Electric Dreamland

Amusement Parks, Movies, and American Modernity

Author: Lauren Rabinovitz

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231156618

Category: Social Science

Page: 237

View: 3562

More than two thousand amusement parks dotted the American landscape in the early twentieth century, thrilling the general public with the latest in entertainment and motion picture technology. Amusement parks were the playgrounds of the working class, combining numerous, mechanically-based spectacles into one unique, modern cultural phenomenon. Lauren Rabinovitz describes the urban modernity engendered by these parks and their media, encouraging ordinary individuals to sense, interpret, and embody a burgeoning national identity. As industrialization, urbanization, and immigration upended society before World War I, amusement parks tempered the shocks of racial, ethnic, and cultural conflict while shrinking the distinctions between gender and class. As she follows the rise of American parks from 1896 to 1918, Rabinovitz seizes on a simultaneous increase in cinema and spectacle audiences and connects both to the success of leisure activities in stabilizing society.
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Der tänzerische Film

Frühe Filmkultur und moderner Tanz.

Author: Kristina Köhler

Publisher: Schüren Verlag

ISBN: 3741000663

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 416

View: 2949

Schon um 1900 beschrieben Besucher früher Filmvorführungen das Flackern auf der Leinwand als "Tanz der Bilder". Die Idee, dass Filme Tanz nicht nur aufzeichnen, sondern selber – über die Projektion, Kamerabewegungen oder Montage – tänzerische Bewegungseffekte freisetzen, zirkuliert seither durch Filmkritik und -theorie. Der Band untersucht die Denkfigur vom tänzerischen Film und zeichnet ihr Entstehen im Kontext der intermedialen Geschichte von früher Filmkultur und modernem Tanz zu Beginn des 20. Jahrhunderts nach. Gezeigt wird, wie das Kino im Kontext von Tanz, Körperkultur und Gymnastik als "Bewegungskunst" modelliert wird und wie es sich – parallel zu und in Wechselwirkung mit dem modernen Tanz – als Praxis und Erfahrungsraum etabliert, an dem neue Formen der Bewegung und Wahrnehmung erprobt werden. Erarbeitet wird ein innovatives Theorie- und Analysemodell, das medienarchäologische Ansätze mit Theorien der Wahrnehmung, Bewegung und Körperlichkeit verknüpft. Dieser Zugriff erlaubt, die Geschichte des tänzerischen Films über ein breites Spektrum an Beispielen in den Blick zu nehmen: an den Tanz- und Trickszenen des frühen Kinos, wissenschaftlichen Bewegungsstudien und Zeitlupen-Aufnahmen, Tanz- und Kulturfilmen, Tanzlehrfilmen, Filmkomödien und Melodramen der 1910er Jahre bis hin zu den ‹absoluten› Experimentalfilmen der frühen 1920er Jahre. Die Zusammenschau verbindet die Analyse der Filme mit den Filmtheorien und Aufführungspraktiken der damaligen Zeit und beleuchtet zentrale Beispiele über eine Fülle bislang unbekannter Archivmaterialien. So entfaltet sich ein faszinierendes Panorama der frühen Filmkultur, das zeigt, wie eng diese im Austausch stand mit Ideen des Tänzerischen der Körper- und Tanzkultur, bildenden Kunst, Philosophie, Physiologie, Bewegungswissenschaft, Lebensreform und populären Unterhaltungskultur. Erstmals in den Blick genommen werden auch die Reaktionen moderner Tänzerinnen und Choreographen wie Isadora Duncan und Loïe Fuller, Rudolf von Laban, Mary Wigman und Gret Palucca auf den Film. Ihre Kommentare, mal polemisch gegen das Kino gewandt, mal euphorische Entwürfe einer intermedialen Bewegungskunst, eröffnen einen ganz eigenen Reflexionsraum auf das damals neue Medium. Im Zentrum ihrer Überlegungen steht die (auch tanztheoretisch relevante) Frage: Wie lässt sich Tanz verstehen, wenn er nicht mehr an den menschlichen Körper gebunden ist? Die entwickelte Theorie vom tänzerischen Film ermöglicht, diese Frage auch für aktuelle Filme – von der ‹Berliner Schule› bis hin zu Spielformen des Screen- und Videodance – zu reflektieren und zu klären, was es heißt, einen Film oder ein Video ‹tänzerisch› zu ‹erfahren›.
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Continental Strangers

German Exile Cinema, 1933-1951

Author: Gerd Gemünden

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231536526

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 3096

Hundreds of German-speaking film professionals took refuge in Hollywood during the 1930s and 1940s, making a lasting contribution to American cinema. Hailing from Austria, Hungary, Poland, Russia, and the Ukraine, as well as Germany, and including Ernst Lubitsch, Fred Zinnemann, Billy Wilder, and Fritz Lang, these multicultural, multilingual writers and directors betrayed distinct cultural sensibilities in their art. Gerd Gemünden focuses on Edgar G. Ulmer's The Black Cat (1934), William Dieterle's The Life of Emile Zola (1937), Ernst Lubitsch's To Be or Not to Be (1942), Bertolt Brecht and Fritz Lang's Hangmen Also Die (1943), Fred Zinnemann's Act of Violence (1948), and Peter Lorre's Der Verlorene (1951), engaging with issues of realism, auteurism, and genre while tracing the relationship between film and history, Hollywood politics and censorship, and exile and (re)migration.
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Motion(less) Pictures

The Cinema of Stasis

Author: Justin Remes

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231538901

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 208

View: 1369

Conducting the first comprehensive study of films that do not move, Justin Remes challenges the primacy of motion in cinema and tests the theoretical limits of film aesthetics and representation. Reading experimental films such as Andy Warhol's Empire (1964), the Fluxus work Disappearing Music for Face (1965), Michael Snow's So Is This (1982), and Derek Jarman's Blue (1993), he shows how motionless films defiantly showcase the static while collapsing the boundaries between cinema, photography, painting, and literature. Analyzing four categories of static film--furniture films, designed to be viewed partially or distractedly; protracted films, which use extremely slow motion to impress stasis; textual films, which foreground the static display of letters and written words; and monochrome films, which display a field of monochrome color as their image--Remes maps the interrelations between movement, stillness, and duration and their complication of cinema's conventional function and effects. Arguing all films unfold in time, he suggests duration is more fundamental to cinema than motion, initiating fresh inquiries into film's manipulation of temporality, from rigidly structured works to those with more ambiguous and open-ended frameworks. Remes's discussion integrates the writings of Roland Barthes, Gilles Deleuze, Tom Gunning, Rudolf Arnheim, Raymond Bellour, and Noel Carroll and will appeal to students of film theory, experimental cinema, intermedia studies, and aesthetics.
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Must We Kill the Thing We Love?

Emersonian Perfectionism and the Films of Alfred Hitchcock

Author: William Rothman

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231537301

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 352

View: 1523

William Rothman argues that the driving force of Hitchcock's work was his struggle to reconcile the dark vision of his favorite Oscar Wilde quote, "Each man kills the thing he loves," with the quintessentially American philosophy, articulated in Emerson's writings, that gave classical Hollywood movies of the New Deal era their extraordinary combination of popularity and artistic seriousness. A Hitchcock thriller could be a comedy of remarriage or a melodrama of an unknown woman, both Emersonian genres, except for the murderous villain and godlike author, Hitchcock, who pulls the villain's strings—and ours. Because Hitchcock believed that the camera has a murderous aspect, the question "What if anything justifies killing?," which every Hitchcock film engages, was for him a disturbing question about his own art. Tracing the trajectory of Hitchcock's career, Rothman discerns a progression in the films' meditations on murder and artistic creation. This progression culminates in Marnie (1964), Hitchcock's most controversial film, in which Hitchcock overcame his ambivalence and fully embraced the Emersonian worldview he had always also resisted. Reading key Emerson passages with the degree of attention he accords to Hitchcock sequences, Rothman discovers surprising affinities between Hitchcock's way of thinking cinematically and the philosophical way of thinking Emerson's essays exemplify. He finds that the terms in which Emerson thought about reality, about our "flux of moods," about what it is within us that never changes, about freedom, about America, about reading, about writing, and about thinking are remarkably pertinent to our experience of films and to thinking and writing about them. He also reflects on the implications of this discovery, not only for Hitchcock scholarship but also for film criticism in general.
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After the Silents

Hollywood Film Music in the Early Sound Era, 1926-1934

Author: Michael Slowik

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231535503

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 352

View: 1260

Many believe Max Steiner's score for King Kong (1933) was the first important attempt at integrating background music into sound film, but a closer look at the industry's early sound era (1926–1934) reveals a more extended and fascinating story. Viewing more than two hundred films from the period, Michael Slowik launches the first comprehensive study of a long-neglected phase in Hollywood's initial development, recasting the history of film sound and its relationship to the "Golden Age" of film music (1935–1950). Slowik follows filmmakers' shifting combinations of sound and image, recapturing the volatility of this era and the variety of film music strategies that were tested, abandoned, and kept. He explores early film music experiments and accompaniment practices in opera, melodrama, musicals, radio, and silent films and discusses the impact of the advent of synchronized dialogue. He concludes with a reassessment of King Kong and its groundbreaking approach to film music, challenging the film's place and importance in the timeline of sound achievement.
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Where Film Meets Philosophy

Godard, Resnais, and Experiments in Cinematic Thinking

Author: Hunter Vaughan

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 023153082X

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 264

View: 6554

Hunter Vaughan interweaves phenomenology and semiotics to analyze cinema's ability to challenge conventional modes of thought. Merging Maurice Merleau-Ponty's phenomenology of perception with Gilles Deleuze's image-philosophy, Vaughan applies a rich theoretical framework to a comparative analysis of Jean-Luc Godard's films, which critique the audio-visual illusion of empirical observation (objectivity), and the cinema of Alain Resnais, in which the sound-image generates innovative portrayals of individual experience (subjectivity). Both filmmakers radically upend conventional film practices and challenge philosophical traditions to alter our understanding of the self, the world, and the relationship between the two. Films discussed in detail include Godard's Vivre sa vie (1962), Contempt (1963), and 2 or 3 Things I Know About Her (1967); and Resnais's Hiroshima, mon amour (1959), Last Year at Marienbad (1961), and The War Is Over (1966). Situating the formative works of these filmmakers within a broader philosophical context, Vaughan pioneers a phenomenological film semiotics linking two disparate methodologies to the mirrored achievements of two seemingly irreconcilable artists.
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The Utopia of Film

Cinema and Its Futures in Godard, Kluge, and Tahimik

Author: Christopher Pavsek

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231530811

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 304

View: 6615

The German filmmaker Alexander Kluge has long promoted cinema's relationship with the goals of human emancipation. Jean-Luc Godard and Filipino director Kidlat Tahimik also believe in cinema's ability to bring about what Theodor W. Adorno once called a "redeemed world." Situating the films of Godard, Tahimik, and Kluge within debates over social revolution, utopian ideals, and the unrealized potential of utopian thought and action, Christopher Pavsek showcases the strengths, weaknesses, and undeniable impact of their utopian visions on film's political evolution. He discusses Godard's Alphaville (1965) against Germany Year 90 Nine-Zero (1991) and JLG/JLG: Self-portrait in December (1994), and he conducts the first scholarly reading of Film Socialisme (2010). He considers Tahimik's virtually unknown masterpiece, I Am Furious Yellow (1981–1991), along with Perfumed Nightmare (1977) and Turumba (1983); and he constructs a dialogue between Kluge's Brutality in Stone (1961) and Yesterday Girl (1965) and his later The Assault of the Present on the Rest of Time (1985) and Fruits of Trust (2009).
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A Coney Island Reader

Through Dizzy Gates of Illusion

Author: Louis J. Parascandola,John Parascandola

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231538197

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 8839

Featuring a stunning gallery of portraits by the world's finest poets, essayists, and fiction writers--including Walt Whitman, Stephen Crane, José Martí, Maxim Gorky, Federico García Lorca, Isaac Bashevis Singer, E. E. Cummings, Djuna Barnes, Colson Whitehead, Robert Olen Butler, and Katie Roiphe--this anthology is the first to focus on the unique history and transporting experience of a beloved fixture of the New York City landscape. Moody, mystical, and enchanting, Coney Island has thrilled newcomers and soothed native New Yorkers for decades. With its fantasy entertainments, renowned beach foods, world-class boardwalk, and expansive beach, it provides a welcome respite from the city's dense neighborhoods, unrelenting traffic, and somber grid. Coney Island has long offered a kaleidoscopic panorama of people, places, and events, creating, as Lawrence Ferlinghetti once wrote, "a Coney Island of the mind." This anthology captures the highs and lows of that sensation, with works that imagine Coney Island as a restful resort, a playground for the masses, and a symbol of America's democratic spirit, as well as a Sodom by the sea, a garish display of capitalist excess, and a paradigm of urban decay. As complex as the city of which it is a part, Coney Island engenders limitless perspectives, a composite inspiring everyone who encounters it to sing its electric song.
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The Lumière Galaxy

Seven Key Words for the Cinema to Come

Author: Francesco Casetti

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231538871

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 304

View: 7405

Francesco Casetti believes new media technologies are producing an exciting new era in cinema aesthetics. Whether we experience film in the theater, on our hand-held devices, in galleries and museums, onboard and in flight, or up in the clouds in the bits we download, cinema continues to alter our habits and excite our imaginations. Casetti travels from the remote corners of film history and theory to the most surprising sites on the internet and in our cities to prove the ongoing relevance of cinema. He does away with traditional notions of canon, repetition, apparatus, and spectatorship in favor of new keywords, including expansion, relocation, assemblage, and performance. The result is an innovative understanding of cinema's place in our lives and culture, along with a critical sea-change in the study of the art. The more the nature of cinema transforms, the more it discovers its own identity, and Casetti helps readers realize the galaxy of possibilities embedded in the medium.
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Hollywood and Hitler, 1933-1939

Author: Thomas Doherty

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231535147

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 7201

Between 1933 and 1939, representations of the Nazis and the full meaning of Nazism came slowly to Hollywood, growing more ominous and distinct only as the decade wore on. Recapturing what ordinary Americans saw on the screen during the emerging Nazi threat, Thomas Doherty reclaims forgotten films, such as Hitler's Reign of Terror (1934), a pioneering anti-Nazi docudrama by Cornelius Vanderbilt Jr.; I Was a Captive of Nazi Germany (1936), a sensational true tale of "a Hollywood girl in Naziland!"; and Professor Mamlock (1938), an anti-Nazi film made by German refugees living in the Soviet Union. Doherty also recounts how the disproportionately Jewish backgrounds of the executives of the studios and the workers on the payroll shaded reactions to what was never simply a business decision. As Europe hurtled toward war, a proxy battle waged in Hollywood over how to conduct business with the Nazis, how to cover Hitler and his victims in the newsreels, and whether to address or ignore Nazism in Hollywood feature films. Should Hollywood lie low, or stand tall and sound the alarm? Doherty's history features a cast of charismatic personalities: Carl Laemmle, the German Jewish founder of Universal Pictures, whose production of All Quiet on the Western Front (1930) enraged the nascent Nazi movement; Georg Gyssling, the Nazi consul in Los Angeles, who read the Hollywood trade press as avidly as any studio mogul; Vittorio Mussolini, son of the fascist dictator and aspiring motion picture impresario; Leni Riefenstahl, the Valkyrie goddess of the Third Reich who came to America to peddle distribution rights for Olympia (1938); screenwriters Donald Ogden Stewart and Dorothy Parker, founders of the Hollywood Anti-Nazi League; and Harry and Jack Warner of Warner Bros., who yoked anti-Nazism to patriotic Americanism and finally broke the embargo against anti-Nazi cinema with Confessions of a Nazi Spy (1939).
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New Tunisian Cinema

Allegories of Resistance

Author: Robert Lang

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231537190

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 448

View: 650

Tunisian cinema is often described as the most daring of all Arab cinemas. For many, Tunisia appeared to be a model of equipoise between "East" and "West," and yet, during Zine El Abidine Ben Ali's presidency, from 1987 to 2011, the country became the most repressive state in the Maghreb. Against considerable odds, a generation of filmmakers emerged in the mid-1980s to make films that are allegories of resistance to the increasingly illiberal trends that were marking their society. In New Tunisian Cinema, Robert Lang focuses on eight films by some of the nation's best-known directors, including Man of Ashes (1986), Bezness (1992) and Making Of (2006) by Nouri Bouzid, Halfaouine (1990) by Férid Boughedir, The Silences of the Palace (1994) by Moufida Tlatli, Essaïda (1997) by Mohamed Zran, Bedwin Hacker (2002) by Nadia El Fani, and The TV Is Coming (2006) by Moncef Dhouib. He explores the political economy and social, historical, and psychoanalytic dimensions of these works and the strategies filmmakers deployed to preserve cinema's ability to shape debates about national identity. These debates, Lang argues, not only helped initiate the 2011 uprising that ousted Ben Ali's regime but also did much to inform and articulate the aspirations of the Tunisian people in the new millennium.
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The Electrical Review

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Electrical engineering

Page: N.A

View: 2657

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The Pyrotechnic Insanitarium

American Culture on the Brink

Author: Mark Dery

Publisher: Open Road + Grove/Atlantic

ISBN: 0802196128

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 7575

A wide-ranging collection of essays on millennial American culture that “marshals a vast pop vocabulary with easy wit” (The New York Times Book Review). From the far left to the far right, on talk radio and the op-ed page, more and more Americans believe that the social fabric is unraveling. Celebrity worship and media frenzy, suicidal cultists and heavily armed secessionists: modern life seems to have become a “pyrotechnic insanitarium,” Mark Dery says, borrowing a turn-of-the-century name for Coney Island. Dery elucidates the meaning to our madness, deconstructing American culture from mainstream forces like Disney and Nike to fringe phenomena like the Unabomber and alien invaders. Our millennial angst, he argues, is a product of a pervasive cultural anxiety—a combination of the social and economic upheaval wrought by global capitalism and the paranoia fanned by media sensationalism. The Pyrotechnic Insanitarium is a theme-park ride through the extremes of American culture of which The Atlantic Monthly has written, “Mark Dery confirms once again what writers and thinkers as disparate as Nathanael West, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Sigmund Freud, and Oliver Sacks have already shown us: the best place to explore the human condition is at its outer margins, its pathological extremes.” “Dery is the kind of critic who just might give conspiracy theory a good name.” —Wired
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Radio Times

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

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Annual Report

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Factory inspection

Page: N.A

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Electrical Times

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Electric engineering

Page: N.A

View: 5967

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