Hair Story

Untangling the Roots of Black Hair in America

Author: Ayana D. Byrd,Lori L. Tharps

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780756769826

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 198

View: 2634

This book, written for all races, is a historical exploration of Black Americans' tangled hair roots. A chronological look at the culture & politics behind the ever-changing state of Black hair from 15th-century Africa to the present-day U.S., the book ties the personal to the political & the popular. It covers the different chemical & natural treatments to straighten hair; how the Afro evolved from militant style to mainstream fashion trend; & what prompted the creation of the Jheri curl & its fall from grace. Major figures in the history of Black hair are presented, from early entrepreneurs Annie Turnbo Malone & Madam C.J. Walker to unintended hair heroes like Angela Davis & Bob Marley. Stylists, celebrities & critics weigh in on the issues of Black hair.
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Hair Story

Untangling the Roots of Black Hair in America

Author: Ayana Byrd,Lori Tharps

Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin

ISBN: 1466872101

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 5870

Two world wars, the Civil Rights movement, and a Jheri curl later, Blacks in America continue to have a complex and convoluted relationship with their hair. From the antebellum practice of shaving the head in an attempt to pass as a "free" person to the 1998 uproar over a White third-grade teacher's reading of the book Nappy Hair, the issues surrounding African American hair continue to linger as we enter the twenty-first century. Hair Story is a historical and anecdotal exploration of Black Americans' tangled hair roots. A chronological look at the culture and politics behind the ever-changing state of Black hair from fifteenth-century Africa to the present-day United States, it ties the personal to the political and the popular. Read about: * Why Black American slaves used items like axle grease and eel skin to straighten their hair. * How a Mexican chemist straightened Black hair using his formula for turning sheep's wool into a minklike fur. * How the Afro evolved from militant style to mainstream fashion trend. * What prompted the creation of the Jheri curl and the popular style's fall from grace. * The story behind Bo Derek's controversial cornrows and the range of reactions they garnered. Major figures in the history of Black hair are presented, from early hair-care entrepreneurs Annie Turnbo Malone and Madam C. J. Walker to unintended hair heroes like Angela Davis and Bob Marley. Celebrities, stylists, and cultural critics weigh in on the burgeoning sociopolitical issues surrounding Black hair, from the historically loaded terms "good" and "bad" hair, to Black hair in the workplace, to mainstream society's misrepresentation and misunderstanding of kinky locks. Hair Story is the book that Black Americans can use as a benchmark for tracing a unique aspect of their history, and it's a book that people of all races will celebrate as the reference guide for understanding Black hair.
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Das Leben kommt immer dazwischen

Stationen einer Reise

Author: Auma Obama

Publisher: BASTEI LÜBBE

ISBN: 3838701402

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 300

View: 2089

Auma Obama wächst in Kenia auf, studiert in Heidelberg und Bayreuth, lebt 16 Jahre in Deutschland, später in England. Der Aufstieg ihres Bruders Barack führt sie mehrfach in die USA und zu gemeinsamen Reisen durch Kenia. Das Leben in gegensätzlichen Kulturen löst Gefühle der Entfremdung und Einsamkeit in ihr aus und lässt ein Bewusstsein für afrikanische Identität erwachen. Bald steht für sie fest: Die Arbeit mit Kindern und Jugendlichen in ihrer Heimat ist der Schlüssel für eine bessere Zukunft.
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Hair Story, see ISBN 978-1-4668-7210-3

Untangling the Roots of Black Hair in America

Author: Ayana Byrd,Lori Tharps

Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin

ISBN: 1466846828

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 5936

Two world wars, the Civil Rights movement, and a Jheri curl later, Blacks in America continue to have a complex and convoluted relationship with their hair. From the antebellum practice of shaving the head in an attempt to pass as a "free" person to the 1998 uproar over a White third-grade teacher's reading of the book Nappy Hair, the issues surrounding Black hair continue to linger as we enter the twenty-first century. Hair Story is a historical and anecdotal exploration of Black Americans' tangled hair roots. A chronological look at the culture and politics behind the ever-changing state of Black hair from fifteenth-century Africa to the present-day United States, it ties the personal to the political and the popular. Read about: * Why Black American slaves used items like axle grease and eel skin to straighten their hair. * How a Mexican chemist straightened Black hair using his formula for turning sheep's wool into a minklike fur. * How the Afro evolved from militant style to mainstream fashion trend. * What prompted the creation of the Jheri curl and the popular style's fall from grace. * The story behind Bo Derek's controversial cornrows and the range of reactions they garnered. Major figures in the history of Black hair are presented, from early hair-care entrepreneurs Annie Turnbo Malone and Madam C. J. Walker to unintended hair heroes like Angela Davis and Bob Marley. Celebrities, stylists, and cultural critics weigh in on the burgeoning sociopolitical issues surrounding Black hair, from the historically loaded terms "good" and "bad" hair, to Black hair in the workplace, to mainstream society's misrepresentation and misunderstanding of kinky locks. Hair Story is the book that Black Americans can use as a benchmark for tracing a unique aspect of their history, and it's a book that people of all races will celebrate as the reference guide for understanding Black hair.
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Color Matters

Skin Tone Bias and the Myth of a Postracial America

Author: Kimberly Jade Norwood

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 131781956X

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 6415

In the United States, as in many parts of the world, people are discriminated against based on the color of their skin. This type of skin tone bias, or colorism, is both related to and distinct from discrimination on the basis of race, with which it is often conflated. Preferential treatment of lighter skin tones over darker occurs within racial and ethnic groups as well as between them. While America has made progress in issues of race over the past decades, discrimination on the basis of color continues to be a constant and often unremarked part of life. In Color Matters, Kimberly Jade Norwood has collected the most up-to-date research on this insidious form of discrimination, including perspectives from the disciplines of history, law, sociology, and psychology. Anchored with historical chapters that show how the influence and legacy of slavery have shaped the treatment of skin color in American society, the contributors to this volume bring to light the ways in which colorism affects us all--influencing what we wear, who we see on television, and even which child we might pick to adopt. Sure to be an eye-opening collection for anyone curious about how race and color continue to affect society, Color Matters provides students of race in America with wide-ranging overview of a crucial topic.
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African American Mystery Writers

A Historical and Thematic Study

Author: Frankie Y. Bailey

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786452331

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 277

View: 7939

The book describes the movement by African American authors from slave narratives and antebellum newspapers into fiction writing, and the subsequent developments of black genre fiction through the present. It analyzes works by modern African American mystery writers, focusing on sleuths, the social locations of crime, victims and offenders, the notion of “doing justice,” and the role of African American cultural vernacular in mystery fiction. A final section focuses on readers and reading, examining African American mystery writers’ access to the marketplace and the issue of the “double audience” raised by earlier writers. Instructors considering this book for use in a course may request an examination copy here.
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Beauty Shop Politics

African American Women's Activism in the Beauty Industry

Author: Tiffany M. Gill

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252076966

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 192

View: 9324

Looking through the lens of black business history, Beauty Shop Politics shows how black beauticians in the Jim Crow era parlayed their economic independence and access to a public community space into platforms for activism. Tiffany M. Gill argues that the beauty industry played a crucial role in the creation of the modern black female identity and that the seemingly frivolous space of a beauty salon actually has stimulated social, political, and economic change. From the founding of the National Negro Business League in 1900 and onward, African Americans have embraced the entrepreneurial spirit by starting their own businesses, but black women's forays into the business world were overshadowed by those of black men. With a broad scope that encompasses the role of gossip in salons, ethnic beauty products, and the social meanings of African American hair textures, Gill shows how African American beauty entrepreneurs built and sustained a vibrant culture of activism in beauty salons and schools. Enhanced by lucid portrayals of black beauticians and drawing on archival research and oral histories, Beauty Shop Politics conveys the everyday operations and rich culture of black beauty salons as well as their role in building community.
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Race and Racism in the United States: An Encyclopedia of the American Mosaic [4 volumes]

An Encyclopedia of the American Mosaic

Author: Charles A. Gallagher,Cameron D. Lippard

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1440803463

Category: Social Science

Page: 1771

View: 668

How is race defined and perceived in America today, and how do these definitions and perceptions compare to attitudes 100 years ago... or 200 years ago? This four-volume set is the definitive source for every topic related to race in the United States.
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Kinky Gazpacho

Life, Love & Spain

Author: Lori L. Tharps

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1416565744

Category: Travel

Page: 224

View: 1272

Magazine writer and editor Lori Tharps was born and raised in the comfortable but mostly White suburbs of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where she was often the only person of color in her school and neighborhood. At an early age, Lori decided that her destiny would be discovered in Spain. She didn't know anyone from Spain, had never visited the country, and hardly spoke the language. Still, she never faltered in her plans to escape to the Iberian Peninsula. Arriving in the country as an optimistic college student, however, Lori soon discovers Spain's particular attitude toward Blackness. She is chased down the street by the local schoolchildren and pointed at incessantly in public, and her innocent dreams of a place where race doesn't matter are shattered. The story would end there, except Lori meets and marries a Spaniard, and that's when her true Spanish adventure really begins. Against the ancient backdrops of Cádiz and Andalucía, Lori starts the intricate yet amusing journey of rekindling her love affair with Spain and becoming a part of her new Spanish family. From a grandmother who spies on her to a grandfather who warmly welcomes her to town with a slew of racist jokes, the close-knit clan isn't exactly waiting with open arms. Kinky Gazpacho tells the story of the redeeming power of love and finding self in the most unexpected places. At its heart, this is a love story. It is a memoir, a travel essay, and a glimpse into the past and present of Spain. As humorous and entertaining as such favorite travel stories as Under the Tuscan Sun, this book also unveils a unique and untold history of Spain's enduring connection to West Africa. Kinky Gazpacho celebrates the mysticism of travel and the joys of watching two distinct cultures connect and come together.
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Hair, Headwear, and Orthodox Jewish Women

Kallah's Choice

Author: Amy K. Milligan

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 0739183664

Category: Religion

Page: 166

View: 5943

In this study, Milligan uses an interdisciplinary ethnographic approach to consider the lived religious cultural experiences of Orthodox Jewish women living in a small community. Through an investigation of hair and head covering, Milligan explores the meaning of tradition in a contemporary context.
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Plucked

A History of Hair Removal

Author: Rebecca M. Herzig

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479840254

Category: Social Science

Page: 280

View: 4639

From the clamshell razors and homemade lye depilatories used in colonial America to the diode lasers and prescription pharmaceuticals available today, Americans have used a staggering array of tools to remove hair deemed unsightly, unnatural, or excessive. This is true especially for women and girls; conservative estimates indicate that 99% of American women have tried hair removal, and at least 85% regularly remove hair from their faces, armpits, legs, and bikini lines. How and when does hair become a problem—what makes some growth “excessive”? Who or what separates the necessary from the superfluous? In Plucked, historian Rebecca Herzig addresses these questions about hair removal. She shows how, over time, dominant American beliefs about visible hair changed: where once elective hair removal was considered a “mutilation” practiced primarily by “savage” men, by the turn of the twentieth century, hair-free faces and limbs were expected for women. Visible hair growth—particularly on young, white women—came to be perceived as a sign of political extremism, sexual deviance, or mental illness. By the turn of the twenty-first century, more and more Americans were waxing, threading, shaving, or lasering themselves smooth. Herzig’s extraordinary account also reveals some of the collateral damages of the intensifying pursuit of hair-free skin. Moving beyond the experiences of particular patients or clients, Herzig describes the surprising histories of race, science, industry, and medicine behind today's hair-removing tools. Plucked is an unsettling, gripping, and original tale of the lengths to which Americans will go to remove hair.
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Enslaved Women in America: An Encyclopedia

An Encyclopedia

Author: Daina Ramey Berry Ph.D.,Deleso A. Alford

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 0313349096

Category: Social Science

Page: 381

View: 2963

This singular reference provides an authoritative account of the daily lives of enslaved women in the United States, from colonial times to emancipation following the Civil War. Through essays, photos, and primary source documents, the female experience is explored, and women are depicted as central, rather than marginal, figures in history. • Dozens of photos of former enslaved women • Detailed historical timeline • Numerous rare primary documents, including runaway slave advertisements and even a plantation recipe for turtle soup • Profiles of noted female slaves and their works
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Madame Walker Theatre Center

An Indianapolis Treasure

Author: A'Lelia Bundles

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 1439644136

Category: Photography

Page: 128

View: 861

As they watched construction of the block-long flatiron building brick by brick throughout 1927, African American residents of Indianapolis could scarcely contain their pride. This new headquarters of the Madam C.J. Walker Manufacturing Company, with its terra-cotta trimmed facade, was to be more than corporate offices and a factory for what then was one of America’s most successful black businesses. In fact, it was designed as “a city within a city,” with an African Art Deco theater, ballroom, restaurant, drugstore, beauty salon, beauty school, and medical offices. Generations of African American families met for Sunday dinner at the Coffee Pot, enjoyed first-run movies and live performances in the Walker Theatre, and hosted dances in the Casino. Today, this National Historic Landmark is an arts center anchoring the Indiana Avenue Cultural District.
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The Urban Ethnography Reader

Author: Mitchell Duneier,Philip Kasinitz,Alexandra Murphy

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019932591X

Category: Social Science

Page: 520

View: 6916

Urban ethnography is the firsthand study of city life by investigators who immerse themselves in the worlds of the people about whom they write. Since its inception in the early twentieth century, this great tradition has helped define how we think about cities and city dwellers. The past few decades have seen an extraordinary revival in the field, as scholars and the public at large grapple with the increasingly complex and pressing issues that affect the ever-changing American city-from poverty to the immigrant experience, the changing nature of social bonds to mass incarceration, hyper-segregation to gentrification. As both a method of research and a form of literature, urban ethnography has seen a notable and important resurgence. This renewed interest demands a clear and comprehensive understanding of the history and development of the field to which this volume contributes by presenting a selection of past and present contributions to American urban ethnographic writing. Beginning with an original introduction highlighting the origins, practices, and significance of the field, editors Mitchell Duneier, Philip Kasinitz, and Alexandra Murphy guide the reader through the major and fascinating topics on which it has focused -- from the community, public spaces, family, education, work, and recreation, to social policy, and the relationship between ethnographers and their subjects. An indispensable guide, The Urban Ethnography Reader provides an overview of how the discipline has grown and developed while offering students and scholars a selection of some of the finest social scientific writing on the life of the modern city.
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Becoming Women

The Embodied Self in Image Culture

Author: Carla Rice

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442668261

Category: Social Science

Page: 408

View: 7646

In a culture where beauty is currency, women’s bodies are often perceived as measures of value and worth. The search for visibility and self-acceptance can be daunting, especially for those on the cultural margins of “beauty.” Becoming Women offers a thoughtful examination of the search for identity in an image-oriented world. That search is told through the experiences of a group of women who came of age in the wake of second and third wave feminism, featuring voices from marginalized and misrepresented groups. Carla Rice pairs popular imagery with personal narratives to expose the “culture of contradiction” where increases in individual body acceptance have been matched by even more restrictive feminine image ideals and norms. With insider insights from the Dove Campaign for Real Beauty, Rice exposes the beauty industry’s colonization of women’s bodies, and examines why “the beauty myth” has yet to be resolved.
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Same Family, Different Colors

Confronting Colorism in America's Diverse Families

Author: Lori L. Tharps

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807071080

Category: FAMILY & RELATIONSHIPS

Page: 216

View: 5802

Explores the issue of colorism and color bias in African American, Latino, Asian American, and mixed-race families and communities by weaving together personal stories, history, and analysis. The result is a portrait of the myriad ways skin-color politics affect family dynamics in the United States. --From publisher description.
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Substitute Me

Author: Lori L. Tharps

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781439171110

Category: Fiction

Page: 368

View: 517

Zora Anderson is a 30-year-old African American middle class, college educated woman, trained as a chef, looking for a job. As fate would have it, Kate and Craig, a married couple, aspiring professionals with a young child are looking for a nanny. Zora seems perfect. She’s an enthusiastic caretaker, a competent house keeper, a great cook. And she wants the job, despite the fact that she won’t let her African American parents and brother know anything about this new career move. They expect much more from her than to use all that good education to do what so many Blacks have dreamed of not doing: working for White folks. Working as an au pair in Paris, France no less, was one thing, they could accept that. Being a servant to a couple not much older nor more educated, is yet another. Every adult character involved in this tangled web is hiding something: the husband is hiding his desire to turn a passion for comic books into a business from his wife, the wife is hiding her professional ambitions from her husband, the nanny is hiding her job from her family and maybe her motivations for staying on her job from herself. Memorable characters, real-life tensions and concerns and the charming—in a hip kind of way—modern-day Park Slope, Fort Greene, Brooklyn setting make for an un-put-down-able read.
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