private space, Vanessa May explains how and why domestic workers, the largest category of working women before 1940, were excluded from labor protections that formed the foundation of the welfare state. Looking at the debate over domestic service from both sides of the class divide, Unprotected Labor assesses middle-class women's reform programs as well as household workers' efforts to determine their own working conditions. May argues that working-class women sought to define the middle-class home as a workplace even as employers and reformers regarded the home as private space. The result was that labor reformers left domestic workers out of labor protections that covered other women workers in New York between the late nineteenth century and the New Deal. By recovering the history of domestic workers as activists in the debate over labor legislation, May challenges depictions of domestics as passive workers and reformers as selfless advocates of working women. Unprotected Labor illuminates how the domestic-service debate turned the middle-class home inside out, making private problems public and bringing concerns like labor conflict and government regulation into the middle-class home.
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The Gift of the Face

Portraiture and Time in Edward S. Curtis's The North American Indian

Author: Shamoon Zamir

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469611767

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 300

Edward S. Curtis's The North American Indian is the most ambitious photographic and ethnographic record of Native American cultures ever produced. Published between 1907 and 1930 as a series of twenty volumes and portfolios, the work contains more than two thousand photographs intended to document the traditional culture of every Native American tribe west of the Mississippi. Many critics have claimed that Curtis's images present Native peoples as a "vanishing race," hiding both their engagement with modernity and the history of colonial violence. But in this major reappraisal of Curtis's work, Shamoon Zamir argues instead that Curtis's photography engages meaningfully with the crisis of culture and selfhood brought on by the dramatic transformations of Native societies. This crisis is captured profoundly, and with remarkable empathy, in Curtis's images of the human face. Zamir also contends that we can fully understand this achievement only if we think of Curtis's Native subjects as coauthors of his project. This radical reassessment is presented as a series of close readings that explore the relationship of aesthetics and ethics in photography. Zamir's richly illustrated study resituates Curtis's work in Native American studies and in the histories of photography and visual anthropology.
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