Engendering Forced Migration

Theory and Practice

Author: Doreen Marie Indra

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9781571811356

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 390

View: 4371

At the turn of the new millenium, war, political oppression, desperate poverty, environmental degradation and disasters, and economic underdevelopment are sharply increasing the ranks of the world's twenty million forced migrants. In this volume, eighteen scholars provide a wide-ranging, interdisciplinary look beyond the statistics at the experiences of the women, men, girls, and boys who comprise this global flow, and at the highly gendered forces that frame and affect them. In theorizing gender and forced migration, these authors present a set of descriptively rich, gendered case studies drawn from around the world on topics ranging from international human rights, to the culture of aid, to the complex ways in which women and men envision displacement and resettlement.
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Engendering Forced Migration

Theory and Practice

Author: Doreen Indra

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 1782381597

Category: Social Science

Page: 424

View: 7325

At the turn of the new millenium, war, political oppression, desperate poverty, environmental degradation and disasters, and economic underdevelopment are sharply increasing the ranks of the world's twenty million forced migrants. In this volume, eighteen scholars provide a wide-ranging, interdisciplinary look beyond the statistics at the experiences of the women, men, girls, and boys who comprise this global flow, and at the highly gendered forces that frame and affect them. In theorizing gender and forced migration, these authors present a set of descriptively rich, gendered case studies drawn from around the world on topics ranging from international human rights, to the culture of aid, to the complex ways in which women and men envision displacement and resettlement.
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Engendering Forced Migration

Theory and Practice

Author: Doreen Marie Indra

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN: 9781571811349

Category: Social Science

Page: 390

View: 7598

At the turn of the new millenium, war, political oppression, desperate poverty, environmental degradation and disasters, and economic underdevelopment are sharply increasing the ranks of the world's twenty million forced migrants. In this volume, eighteen scholars provide a wide-ranging, interdisciplinary look beyond the statistics at the experiences of the women, men, girls, and boys who comprise this global flow, and at the highly gendered forces that frame and affect them. In theorizing gender and forced migration, these authors present a set of descriptively rich, gendered case studies drawn from around the world on topics ranging from international human rights, to the culture of aid, to the complex ways in which women and men envision displacement and resettlement.
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Contesting Integration, Engendering Migration

Theory and Practice

Author: F. Anthias,M. Pajnik

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137294000

Category: Social Science

Page: 277

View: 3587

This book aims to further the understanding of migration processes and policies in a European context with a particular focus on evaluating integration and the gendered aspects of migration, integration and citizenship. Integration is regarded as a contested concept and as entailing a variable and problematic set of discourses and practices.
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Driven from Home

Protecting the Rights of Forced Migrants

Author: David Hollenbach, SJ

Publisher: Georgetown University Press

ISBN: 1589016793

Category: Political Science

Page: 296

View: 4848

Throughout human history people have been driven from their homes by wars, unjust treatment, earthquakes, and hurricanes. The reality of forced migration is not new, nor is awareness of the suffering of the displaced a recent discovery. The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees estimates that at the end of 2007 there were 67 million persons in the world who had been forcibly displaced from their homes—including more than 16 million people who had to flee across an international border for fear of being persecuted due to race, religion, nationality, social group, or political opinion. Driven from Home advances the discussion on how best to protect and assist the growing number of persons who have been forced from their homes and proposes a human rights framework to guide political and policy responses to forced migration. This thought-provoking volume brings together contributors from several disciplines, including international affairs, law, ethics, economics, and theology, to advocate for better responses to protect the global community’s most vulnerable citizens.
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Gendering the International Asylum and Refugee Debate

Second Edition

Author: J. Freedman

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 113745623X

Category: Social Science

Page: 246

View: 1220

This revised and updated 2nd edition of Freedman's hard-hitting study aims to remedy the current lack of gender-specific analyses of asylum and refugee issues. It provides a comprehensive account of the situation of women in global forced migration, and explains the ways in which women's experiences are shaped by gendered relations and structures.
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Remaking Home

Reconstructing Life, Place and Identity in Rome and Amsterdam

Author: Maja Korac

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 1845459563

Category: Social Science

Page: 196

View: 8436

Rather than emphasising boundaries and territories by examining the 'integration' and 'acculturation' of the immigrant or the refugee, this book offers insights into the ideas and practices of individuals settling into new societies and cultures. It analyses their ideas of connecting and belonging; their accounts of the past, the present and the future; the interaction and networks of relations; practical strategies; and the different meanings of 'home' and belonging that are constructed in new sociocultural settings. The author uses empirical research to explore the experiences of refugees from the successor states of Yugoslavia, who are struggling to make a home for themselves in Amsterdam and Rome. By explaining how real people navigate through the difficulties of their displacement as well as the numerous scenarios and barriers to their emplacement, the author sheds new light on our understanding of what it is like to be a refugee.
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Mexican Women and the Other Side of Immigration

Engendering Transnational Ties

Author: Luz María Gordillo

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292779038

Category: Social Science

Page: 223

View: 6240

Weaving narratives with gendered analysis and historiography of Mexicans in the Midwest, Mexican Women and the Other Side of Immigration examines the unique transnational community created between San Ignacio Cerro Gordo, Jalisco, and Detroit, Michigan, in the last three decades of the twentieth century, asserting that both the community of origin and the receiving community are integral to an immigrant's everyday life, though the manifestations of this are rife with contradictions. Exploring the challenges faced by this population since the inception of the Bracero Program in 1942 in constantly re-creating, adapting, accommodating, shaping, and creating new meanings of their environments, Luz María Gordillo emphasizes the gender-specific aspects of these situations. While other studies of Mexican transnational identity focus on social institutions, Gordillo's work introduces the concept of transnational sexualities, particularly the social construction of working-class sexuality. Her findings indicate that many female San Ignacians shattered stereotypes, transgressing traditionally male roles while their husbands lived abroad. When the women themselves immigrated as well, these transgressions facilitated their adaptation in Detroit. Placed within the larger context of globalization, Mexican Women and the Other Side of Immigration is a timely excavation of oral histories, archival documents, and the remnants of three decades of memory.
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Against Their Will

The History and Geography of Forced Migrations in the USSR

Author: P. M. Poli?an

Publisher: Central European University Press

ISBN: 9789639241688

Category: Social Science

Page: 425

View: 4476

"During his reign, Joseph Stalin oversaw the forced resettlement of people by the millions - a maniacal passion that he used for social engineering. Six million people were resettled before Stalin's death. This volume is the first attempt to comprehensively examine the history of forced and semi-voluntary population movements within or organized by the Soviet Union. Contents range from the early 1920s to the rehabilitation of repressed nationalities in the 1990s, dealing with internal (kulaks, ethnic and political deportations) and international forced migrations (German internees and occupied territories)."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved
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The Oxford Handbook of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies

Author: Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh,Gil Loescher,Katy Long,Nando Sigona

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191645877

Category: Political Science

Page: 800

View: 4865

Refugee and Forced Migration Studies has grown from being a concern of a relatively small number of scholars and policy researchers in the 1980s to a global field of interest with thousands of students worldwide studying displacement either from traditional disciplinary perspectives or as a core component of newer programmes across the Humanities and Social and Political Sciences. Today the field encompasses both rigorous academic research which may or may not ultimately inform policy and practice, as well as action-research focused on advocating in favour of refugees' needs and rights. This authoritative Handbook critically evaluates the birth and development of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies, and analyses the key contemporary and future challenges faced by academics and practitioners working with and for forcibly displaced populations around the world. The 52 state-of-the-art chapters, written by leading academics, practitioners, and policymakers working in universities, research centres, think tanks, NGOs and international organizations, provide a comprehensive and cutting-edge overview of the key intellectual, political, social and institutional challenges arising from mass displacement in the world today. The chapters vividly illustrate the vibrant and engaging debates that characterise this rapidly expanding field of research and practice.
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Defying Displacement

Grassroots Resistance and the Critique of Development

Author: Anthony Oliver-Smith

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292778880

Category: Social Science

Page: 303

View: 3270

The uprooting and displacement of people has long been among the hardships associated with development and modernity. Indeed, the circulation of commodities, currency, and labor in modern society necessitates both social and spatial mobility. However, the displacement and resettlement of millions of people each year by large-scale infrastructural projects raises serious questions about the democratic character of the development process. Although designed to spur economic growth, many of these projects leave local people struggling against serious impoverishment and gross violations of human rights. Working from a political-ecological perspective, Anthony Oliver-Smith offers the first book to document the fight against involuntary displacement and resettlement being waged by people and communities around the world. Increasingly over the last twenty-five years, the voices of people at the grass roots are being heard. People from many societies and cultures are taking action against development-forced displacement and resettlement (DFDR) and articulating alternatives. Taking the promise of democracy seriously, they are fighting not only for their place in the world, but also for their place at the negotiating table, where decisions affecting their well-being are made.
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Migrations and Mobilities

Citizenship, Borders, and Gender

Author: Seyla Benhabib,Judith Resnik

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814729434

Category: Law

Page: 520

View: 6047

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Engendering Migrant Health

Canadian Perspectives

Author: Denise L. Spitzer

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442661224

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 312

View: 5541

Voluntary migrants to Canada are generally healthier than the average Canadian, but after ten years in the country they report poorer health and higher rates of chronic disease than those born here. Troublingly, women — particularly those from non-European countries — experience the most precipitous decline in health. What contributes to this deterioration, and how can its effects be mitigated? Engendering Migrant Health brings together researchers from across Canada to address the intersections of gender, immigration, and health in the lives of new Canadians. Focusing on the context of Canadian policy and society, the contributors illuminate migrants' testimonies of struggle, resistance, and solidarity as they negotiate a place for themselves in a new country. Topics range from the difficulties of Francophone refugees and the changing roles of fathers, to the experiences of queer newcomers and the importance of social unity to communal and individual health.
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Refugee Status in Islam

Concepts of Protection in Islamic Tradition and International Law

Author: Arafat Madi Shoukri

Publisher: I.B.Tauris

ISBN: 0857718738

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 6826

What are the views, principles and regulations of the Islamic tradition concerning refugee status? Are there any similarities between the Islamic tradition relating to the laws of aman (safe conduct) and the 1951 Geneva Convention relating to the status of refugees?_x000D_ _x000D_ Arafat Shoukri here delves into fifteen centuries of Arab and Islamic history, examining hundreds of ancient sources to establish Islam’s position on refugees._x000D_ _x000D_ To trace the origins of the Islamic concept of aman, Arafat Shoukri goes back to the life of Arabs in the jahiliyya, before the advent of Islam, to explore the idea of jiwar (protection), which was a governing custom at that period. He highlights how the Prophet, the first asylum seeker in Islam, and his Companions exploited jiwar on their journey to establish their state in Medina. More importantly, the author focuses on how the Muslims treated those non-Muslims who sought jiwar in Medina. _x000D_ _x000D_ In order to position aman within the context of an Islamic discourse, the author defines several relevant terms, such as dar alharb, dar al-Islam, mustaj?r, muhajir, musta’min and dhimmi. Noticeably, due to its particular significance, the author undertakes an extensive examination of the different interpretations of the Qur’anic verse (9:6) which is considered to be the cornerstone in legalising the concept of refuge in the Qur’an._x000D_ _x000D_ After establishing the concept of protection and the laws of aman in the Islamic tradition Shoukri examines the 1951 Geneva Convention relating to the status of refugees from the perspective of Islamic tradition - the first scholar to do so. Interestingly, the similarities between the two are very striking - allowing Shoukri to dismiss calls for a specific Islamic convention on refugees. Instead, he concludes by encouraging Arab and Muslim governments to endorse the 1951 Convention.
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Entrapping Asylum Seekers

Social, Legal and Economic Precariousness

Author: Francesco Vecchio,Alison Gerard

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137587393

Category: Social Science

Page: 276

View: 9300

This book is an interdisciplinary attempt to understand the contemporaneous human condition of asylum seekers through analysis of their entrapment and the resultant new forms of resistance that have emerged to combat it. Based on qualitative research data, the chapters support the claim that asylum seekers are entrapped in social, legal and economic precariousness amidst the complex relationship between individual agency and social structure. By exploring the practices and lived experiences of asylum seekers and other parties involved in their migration and reception, the authors explore the structural and individual agency factors that entrap asylum seekers in precarious livelihoods and lead to marginalization and social exclusion. A bold and timely study, this edited collection will be essential reading for academics and students of criminology, sociology, anthropology, urban studies and social policy.
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Human Cargo

A Journey Among Refugees

Author: Caroline Moorehead

Publisher: Henry Holt and Company

ISBN: 9781429900737

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 9895

An arresting portrait of the lives of today's refugees and a searching look into their future The word refugee is more often used to invoke a problem than it is to describe a population of millions of people forced to abandon their homes, possessions, and families in order to find a place where they may, quite literally, be allowed to live. In spite of the fact that refugees surround us-the latest UN estimates suggest that 20 million of the world's 6.3 billion people are refugees-few can grasp the scale of their presence or the implications of their growing numbers. Caroline Moorehead has traveled for nearly two years and across four continents to bring us their unforgettable stories. In prose that is at once affecting and informative, we are introduced to the men, women, and children she meets as she travels to Cairo, Guinea, Sicily, the U.S./Mexico border, Lebanon, England, Australia, and Finland. She explains how she came to work and for a time live among refugees, and why she could not escape the pressing need to understand and describe the chain of often terrifying events that mark their lives. Human Cargo is a work of deep and subtle sympathy that completely alters our understanding of what it means to have and lose a place in the world.
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Life Interrupted

Trafficking into Forced Labor in the United States

Author: Denise Brennan

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822376911

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 555

DIVLife Interrupted introduces us to survivors of human trafficking who are struggling to get by and make homes for themselves in the United States. Having spent nearly a decade following the lives of formerly trafficked men and women, Denise Brennan recounts in close detail their flight from their abusers and their courageous efforts to rebuild their lives. At once scholarly and accessible, her book links these firsthand accounts to global economic inequities and under-regulated and unprotected workplaces that routinely exploit migrant laborers in the United States. Brennan contends that today's punitive immigration policies undermine efforts to fight trafficking. While many believe trafficking happens only in the sex trade, Brennan shows that across low-wage labor sectors—in fields, in factories, and on construction sites—widespread exploitation can lead to and conceal forced labor. Life Interrupted is a riveting account of life in and after trafficking and a forceful call for meaningful immigration and labor reform. All royalties from this book will be donated to the nonprofit Survivor Leadership Training Fund administered through the Freedom Network.
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The Oxford Handbook of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies

Author: Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh,Gil Loescher,Katy Long,Nando Sigona

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191645885

Category: Political Science

Page: 800

View: 9579

Refugee and Forced Migration Studies has grown from being a concern of a relatively small number of scholars and policy researchers in the 1980s to a global field of interest with thousands of students worldwide studying displacement either from traditional disciplinary perspectives or as a core component of newer programmes across the Humanities and Social and Political Sciences. Today the field encompasses both rigorous academic research which may or may not ultimately inform policy and practice, as well as action-research focused on advocating in favour of refugees' needs and rights. This authoritative Handbook critically evaluates the birth and development of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies, and analyses the key contemporary and future challenges faced by academics and practitioners working with and for forcibly displaced populations around the world. The 52 state-of-the-art chapters, written by leading academics, practitioners, and policymakers working in universities, research centres, think tanks, NGOs and international organizations, provide a comprehensive and cutting-edge overview of the key intellectual, political, social and institutional challenges arising from mass displacement in the world today. The chapters vividly illustrate the vibrant and engaging debates that characterise this rapidly expanding field of research and practice.
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The Age of Migration

International Population Movements in the Modern World

Author: Stephen Castles,Mark J. Miller

Publisher: Palgrave MacMillan

ISBN: 9780230517844

Category: Political Science

Page: 369

View: 8859

This edition provides coverage of the nature, extent and dimensions of international population movements and of their consequences in an increasingly multicultural world.
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