Forced Migration and Global Politics

Author: Alexander Betts

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781444315875

Category: Political Science

Page: 224

View: 6421

Using real-world examples and in-depth case studies, Forced Migration and Global Politics systematically applies International Relations theory to explore the international politics of forced migration. Provides an accessible and thought-provoking introduction to the main debates and concepts in international relations and examines their relevance for understanding forced migration Utilizes a wide-range of real-world examples and in-depth case studies, including the harmonization of EU asylum and immigration policy and the securitization of asylum since 9/11 Explores the relevance of cutting-edge debates in international relations to forced migration
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Forced Migration and Global Politics

Author: Alexander Betts

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN: 9781405180320

Category: Political Science

Page: 224

View: 357

Using real-world examples and in-depth case studies, Forced Migration and Global Politics systematically applies International Relations theory to explore the international politics of forced migration. Provides an accessible and thought-provoking introduction to the main debates and concepts in international relations and examines their relevance for understanding forced migration Utilizes a wide-range of real-world examples and in-depth case studies, including the harmonization of EU asylum and immigration policy and the securitization of asylum since 9/11 Explores the relevance of cutting-edge debates in international relations to forced migration
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Forced Migration and Global Politics

Author: Alexander Betts

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN: 9781405180313

Category: Political Science

Page: 224

View: 9325

Using real-world examples and in-depth case studies, Forced Migration and Global Politics systematically applies International Relations theory to explore the international politics of forced migration. Provides an accessible and thought-provoking introduction to the main debates and concepts in international relations and examines their relevance for understanding forced migration Utilizes a wide-range of real-world examples and in-depth case studies, including the harmonization of EU asylum and immigration policy and the securitization of asylum since 9/11 Explores the relevance of cutting-edge debates in international relations to forced migration
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Refugees in International Relations

Author: Alexander Betts,Gil Loescher

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019958074X

Category: Political Science

Page: 337

View: 2001

Refugees lie at the heart of world politics. The causes and consequences of, and responses to, human displacement are intertwined with many of the core concerns of International Relations. Yet, scholars of International Relations have generally bypassed the study of refugees, and Forced Migration Studies has generally bypassed insights from International Relations. Refugees in International Relations therefore represents an attempt to bridge the divide between these disciplines, and to place refugees within the mainstream of International Relations. Drawing together the work and ideas of a combination of the world's leading and emerging International Relations scholars, Refugees in International Relations considers what ideas from International Relations can offer our understanding of the international politics of forced migration. The insights draw from across the theoretical spectrum of International Relations from realism to critical theory to feminism, covering issues including international cooperation, security, and the international political economy. They engage with some of the most challenging political and practical questions in contemporary forced migration, including peacebuilding, post-conflict reconstruction, and statebuilding. The result is a set of highly original chapters, yielding not only new concepts of wider relevance to International Relations but also insights for academics, policy-makers, and practitioners working on forced migration in particular and humanitarianism in general.
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Forced Migration and Global Processes

A View from Forced Migration Studies

Author: Francois Crepeau,Delphine Nakache,Michael Collyer,Nathaniel H. Goetz,Art Hansen

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 0739155059

Category: Social Science

Page: 424

View: 8049

Forced Migration and Global Processes considers the crossroads of forced migration with three global trends: development, human rights, and security. This expert collection studies these complex interactions and aims to help determine what solutions may alleviate most of the human suffering involved in forced migrations.
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The Oxford Handbook of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies

Author: Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh,Gil Loescher,Katy Long,Nando Sigona

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191645877

Category: Political Science

Page: 800

View: 6175

Refugee and Forced Migration Studies has grown from being a concern of a relatively small number of scholars and policy researchers in the 1980s to a global field of interest with thousands of students worldwide studying displacement either from traditional disciplinary perspectives or as a core component of newer programmes across the Humanities and Social and Political Sciences. Today the field encompasses both rigorous academic research which may or may not ultimately inform policy and practice, as well as action-research focused on advocating in favour of refugees' needs and rights. This authoritative Handbook critically evaluates the birth and development of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies, and analyses the key contemporary and future challenges faced by academics and practitioners working with and for forcibly displaced populations around the world. The 52 state-of-the-art chapters, written by leading academics, practitioners, and policymakers working in universities, research centres, think tanks, NGOs and international organizations, provide a comprehensive and cutting-edge overview of the key intellectual, political, social and institutional challenges arising from mass displacement in the world today. The chapters vividly illustrate the vibrant and engaging debates that characterise this rapidly expanding field of research and practice.
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Global Migration Governance

Author: Alexander Betts

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199600457

Category: Law

Page: 343

View: 2886

In the context of the growing politicization of migration a debate has emerged in policy and academia on the need to develop global governance on migration to facilitate better inter-state cooperation. This book provides an introduction to the institutions, politics, and normative dimensions of different aspects of international migration
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Survival Migration

Failed Governance and the Crisis of Displacement

Author: Alexander Betts

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801468957

Category: Political Science

Page: 240

View: 4339

International treaties, conventions, and organizations to protect refugees were established in the aftermath of World War II to protect people escaping targeted persecution by their own governments. However, the nature of cross-border displacement has transformed dramatically since then. Such threats as environmental change, food insecurity, and generalized violence force massive numbers of people to flee states that are unable or unwilling to ensure their basic rights, as do conditions in failed and fragile states that make possible human rights deprivations. Because these reasons do not meet the legal understanding of persecution, the victims of these circumstances are not usually recognized as “refugees,” preventing current institutions from ensuring their protection. In this book, Alexander Betts develops the concept of “survival migration” to highlight the crisis in which these people find themselves. Examining flight from three of the most fragile states in Africa—Zimbabwe, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Somalia—Betts explains variation in institutional responses across the neighboring host states. There is massive inconsistency. Some survival migrants are offered asylum as refugees; others are rounded up, detained, and deported, often in brutal conditions. The inadequacies of the current refugee regime are a disaster for human rights and gravely threaten international security. In Survival Migration, Betts outlines these failings, illustrates the enormous human suffering that results, and argues strongly for an expansion of protected categories.
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Forced Migration

Current Issues and Debates

Author: Alice Bloch,Giorgia Dona

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 131722695X

Category: Social Science

Page: 178

View: 4060

Forced Migration: Current Issues and Debates provides a critical engagement with and analysis of contemporary issues in the field using inter-disciplinary perspectives, through different geographical case studies and by employing varying methodologies. The combination of authors reviewing both the key research and scholarship and offering insights from their own research ensures a comprehensive and up-to-date analysis of the current issues in forced migration. The book is structured around three main current themes: the reconfiguration of borders including virtual borders, the expansion of prolonged exile, and changes in protection and access to rights. The first chapters in the collection provide both context and a theoretical overview by situating current debates and issues in their historical context including the evolution of field and the impact of the colonial and post-colonial world order on forced migration and forced displacement. These are followed by chapters framed around substantive issues including deportation and forced return; protracted displacements; securitising the Mediterranean and cross-border migration practices; refugees in global cities; forced migrants in the digital age; and second-generation identity and transnational practices. Forced Migration offers an original contribution to a growing field of study, connecting theoretical ideas and empirical research with policy, practice and the lived experiences of forced migrants. The volume provides a solid foundation, for students, academics and policy makers, of the main questions being asked in contemporary debates in forced migration.
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Engendering Forced Migration

Theory and Practice

Author: Doreen Marie Indra

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9781571811356

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 390

View: 7677

At the turn of the new millenium, war, political oppression, desperate poverty, environmental degradation and disasters, and economic underdevelopment are sharply increasing the ranks of the world's twenty million forced migrants. In this volume, eighteen scholars provide a wide-ranging, interdisciplinary look beyond the statistics at the experiences of the women, men, girls, and boys who comprise this global flow, and at the highly gendered forces that frame and affect them. In theorizing gender and forced migration, these authors present a set of descriptively rich, gendered case studies drawn from around the world on topics ranging from international human rights, to the culture of aid, to the complex ways in which women and men envision displacement and resettlement.
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Children and Forced Migration

Durable Solutions During Transient Years

Author: Marisa O. Ensor,Elżbieta M. Goździak

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319406914

Category: Social Science

Page: 371

View: 3227

This book responds to the reality that children and youth constitute a disproportionately large percentage of displaced populations worldwide. It demonstrates how their hopes and aspirations reflect the transient nature of their age group, and often differ from those of their elders. It also examines how they face additional difficulties due to the inconsistent definition and uneven implementation of the traditional ‘durable solutions’ to forced migration implemented by national governments and international assistance agencies. The authors use empirical research findings and robust policy analyses of cases of child displacement across the globe to make their central argument: that the particular challenges and opportunities that displaced children and youth face must be investigated and factored into relevant policy and practice, promoting more sustainable and durable solutions in the process. This interdisciplinary edited collection will appeal to students and scholars of forced migration studies, development, conflict and peace-building and youth studies, along with policy-makers, children's rights organizations and NGOs.
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Transnational Ruptures

Gender and Forced Migration

Author: Catherine Nolin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351877879

Category: Social Science

Page: 266

View: 7558

A key development in international migration in recent years has been the increasing feminization of migrant populations. Research attention now focuses not only on the growing number of women on the move but also on their changing gender roles as more female migrants participate as principal wage earners and heads of household rather than as 'dependants'. The tensions between population displacement within and beyond Guatemala and the multiple local, regional and national realities encountered and reconfigured by these refugee and migrants allow a fascinating window onto the connections and ruptures experienced in a 'global/local world'. Transnational Ruptures holds great interest and value for a wide readership, from scholars who are interested in transnational and refugee studies and international migration, to upper level university students in disciplines such as human geography, anthropology, sociology, Latin American Studies, gender studies, political science and international studies.
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Governing the World?

Cases in Global Governance

Author: Sophie Harman,David Williams

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135049637

Category: Political Science

Page: 242

View: 8385

‘Global governance’ has become a key concept in the contemporary study of international politics, yet what the term means and how it works remains in question. Governing the World: Cases in Global Governance takes an alternative approach to understanding the concept by exploring how global governance works in practice through a set of case studies on both classical issues of international relations such as security, labour and trade, and more contemporary concerns such as the environment, international development, and governing the internet. The book explores the processes, practice and politics of global governance by taking a broad look at issues of human rights governance and focusing on detailed aspects of a topic such as torture and rendition to help explain how governance does, or does not, work to students and researchers of international politics alike. Bringing together a diverse and international group of scholars, each chapter responds to a set of questions as to what is being governed, how and who by and offers issue-specific case studies and recommended reading to develop a full understanding of the issue explored and what it means for global governance.
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Climate Change, Forced Migration, and International Law

Author: Jane McAdam

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199587087

Category: Law

Page: 319

View: 2420

This is a key study into whether 'climate change refugees' are protected by international law. It examines the reasons why people do or do not move; how far climate change is a trigger for movement; and whether traditional international responses, such as creating new treaties and new institutions, are appropriate solutions in this context.
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Weapons of Mass Migration

Forced Displacement, Coercion, and Foreign Policy

Author: Kelly M. Greenhill

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801457424

Category: Political Science

Page: 360

View: 1953

At first glance, the U.S. decision to escalate the war in Vietnam in the mid-1960s, China's position on North Korea's nuclear program in the late 1990s and early 2000s, and the EU resolution to lift what remained of the arms embargo against Libya in the mid-2000s would appear to share little in common. Yet each of these seemingly unconnected and far-reaching foreign policy decisions resulted at least in part from the exercise of a unique kind of coercion, one predicated on the intentional creation, manipulation, and exploitation of real or threatened mass population movements. In Weapons of Mass Migration, Kelly M. Greenhill offers the first systematic examination of this widely deployed but largely unrecognized instrument of state influence. She shows both how often this unorthodox brand of coercion has been attempted (more than fifty times in the last half century) and how successful it has been (well over half the time). She also tackles the questions of who employs this policy tool, to what ends, and how and why it ever works. Coercers aim to affect target states' behavior by exploiting the existence of competing political interests and groups, Greenhill argues, and by manipulating the costs or risks imposed on target state populations. This "coercion by punishment" strategy can be effected in two ways: the first relies on straightforward threats to overwhelm a target's capacity to accommodate a refugee or migrant influx; the second, on a kind of norms-enhanced political blackmail that exploits the existence of legal and normative commitments to those fleeing violence, persecution, or privation. The theory is further illustrated and tested in a variety of case studies from Europe, East Asia, and North America. To help potential targets better respond to-and protect themselves against-this kind of unconventional predation, Weapons of Mass Migration also offers practicable policy recommendations for scholars, government officials, and anyone concerned about the true victims of this kind of coercion-the displaced themselves.
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Catching Fire

Containing Forced Migration in a Volatile World

Author: Nicholas Van Hear,Chris McDowell

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 9780739112441

Category: Political Science

Page: 261

View: 7903

Catching Fire provides for the first time an in-depth analysis of political and humanitarian catastrophes in which forced migration characterizes the complexity of both the emergency and the response. The book examines forced migration both within borders and beyond borders, giving attention to the complex combination of circumstances in which refugees often find themselves and the impact of relief programs.
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Driven from Home

Protecting the Rights of Forced Migrants

Author: David Hollenbach, SJ

Publisher: Georgetown University Press

ISBN: 1589016793

Category: Political Science

Page: 296

View: 7748

Throughout human history people have been driven from their homes by wars, unjust treatment, earthquakes, and hurricanes. The reality of forced migration is not new, nor is awareness of the suffering of the displaced a recent discovery. The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees estimates that at the end of 2007 there were 67 million persons in the world who had been forcibly displaced from their homes—including more than 16 million people who had to flee across an international border for fear of being persecuted due to race, religion, nationality, social group, or political opinion. Driven from Home advances the discussion on how best to protect and assist the growing number of persons who have been forced from their homes and proposes a human rights framework to guide political and policy responses to forced migration. This thought-provoking volume brings together contributors from several disciplines, including international affairs, law, ethics, economics, and theology, to advocate for better responses to protect the global community’s most vulnerable citizens.
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The Migration-Displacement Nexus

Patterns, Processes, and Policies

Author: Khalid Koser,Susan Martin

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 0857451928

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 7256

The "migration-displacement nexus" is a new concept intended to capture the complex and dynamic interactions between voluntary and forced migration, both internally and internationally. Besides elaborating a new concept, this volume has three main purposes: the first is to focus empirical attention on previously understudied topics, such as internal trafficking and the displacement of foreign nationals, using case studies including Afghanistan and Iraq; the second is to highlight new challenges, including urban displacement and the effects of climate change; and the third is to explore gaps in current policy responses and elaborate alternatives for the future.
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Rethinking Security in the Age of Migration

Trust and Emancipation in Europe

Author: Ali Bilgic

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136765352

Category: Political Science

Page: 224

View: 5400

Migration and especially irregular migration are politically sensitive and highly debated issues in the developed world, particularly in Europe. This book analyses irregular protection-seeking migration in Europe, with close attention to sub-Saharan migration into the EU, from the perspective of emancipatory security theory. Some individuals leave their countries because political, social, and economic structures largely fail to provide protection. This book examines how communities respond to migrants who seek protection and security, where migration is perceived as a source of insecurity by many in that community. The central aim of this critical analysis is to explore ideas and practices which can contribute to replacing the political structures of insecurity with emancipatory structures, where individuals (both irregular migrants and members of the receiving communities) enjoy security together, not opposed to each other. Drawing on the security dilemma, critical approaches to security, forced migration and trust, the book demonstrates how common life between two groups of individuals can be politically constructed, in tandem with limitations, risks, and possible handicaps of initiating such a construction in world politics. Rethinking Security in the Age of Migration will be of interest to students and scholars of migration studies, security studies, international relations, European politics and sociology.
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The Uprooted

Improving Humanitarian Responses to Forced Migration

Author: Susan F. Martin

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 9780739110836

Category: Political Science

Page: 294

View: 2906

The Uprooted is the first volume to methodically examine the progress and persistent shortcomings of the current humanitarian regime. The authors, all experts in the field of forced migration, describe the organizational, political, and conceptual shortcomings that are creating the gaps and inefficiencies of international and national agencies to reach entire categories of forced migrants. They make policy-based recommendations to improve international, regional, national, and local responses in areas including organization, security, funding, and durability of response.
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