Hisat'sinom

Ancient Peoples in a Land Without Water

Author: Christian Eric Downum

Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the

ISBN: 9781934691120

Category: Social Science

Page: 164

View: 1057

When the Spanish conquistadors first came to northern Arizona, they proclaimed it the "sierra sin agua," mountains without water, because of the peculiar absence of rivers and streams. But this harsh, beautiful land below the snow-capped San Francisco Peaks has long nourished humans, including the ancestors of today's Hopis, the Hisatsinom. Showcasing new research from Wupatki, Sunset Crater, and Walnut Canyon, this book tells the story of the diverse, mobile, and adaptive peoples who inhabited this region and borrowed from their Ancestral Pueblo and Hohokam neighbors while maintaining distinctive styles of their own.
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The Hohokam millennium

Author: Suzanne K. Fish,Paul R. Fish

Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 154

View: 5420

For a thousand years they flourished in the arid lands now part of Arizona. They built extensive waterworks, ballcourts, and pyramids, made beautiful pottery and jewelry, and engaged in wide-ranging trade networks. Then, slowly, their civilization faded and trans-muted into something no longer Hohokam. Are today's Tohono O'odham their heirs or their conquerors? The mystery and the beauty of Hohokam civilization are the subjects of the essays in this volume. Written by archaeologists who have led the effort to excavate, record, and preserve the remnants of this ancient culture, the chapters illuminate the way the Hohokam organized their households and their communities, their sophisticated pottery and textiles, their irrigation system, the huge ballcourts and pyramids they built, and much more.
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Aztec, Salmon, and the Puebloan Heartland of the Middle San Juan

Author: Paul F. Reed,Gary M. Brown

Publisher: University of New Mexico Press

ISBN: 0826359930

Category: Social Science

Page: 184

View: 1026

Often overshadowed by the Ancestral Pueblo centers at Chaco Canyon and Mesa Verde, the Middle San Juan is one of the most dynamic territories in the pre-Hispanic Southwest, interacting with Chaco Canyon and Mesa Verde as well as the surrounding regions. This ancient Puebloan heartland was instrumental in tying together Chaco and Mesa Verde cultures to create a distinctive blend of old and new, local and nonlocal. The contributors to this book attribute the development of Salmon and Aztec to migration and colonization by people from Chaco Canyon. Rather than fighting for control over the territory, Chaco migrants and local leaders worked together to build the great houses of Aztec and Salmon while maintaining their identities and connections with their individual homelands. As a result of this collaboration, the Middle San Juan can be seen as one of the ancient Puebloan heartlands that made important contributions to contemporary Puebloan society.
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The Great Basin

People and Place in Ancient Times

Author: Catherine S. Fowler,Don D. Fowler

Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the

ISBN: 9781930618954

Category: History

Page: 166

View: 325

This book is about a place, the Great Basin of western North America, and about the lifeways of Native American people who lived there during the past 13,000 years. The authors highlight the ingenious solutions people devised to sustain themselves in a difficult environment. The Great Basin is a semiarid and often harsh land, but one with life-giving oases. As the weather fluctuated from year to year, and the climate from decade to decade or even from one millennium to the next, the availability of water, plants, and animals also fluctuated. Only people who learned the land intimately and could read the many signs of its changing moods were successful. The evidence of their success is often subtle and difficult to interpret from the few and fragile remains left behind for archaeologists to discover. These ancient fragments of food and baskets, hats and hunting decoys, traps and rock art and the lifeways they reflect are the subject of this well-illustrated book.
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Traveling Indian Arizona

Author: Anne Hughes O'Brien

Publisher: Big Earth Publishing

ISBN: 9781565795181

Category: Social Science

Page: 296

View: 7248

In collaboration with the Heard Museum, this book is a practical introduction to visiting Native American communities in Arizona. Covering the etiquette, present-day culture, traditions, and arts of contemporary Arizona's native inhabitants, tourists will be prepared to explore the heart of tribal populations. See how the twenty-one federally recognized tribal communities continue to evolve. Enjoy this rare invitation to sample the food, view the performing arts, and purchase the visual arts as you witness today's Native American cultural regeneration.
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Painting the Cosmos

Metaphor and Worldview in Images from the Southwest Pueblos and Mexico

Author: Robert G. Breunig

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780897341431

Category: Art

Page: 224

View: 1742

Painting the Cosmos presents current research on nearly two thousand years of ancestral Hopi painting and the values expressed in the imagery, settings, and performance contexts of paintings on kiva walls and pottery vessels. Nine essays show how continuity in Hopi values, such as reciprocity, humility, and hard work are expressed metaphorically in art, song, ritual activities, daily tasks, and visual arts. Many fundamentals of Hopi iconography (the study of images) are held in common with other Pueblos in New Mexico, with indigenous cultures of northwest Mexico, and with ancient Mesoamerican civilizations. In this region, histories, aesthetics, and values have common roots that are explored here through verbal and visual metaphors, past and present. This volume is richly illustrated in full color. Authors include Kelley Hays-Gilpin, Delbridge Honanie, Michael Kabotie, Lawrence Loendorf, Elizabeth Newsome, Polly Schaafsma, Emory Sekaquaptewa, Karl Taube, and Dorothy Washburn.
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An Archaeology of Doings

Secularism and the Study of Pueblo Religion

Author: Severin M. Fowles

Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the

ISBN: 9781934691564

Category: Social Science

Page: 306

View: 8675

"There is an unsettling paradox in the anthropology of religion. Modern understandings of "religion" emerged out of a specifically Western genealogy, and recognizing this, many anthropologists have become deeply suspicious of claims that such understandings can be applied with fidelity to premodern or non-Western contexts. And yet, archaeologists now write about "religion" and "ritual" with greater ease than ever, even though their deeply premodern and fully non-Western objects of study would seem to make the use of these concepts especially fraught. In this probing study, Severin Fowles challenges us to consider just what is at stake in archaeological reconstructions of an enchanted past. Focusing on the Ancestral Pueblo societies of the American Southwest, he provocatively argues that the Pueblos--prior to missionization--did not have a religion at all, but rather something else, something glossed in the indigenous vernacular as "doings." Fowles then outlines a new archaeology of doings that takes us far beyond the familiar terrain of premodern religion."--Publisher's website.
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The Book of Blank Pages

Author: Uno Sinom

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 1430308028

Category: Religion

Page: 144

View: 8528

Experience delight, experience the joy, enjoy the fun of who you really are! This is an experiential book that reveals your inner being. Enlightenment is something that happens to the mind. You are not your mind. This book has you experience what you are. Very, very, fun!
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A Refugee's Story

Author: Haroon Monis

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 1365398714

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 3442

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Old Indian Legends and A Warrior's Daughter

Author: Zitkala-Sa

Publisher: Library of Alexandria

ISBN: 1465559442

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 1313

IKTOMI is a spider fairy. He wears brown deerskin leggins with long soft fringes on either side, and tiny beaded moccasins on his feet. His long black hair is parted in the middle and wrapped with red, red bands. Each round braid hangs over a small brown ear and falls forward over his shoulders. He even paints his funny face with red and yellow, and draws big black rings around his eyes. He wears a deerskin jacket, with bright colored beads sewed tightly on it. Iktomi dresses like a real Dakota brave. In truth, his paint and deerskins are the best part of him—if ever dress is part of man or fairy. Iktomi is a wily fellow. His hands are always kept in mischief. He prefers to spread a snare rather than to earn the smallest thing with honest hunting. Why! he laughs outright with wide open mouth when some simple folk are caught in a trap, sure and fast. He never dreams another lives so bright as he. Often his own conceit leads him hard against the common sense of simpler people. Poor Iktomi cannot help being a little imp. And so long as he is a naughty fairy, he cannot find a single friend. No one helps him when he is in trouble. No one really loves him. Those who come to admire his handsome beaded jacket and long fringed leggins soon go away sick and tired of his vain, vain words and heartless laughter. Thus Iktomi lives alone in a cone-shaped wigwam upon the plain. One day he sat hungry within his teepee. Suddenly he rushed out, dragging after him his blanket. Quickly spreading it on the ground, he tore up dry tall grass with both his hands and tossed it fast into the blanket. Tying all the four corners together in a knot, he threw the light bundle of grass over his shoulder. Snatching up a slender willow stick with his free left hand, he started off with a hop and a leap. From side to side bounced the bundle on his back, as he ran light-footed over the uneven ground. Soon he came to the edge of the great level land. On the hilltop he paused for breath. With wicked smacks of his dry parched lips, as if tasting some tender meat, he looked straight into space toward the marshy river bottom. With a thin palm shading his eyes from the western sun, he peered far away into the lowlands, munching his own cheeks all the while. "Ah-ha!" grunted he, satisfied with what he saw. A group of wild ducks were dancing and feasting in the marshes. With wings outspread, tip to tip, they moved up and down in a large circle. Within the ring, around a small drum, sat the chosen singers, nodding their heads and blinking their eyes.
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Historical Atlases

The First Three Hundred Years, 1570-1870

Author: Walter Goffart

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226300719

Category: History

Page: 603

View: 4257

Today we can walk into any well-stocked bookstore or library and find an array of historical atlases. The first thorough review of the source material, Historical Atlases traces how these collections of "maps for history"—maps whose sole purpose was to illustrate some historical moment or scene—came into being. Beginning in the sixteenth century, and continuing down to the late nineteenth, Walter Goffart discusses milestones in the origins of historical atlases as well as individual maps illustrating historical events in alternating, paired chapters. He focuses on maps of the medieval period because the development of maps for history hinged particularly on portrayals of this segment of the postclassical, "modern" past. Goffart concludes the book with a detailed catalogue of more than 700 historical maps and atlases produced from 1570 to 1870. Historical Atlases will immediately take its place as the single most important reference on its subject. Historians of cartography, medievalists, and anyone seriously interested in the role of maps in portraying history will find it invaluable.
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A History of the Ancient Southwest

Author: Stephen H. Lekson

Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 439

View: 1065

According to archaeologist Stephen H. Lekson, much of what we think we know about the Southwest has been compressed into conventions and classifications and orthodoxies. This book challenges and reconfigures these accepted notions by telling two parallel stories, one about the development, personalities, and institutions of Southwestern archaeology and the other about interpretations of what actually happened in the ancient past. While many works would have us believe that nothing much ever happened in the ancient Southwest, this book argues that the region experienced rises and falls, kings and commoners, war and peace, triumphs and failures. In this view, Chaco Canyon was a geopolitical reaction to the "Colonial Period" Hohokam expansion and the Hohokam "Classic Period" was the product of refugee Chacoan nobles, chased off the Colorado Plateau by angry farmers. Far to the south, Casas Grandes was a failed attempt to create a Mesoamerican state, and modern Pueblo people--with societies so different from those at Chaco and Casas Grandes--deliberately rejected these monumental, hierarchical episodes of their past. From the publisher: The second printing of A History of the Ancient Southwest has corrected the errors noted below. SAR Press regrets an error on Page 72, paragraph 4 (also Page 275, note 2) regarding "absolute dates." "50,000 dates" was incorrectly published as "half a million dates." Also P. 125, lines 13-14: "Between 21,000 and 27,000 people lived there" should read "Between 2,100 and 2,700 people lived there."
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The Great Basin

A Natural Prehistory

Author: Donald Grayson

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520267478

Category: Nature

Page: 418

View: 5016

"The Great Basin, centering on Nevada and including substantial parts of California, Oregon, and Utah, gets its name from the fact that none of its rivers or streams flow to the sea. This book synthesizes the past 25,000 years of the natural history of this vast region. It explores the extinct animals that lived in the Great Basin during the Ice Age and recounts the rise and fall of the massive Ice Age lakes that existed here. It explains why trees once grew 13' beneath what is now the surface of Lake Tahoe, explores the nearly two dozen Great Basin mountain ranges that once held substantial glaciers, and tells the remarkable story of how pinyon pine came to cover some 17,000,000 acres of the Great Basin in the relatively recent past.These discussions culminate with the impressive history of the prehistoric people of the Great Basin, a history that shows how human societies dealt with nearly 13,000 years of climate change on this often-challenging landscape"--Provided by publisher.
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The Pigeonpea Genome

Author: Rajeev K. Varshney,Rachit K. Saxena,Scott A. Jackson

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319637975

Category: Science

Page: 104

View: 2572

Pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan) is a crop of small land holding farmers in arid and semi-arid regions of the world. It has a number of usages starting from protein rich food to vegetarian families; fuel wood; nitrogen supplier to soil; recycling minerals in soil to animal feed etc. Pigeonpea has been considered to be originated and domesticated in central India from where it travelled to different parts of the world such as Africa and Latin America. In ongoing scenario of climate change, biotic and especially abiotic stresses will make the conditions more challenging for entire agriculture. This volume focusing on the pigeonpea genome will collate the information on the genome sequencing and its utilization in genomics activities, with a focus on the current findings, advanced tools and strategies deployed in pigeonpea genome sequencing and analysis, and how this information is leading to direct outcomes for plant breeders and subsequently to farmers.
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Archaic State Interaction

The Eastern Mediterranean in the Bronze Age

Author: William A. Parkinson,Michael L. Galaty

Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the

ISBN: 9781934691205

Category: History

Page: 318

View: 8500

In current archaeological research the failure to find common ground between world-systems theory believers and their counterParts has resulted in a stagnation of theoretical development in regards to modeling how early state societies ititeracted with their neighbors. This book is an attempt to redress these issues. By shifting the theoretical focus away from questions of state evolution to state interaction, the authors develop anthropological models for understanding how ancient states interacted with one another and with societies of scales of economic and political organization. One of their goals has been to identify a theoretical middle ground that is neither dogmatic nor dismissive. The result is innovative approach to modeling-social interaction that will he helpful in exploring the relationship between Social processes that occur at different geographic scales and over different temporal durations. The scholars who participated in the SAR advanced seminar that resulted in this hook used a Particular geographic and temporal context as a case study for developing anthropological models of interaction that are cross-cultural in scope but still deal well with the idiosyncrasies of specific culture histories. Advance praise for Archaic State Interaction "An excellent example of a meeting of the minds to hammer at an interesting and current set of problems affecting archaeologists around the world...It is not necessary for the reader to be a 'believer' in world-systems theory to benefit from these essays."-Thomas F. Tartaron, University of Pennsylvania
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Ancient Peoples of the Great Basin and Colorado Plateau

Author: Steven R Simms

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1315434954

Category: Social Science

Page: 383

View: 1037

Written to appeal to professional archaeologists, students, and the interested public alike, this book is a long overdue introduction to the ancient peoples of the Great Basin and northern Colorado Plateau. Through detailed syntheses, the reader is drawn into the story of the habitation of the Great Basin from the entry of the first Native Americans through the arrival of Europeans. Ancient Peoples is a major contribution to Great Basin archaeology and anthropology, as well as the general study of foraging societies.
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Moon Colorado Camping

The Complete Guide to Tent and RV Camping

Author: Joshua Berman

Publisher: Avalon Travel

ISBN: 1631213563

Category: Travel

Page: 350

View: 2250

Join local expert and camping aficionado Joshua Berman for an unforgettable experience. With his unique perspective and advice you can trust, Moon Colorado Camping has everything you need to know to have a more personal and memorable experience. Moon Colorado Camping tells you what you need to know to plan the perfect trip for you. Whether you’re RV camping, hiking into the backcountry, or just looking for a quick getaway, you’ll find the perfect campsite. Along with lists of best campgrounds for Weddings, Stunning Views, Climbing Fourteeners (as Colorado has the most mountains over 14,000 feet in the US), and Hot Springs, Berman includes tips on camping equipment, food, and gear, as well as advice on convenient roadside stopovers and nearby recreation. With expertly crafted maps with easy-to-follow driving instructions and gorgeous photos, this guidebook gives you the tools you need to have an immersive and unique experience. Moon Colorado Camping includes areas such as: Western Slope Central Mountains The Front Range Four Corners and the San Juan Mountains San Luis Valley and the Sangre de Christos Find the Moon guide that best suits your trip! Exploring the area? Try Moon Denver, Boulder, and Colorado Springs and Moon Colorado. Exploring by car? Check out Moon Southwest Road Trip!
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The Catholic encyclopedia;

an international work of reference on the constitution, doctrine, discipline, and history of the Catholic church;

Author: Charles George Herbermann

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Encyclopedias and dictionaries

Page: N.A

View: 4623

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Traces of Fremont

Society and Rock Art in Ancient Utah

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Art

Page: 132

View: 7715

Fremont is a culture (ca. 300-1300 A.D.) first defined by archaeologist Noel Morss in 1928 based on characteristics unique to the area. Intially thought to be a simple socio-political system, recent reassessments of the Fremont assume a more complex society. This volume places Fremont rock art studies in this contemporary context. Author Steven Simms offers an innovative model of Fremont society, politics, and world-view using the principles of analogy and current archaeological evidence. Simms takes readers on a trip back in time by describing what a typical Fremont "hamlet" or residential area might have looked like a thousand years ago, including the inhabitants' daily activities. Francois Gohier's captivating photographs of Fremont art and artifacts offer an engaging complement to Simms's text, aiding us in our understanding of the lives of these ancient people. Simms's book is excellent! I really like his take on Fremont, I like the narrative descriptions of various Fremont settlements, and I like his treatment of rock art--balanced and scholarly without losing the interest and excitement of that astonishing Fremont medium. --Stephen H. Lekson, professor of anthropology and curator, University of Colorado Museum of Natural History
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