Dickens’s ‘Young Men’

George Augustus Sala, Edmund Yates and the World of Victorian Journalism

Author: P.D. Edwards

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351944355

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 5019

In Dickens's lifetime, and for a generation or so after, Edmund Hodgson Yates and George Augustus Sala were the best known and most successful of his "young men" - the budding writers who acknowledged him as their guide and mentor and whose literary careers the publicity and privately fostered. The book considers their personal and literary relationships with Dickens, with each other, and with other writers of the period, Bohemian and "respectable", including Yates's arch-enemy, his post-office colleague Anthony Trollope. But it also demonstrates that their life and writings - their fiction, private letters and occasional essays in verse and drama, as well as their already recognised contributions to the development of the "new journalism" - are interesting and historically illuminating in their own right, not merely pale reflections of the glory of greater writers. Extensive use is made of previously unpublished material.
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Journalism and the Periodical Press in Nineteenth-Century Britain

Author: Joanne Shattock

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 110708573X

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 448

View: 1873

Newly commissioned essays by leading scholars offer a comprehensive and authoritative overview of the diversity, range and impact of the newspaper and periodical press in nineteenth-century Britain. Essays range from studies of periodical formats in the nineteenth century - reviews, magazines and newspapers - to accounts of individual journalists, many of them eminent writers of the day. The uneasy relationship between the new 'profession' of journalism and the evolving profession of authorship is investigated, as is the impact of technological innovations, such as the telegraph, the typewriter and new processes of illustration. Contributors go on to consider the transnational and global dimensions of the British press and its impact in the rest of the world. As digitisation of historical media opens up new avenues of research, the collection reveals the centrality of the press to our understanding of the nineteenth century.
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The Routledge Handbook to Nineteenth-Century British Periodicals and Newspapers

Author: Andrew King,Alexis Easley,John Morton

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317042301

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 476

View: 7436

Providing a comprehensive, interdisciplinary examination of scholarship on nineteenth-century British periodicals, this volume surveys the current state of research and offers researchers an in-depth examination of contemporary methodologies. The impact of digital media and archives on the field informs all discussions of the print archive. Contributors illustrate their arguments with examples and contextualize their topics within broader areas of study, while also reflecting on how the study of periodicals may evolve in the future. The Handbook will serve as a valuable resource for scholars and students of nineteenth-century culture who are interested in issues of cultural formation, transformation, and transmission in a developing industrial and globalizing age, as well as those whose research focuses on the bibliographical and the micro case study. In addition to rendering a comprehensive review and critique of current research on nineteenth-century British periodicals, the Handbook suggests new avenues for research in the twenty-first century.
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George Augustus Sala and the Nineteenth-Century Periodical Press

The Personal Style of a Public Writer

Author: Peter Blake

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 131712877X

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 296

View: 3377

In his study of the journalist George Augustus Sala, Peter Blake discusses the way Sala’s personal style, along with his innovations in form, influenced the New Journalism at the end of the nineteenth century. Blake places Sala at the centre of nineteenth-century newspapers and periodicals and examines his prolific contributions to newspapers and periodicals in the context of contemporary debates and issues surrounding his work. Sala’s journalistic style, Blake argues, was a product of the very different mediums in which he worked, whether it was the visual arts, bohemian journalism, novels, pornographic plays, or travel writing. Harkening back to a time when journalism and fiction were closely connected, Blake’s book not only expands our understanding of one of the more prominent and interesting journalists and personalities of the nineteenth century, but also sheds light on prominent nineteenth-century writers and artists such as Charles Dickens, Mathew Arnold, William Powell Frith, Henry Vizetelly, and Mary Elizabeth Braddon.
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Rachel Ray

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 8992

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Celebrities at Home

Author: Edmund Yates

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography

Page: N.A

View: 318

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Books in Print

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: American literature

Page: N.A

View: 5043

Books in print is the major source of information on books currently published and in print in the United States. The database provides the record of forthcoming books, books in-print, and books out-of-print.
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The Literature of Struggle

An Anthology of Chartist Fiction

Author: Ian Haywood

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351886606

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 9792

At its height, during the 1830s and 40s, Chartism inspired a prodigious literary output, based on its own newspapers and journals. While some Chartist political writings have been reprinted, the fiction of the movement has been largely neglected. Chartist stories represent a unique moment in literary history, when the radical political energies of a mass movement were fused with popular narrative forms. The result was a vital, accessible and popular fiction, informed by an awareness that Chartism had to forge its own brand of fiction in order to challenge the prevailing cultural misrepresentation of the working class and radical politics. This anthology is organised chronologically and includes a wide range of authors and genres, with complete poems and short stories as well as extracts from novels and other full-length works of fiction. The stories are divided into five areas which relect the range, scope and achievement of Chartism's intellectual and political imagination: the condition of England; Ireland; revolution; women and Chartism. The complete collection is set in an analytical framework and has a long historical introduction by the editor.
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Dickens, Reynolds, and Mayhew on Wellington Street

The Print Culture of a Victorian Street

Author: Mary L. Shannon

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317151143

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 278

View: 8962

A glance over the back pages of mid-nineteenth-century newspapers and periodicals published in London reveals that Wellington Street stands out among imprint addresses. Between 1843 and 1853, Household Words, Reynolds’s Weekly Newspaper, the Examiner, Punch, the Athenaeum, the Spectator, the Morning Post, and the serial edition of London Labour and the London Poor, to name a few, were all published from this short street off the Strand. Mary L. Shannon identifies, for the first time, the close proximity of the offices of Charles Dickens, G.W.M. Reynolds, and Henry Mayhew, examining the ramifications for the individual authors and for nineteenth-century publishing. What are the implications of Charles Dickens, his arch-competitor the radical publisher G.W.M. Reynolds, and Henry Mayhew being such close neighbours? Given that London was capital of more than Britain alone, what connections does Wellington Street reveal between London print networks and the print culture and networks of the wider empire? How might the editors’ experiences make us rethink the ways in which they and others addressed their anonymous readers as ’friends’, as if they were part of their immediate social network? As Shannon shows, readers in the London of the 1840s and '50s, despite advances in literacy, print technology, and communications, were not simply an ’imagined community’ of individuals who read in silent privacy, but active members of an imagined network that punctured the anonymity of the teeming city and even the empire.
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Forthcoming Books

Author: Rose Arny

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: American literature

Page: N.A

View: 3125

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A Journey Due North

Being Notes of a Residence in Russia in the Summer of 1856

Author: George Augustus Sala

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Russia

Page: 378

View: 5351

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Dickens and Popular Entertainment

Author: Paul Schlicke

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134997256

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 4317

Dickens and Popular Entertainment is the first extended study of this vital aspect of Dicken's life and work. Ranging widely through showmen's memoirs, playbills, advertisements, journals, drawings and imaginative literature, Paul Schlicke explores the ways in which Dickens channelled his love of entertainment into incomparable artistry. Circus, fair, theatre and street performances provided the novelist with subject matter and with the sources of imaginative stimulus essential to his art. Splendidly illustrated with nineteenth-century engravings, many reprinted here for the first time, this study offers a challenging reassessment of Nicholas Nickleby, The Old Curiosity Shop and Hard Times. It shows the important place entertainment held in Dicken's journalism and presents an illuminating perspective on the public readings which dominated the last twelve years of his life.
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My Toy! My Toy! My Toy!

Author: P. D. Edwards

Publisher: Virtual Bookworm.Com Pub Incorporated

ISBN: 9781602641327

Category: Fiction

Page: 236

View: 7122

A thought-provoking, seldom told story about a love affair between a man and a woman with a secret. "My Toy" is a human-interest story that details the difficulty of living a double life and the importance of the image of a happy marriage in modern society-which all too often is a story of deception born of necessity. The story takes place in Athens and San Francisco with contrasting views of Greek and American cultures and sub-cultures.
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