Death in Salem

The Private Lives behind the 1692 Witch Hunt

Author: Diane Foulds

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 0762766409

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 4579

Salem witchcraft will always have a magnetic pull on the American psyche. During the 1692 witch trials, more than 150 people were arrested. An estimated 25 million Americans—including author Diane Foulds—are descended from the twenty individuals executed. What happened to our ancestors? Death in Salem is the first book to take a clear-eyed look at this complex time, by examining the lives of the witch trial participants from a personal perspective. Massachusetts settlers led difficult lives; every player in the Salem drama endured hardships barely imaginable today. Mercy Short, one of the “bewitched” girls, watched as Indians butchered her parents; Puritan minister Cotton Mather outlived all but three of his fifteen children. Such tragedies shaped behavior and, as Foulds argues, ultimately played a part in the witch hunt’s outcome. A compelling “who’s who” to Salem witchcraft, Death in Salem profiles each of these historical personalities as it asks: Why was this person targeted?
Release

Death in Salem

The Private Lives behind the 1692 Witch Hunt

Author: Diane E. Foulds

Publisher: Globe Pequot

ISBN: 9780762784974

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 288

View: 1311

Salem witchcraft will always have a magnetic pull on the American psyche. During the 1692 witch trials, more than 150 people were arrested. An estimated 25 million Americans—including author Diane Foulds—are descended from the twenty individuals executed. What happened to our ancestors? Death in Salem is the first book to take a clear-eyed look at this complex time, by examining the lives of the witch trial participants from a personal perspective. Massachusetts settlers led difficult lives; every player in the Salem drama endured hardships barely imaginable today. Mercy Short, one of the “bewitched” girls, watched as Indians butchered her parents; Puritan minister Cotton Mather outlived all but three of his fifteen children. Such tragedies shaped behavior and, as Foulds argues, ultimately played a part in the witch hunt’s outcome. A compelling “who’s who” to Salem witchcraft, Death in Salem profiles each of these historical personalities as it asks: Why was this person targeted?
Release

Death in Salem

The Private Lives Behind the 1692 Witch Hunt

Author: Diane E. Foulds

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780762759095

Category: History

Page: 279

View: 4723

During the 1692 witch trials, more than 150 people were arrested. An estimated 25 million Americans—including author Diane Foulds—are descended from the twenty individuals executed. What happened to our ancestors? Death in Salem is the first book to take a clear-eyed look at this complex time, by examining the lives of the witch trial participants from a personal perspective.
Release

The Salem Witch Trials

A Day-by-day Chronicle of a Community Under Siege

Author: Marilynne K. Roach

Publisher: Taylor Trade Publications

ISBN: 9781589791329

Category: History

Page: 688

View: 6172

The Salem Witch Trials is based on over twenty-five years of archival research--including the author's discovery of previously unknown documents--newly found cases and court records. From January 1692 to January 1697 this history unfolds a nearly day-by-day narrative of the crisis as the citizens of New England experienced it.
Release

Escaping Salem

The Other Witch Hunt of 1692

Author: Richard Godbeer

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0195161297

Category: History

Page: 177

View: 9325

Describes the witch hunt that took place in Stamford, Connecticut, in 1692, detailing the story of Kate Branch, a seventeen-year-old afflicted by strange visions and given to wails of pain and fright, who accused several women of bewitching her.
Release

Witches

The Absolutely True Tale of Disaster in Salem

Author: Rosalyn Schanzer

Publisher: National Geographic Books

ISBN: 1426308884

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 144

View: 2503

Tackling the same twisted subject as Stacy Schiff's much-lauded book The Witches: Salem, 1692, this Sibert Honor book for young readers features unique scratchboard illustrations, chilling primary source material, and powerful narrative to tell the true tale. In the little colonial town of Salem Village, Massachusetts, two girls began to twitch, mumble, and contort their bodies into strange shapes. The doctor tried every remedy, but nothing cured the young Puritans. He grimly announced the dire diagnosis: the girls were bewitched! And then the accusations began. The riveting, true story of the victims, accused witches, crooked officials, and mass hysteria that turned a mysterious illness affecting two children into a witch hunt that took over a dozen people’s lives and ruined hundreds more unfolds in chilling, novelistic detail—complete with stylized black-white-and-red scratchboard illustrations of young girls having wild fits in the courtroom, witches flying overhead, and the Devil and his servants terrorizing the Puritans— in this young adult book by award-winning author and illustrator Rosalyn Schanzer. Taught in middle and high schools around the U.S., the 17th-century saga remains hauntingly resonant as people struggle even today with the urgent need to find someone to blame for their misfortunes. Witches! has been honored with many prestigious awards, including:. Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Honor Book 2012 Notable Children's Books—ALSC NCSS—Notable Social Studies Trade Books in the Field of Social Studies 2012 School Library Journal Best Books of 2011 SLJ’s 100 Magnificent Children’s Books of 2011 Chicago Public Library Best of the Best 2011 From the Hardcover edition.
Release

The Witches

Salem, 1692

Author: Stacy Schiff

Publisher: Little, Brown

ISBN: 0316200611

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 1731

The Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Cleopatra, the #1 national bestseller, unpacks the mystery of the Salem Witch Trials. It began in 1692, over an exceptionally raw Massachusetts winter, when a minister's daughter began to scream and convulse. It ended less than a year later, but not before 19 men and women had been hanged and an elderly man crushed to death. The panic spread quickly, involving the most educated men and prominent politicians in the colony. Neighbors accused neighbors, parents and children each other. Aside from suffrage, the Salem Witch Trials represent the only moment when women played the central role in American history. In curious ways, the trials would shape the future republic. As psychologically thrilling as it is historically seminal, THE WITCHES is Stacy Schiff's account of this fantastical story-the first great American mystery unveiled fully for the first time by one of our most acclaimed historians.
Release

The sermon notebook of Samuel Parris, 1689-1694

Author: Samuel Parris,James Fenimore Cooper,Kenneth P. Minkema

Publisher: Colonial Society of

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 323

View: 2181

Illuminating both the cultural context of the hysteria and the minister's struggles with his congregation, The Sermon Notebook of Samuel Parris stands as one of the most important primary sources relating to the Salem witchcraft episode.
Release

Death in Salem

A Mystery

Author: Eleanor Kuhns

Publisher: Minotaur Books

ISBN: 1466874945

Category: Fiction

Page: 336

View: 5032

It's 1796, and traveling weaver Will Rees is visiting Salem, Massachusetts. He's in town to buy a luxurious gift for his pregnant wife, a few yards of well-made fabric from the traders at the famed Salem harbor. While traveling through Salem, however, Rees comes upon a funeral procession for the deceased Mrs. Antiss Boothe. When Rees happens upon Twig, a friend who fought alongside him in the war, he learns that Mrs. Boothe had been very ill, and her death had not come as a surprise. But the next morning, the town is abuzz with the news that Mr. Boothe has also died—and this time it is clearly murder. When the woman that Twig loves falls under suspicion, Twig persuades Rees to stay in Salem, despite the family waiting for him back home in Maine, and help solve the murder. Rees is quickly pulled into the murky politics of both Salem and the Boothe family, who have long been involved in the robust shipping and trading industry on the Salem harbor. Everyone Rees meets seems to be keeping some kind of secret, but could any of them actually have committed murder? Will Rees returns in Death in Salem, the next delightful historical mystery from MB/MWA First Novel Competition winner Eleanor Kuhns.
Release

A Storm of Witchcraft

The Salem Trials and the American Experience

Author: Emerson W. Baker

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199385149

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 304

View: 2876

Beginning in January 1692, Salem Village in colonial Massachusetts witnessed the largest and most lethal outbreak of witchcraft in early America. Villagers--mainly young women--suffered from unseen torments that caused them to writhe, shriek, and contort their bodies, complaining of pins stuck into their flesh and of being haunted by specters. Believing that they suffered from assaults by an invisible spirit, the community began a hunt to track down those responsible for the demonic work. The resulting Salem Witch Trials, culminating in the execution of 19 villagers, persists as one of the most mysterious and fascinating events in American history. Historians have speculated on a web of possible causes for the witchcraft that stated in Salem and spread across the region-religious crisis, ergot poisoning, an encephalitis outbreak, frontier war hysteria--but most agree that there was no single factor. Rather, as Emerson Baker illustrates in this seminal new work, Salem was "a perfect storm": a unique convergence of conditions and events that produced something extraordinary throughout New England in 1692 and the following years, and which has haunted us ever since. Baker shows how a range of factors in the Bay colony in the 1690s, including a new charter and government, a lethal frontier war, and religious and political conflicts, set the stage for the dramatic events in Salem. Engaging a range of perspectives, he looks at the key players in the outbreak--the accused witches and the people they allegedly bewitched, as well as the judges and government officials who prosecuted them--and wrestles with questions about why the Salem tragedy unfolded as it did, and why it has become an enduring legacy. Salem in 1692 was a critical moment for the fading Puritan government of Massachusetts Bay, whose attempts to suppress the story of the trials and erase them from memory only fueled the popular imagination. Baker argues that the trials marked a turning point in colonial history from Puritan communalism to Yankee independence, from faith in collective conscience to skepticism toward moral governance. A brilliantly told tale, A Storm of Witchcraft also puts Salem's storm into its broader context as a part of the ongoing narrative of American history and the history of the Atlantic World.
Release

A Witch in the Family

An Award-Winning Author Investigates His Ancestor's Trial and Execution, Second Edition

Author: Stephen Hawley Martin

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 9781545004678

Category:

Page: 234

View: 5744

Findings by University of Virginia researchers have compelled award-winning author Stephen Hawley Martin to reconsider what led to the 1692 witch hysteria that ravaged the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Hence this new edition of his Amazon 4.5-star-rated book first published in 2006. Martin writes that now, after 325 years, the discovery by U.Va. provides the missing piece of the puzzle that makes the others fall into place. Nineteen were hanged, including the author's seven-times-great grandmother, one was crushed to death, and five died in prison. Why? Were the so-called "afflicted" faking their symptoms as many historians maintain? Martin didn't think so in 2006, and he does not think so now. He pursues several avenues of investigation that include the remarkable power of belief, the possibility indicated by quantum physics experiments that thought creates reality, and arrives at an explanation thought to be impossible until the U.Va. findings were released. "A Witch in the Family" is nothing less than a riveting, real-life murder mystery-the ultimate reality show no one who wants to know the truth should miss.
Release

The Emancipation of Giles Corey

Author: Michael Sortomme

Publisher: Singing Lake Press

ISBN: 9780983051756

Category: Fiction

Page: 348

View: 9102

"A unique twist on the murder of the only person to die by crushing in the Salem Witch Trials. Dead-on accurate in its depiction of rituals both harming and healing, and respectful of spiritual tradition and historical fact, this book stands alongside Kathleen Kent's The "Heretic's Daughter" as a must-read for anyone fascinated by Salem's past."-Maura D. Shaw, coauthor of "Celebrating the Great Mother" and "Tarot Games"Thriller, spiritual mystery, historical fiction ... or truth revealed?Twenty-first-century Salem still guarded the secrets of lies and violence, torture and blackmail-even premeditated murder-that took place during the Witch Trials of 1692. Behind the gaudy museums and shops, the crowded bus tours of local haunts, the seemingly upright Colonial families dating back to the settling of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, festered a conspiracy of longstanding guilt and purely human greed. Only one woman knew of the Family Confederacy-Sophie St. Cloud, whose connection to the Salem Witch Trials is part magickal, part personal. Sophie's dreams and hauntings have told her that the time has come to end the threat of the Confederacy and free the murdered souls of Salem after 315 years. With the aid of three friends, also mysteriously connected to Salem's past tragedies, she sets out on a perilous, exacting pilgrimage of Emancipation.The name of Giles Corey is familiar to anyone who knows the terrible story of the persecution and trials of those unfortunates who were accused of witchcraft in Essex County in 1692. Refusing to admit guilt, the elderly farmer was pressed under heavy stones and then beaten to death. His wife Martha hung soon thereafter, in the last group of executions before the trials were stopped. Every September, a secret ritual was performed by members of the conspiracy to keep Giles restrained in this world, unable to move to the next. Sophie St. Cloud must use all her spiritual and shamanic powers to defeat the evil and bring the good to Light in Salem's most historical graveyards.Michael Sortomme, writer and artist, embarked on a spiritual career that spanned more than three decades and encompassed metaphysics, the occult arts, and active indigenous Shamanic practice. Educated in archeology and modern literature, she has journeyed in pursuit of Truth that she translates into vivid paintings and equally compelling stories. Currently on hiatus from private practice and community service, Michael is focusing on her life as an author and multi-media artist. She lives and creates under a 150-year-old Larch tree in Oregon's Pinot noir country. Her passions include herstory, genetic genealogy, international travel, and fine dark chocolate. Contact her through her website, www.michaelsortomme.com
Release

The Enemy Within

2,000 Years of Witch-hunting in the Western World

Author: John Demos

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9780670019991

Category: History

Page: 318

View: 2505

A cultural history of witch-hunting from the ancient world through the McCarthy era traces the factors that contribute to outbreaks of cultural paranoia and how people were able to accept hysteria-based beliefs about unlikely supernatural powers and occult activities. 35,000 first printing.
Release

A Season with the Witch: The Magic and Mayhem of Halloween in Salem, Massachusetts

Author: J. W. Ocker

Publisher: The Countryman Press

ISBN: 1581575548

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 240

View: 7303

Edgar Award-winning travel writer spends an autumn living in one of America's spookiest tourist destinations: Salem, Massachusetts Salem, Massachusetts, may be the strangest city on the planet. A single event in its 400 years of history—the Salem Witch Trials of 1692—transformed it into the Capital of Creepy in America. But Salem is a seasonal town—and its season happens to be Halloween. Every October, this small city of 40,000 swells to close to half a million as witches, goblins, ghouls, and ghosts (and their admirers) descend on Essex Street. For the fall of 2015, occult enthusiast and Edgar Award–winning writer J.W. Ocker moved his family of four to downtown Salem to experience firsthand a season with the witch, visiting all of its historical sites and macabre attractions. In between, he interviews its leaders and citizens, its entrepreneurs and visitors, its street performers and Wiccans, its psychics and critics, creating a picture of this unique place and the people who revel in, or merely weather, its witchiness.
Release

The Salem Witch Trials Reader

Author: Frances Hill

Publisher: Da Capo Press

ISBN: 0786748389

Category: History

Page: 440

View: 9500

Against the backdrop of a Puritan theocracy threatened by change, in a population terrified not only of eternal damnation but of the earthly dangers of Indian massacres and recurrent smallpox epidemics, a small group of girls denounces a black slave and others as worshipers of Satan. Within two years, twenty men and women are hanged or pressed to death and over a hundred others imprisoned and impoverished. In The Salem Witch Trials Reader, Frances Hill provides and astutely comments upon the actual documents from the trial--examinations of suspected witches, eyewitness accounts of "Satanic influence," as well as the testimony of those who retained their reason and defied the madness. Always drawing on firsthand documents, she illustrates the historical background to the witchhunt and shows how the trials have been represented, and sometimes distorted, by historians--and how they have fired the imaginations of poets, playwrights, and novelists. For those fascinated by the Salem witch trials, this is compelling reading and the sourcebook.
Release

Salem Witch Judge

The Life and Repentance of Samuel Sewall

Author: Eve LaPlante

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0061753475

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 2004

In 1692 Puritan Samuel Sewall sent twenty people to their deaths on trumped-up witchcraft charges. The nefarious witch trials in Salem, Massachusetts represent a low point of American history, made famous in works by Longfellow, Nathaniel Hawthorne (himself a descendant of one of the judges), and Arthur Miller. The trials might have doomed Sewall to infamy except for a courageous act of contrition now commemorated in a mural that hangs beneath the golden dome of the Massachusetts State House picturing Sewall's public repentance. He was the only Salem witch judge to make amends. But, remarkably, the judge's story didn't end there. Once he realized his error, Sewall turned his attention to other pressing social issues. Struck by the injustice of the New England slave trade, a commerce in which his own relatives and neighbors were engaged, he authored "The Selling of Joseph," America's first antislavery tract. While his peers viewed Native Americans as savages, Sewall advocated for their essential rights and encouraged their education, even paying for several Indian youths to attend Harvard College. Finally, at a time when women were universally considered inferior to men, Sewall published an essay affirming the fundamental equality of the sexes. The text of that essay, composed at the deathbed of his daughter Hannah, is republished here for the first time. In Salem Witch Judge, acclaimed biographer Eve LaPlante, Sewall's great-great-great-great-great-great-granddaughter, draws on family lore, her ancestor's personal diaries, and archival documents to open a window onto life in colonial America, painting a portrait of a man traditionally vilified, but who was in fact an innovator and forefather who came to represent the best of the American spirit.
Release

The Afflicted Girls

Author: Suzy Witten

Publisher: THE AFFLICTED GIRLS

ISBN: N.A

Category: Fiction

Page: 456

View: 380

Something terrible happened in Salem in 1692 . . . but it isn't what you think THE AFFLICTED GIRLS A Novel of Salem by author-researcher Suzy Witten presents a startling new theory of the Salem Village witch-hunts which is certain to put this 300 year old unsettled mystery to rest . . . by expertly guiding readers through The Historical Record to revelation. Part parable, part star-crossed romance, and part supernatural venture, this is an intuitive human history--and inhuman--spun with a modern twist. A controversial debut by a new Historical storyteller. A Walt Disney Studios Fellowship Finalist. Historical Fiction, 456 pages, A Paperback Original (also available as an eBook) from Dreamwand www.theafflictedgirls.com
Release

In the Devil's Snare

The Salem Witchcraft Crisis of 1692

Author: Mary Beth Norton

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 9780307426369

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 5665

Award-winning historian Mary Beth Norton reexamines the Salem witch trials in this startlingly original, meticulously researched, and utterly riveting study. In 1692 the people of Massachusetts were living in fear, and not solely of satanic afflictions. Horrifyingly violent Indian attacks had all but emptied the northern frontier of settlers, and many traumatized refugees—including the main accusers of witches—had fled to communities like Salem. Meanwhile the colony’s leaders, defensive about their own failure to protect the frontier, pondered how God’s people could be suffering at the hands of savages. Struck by the similarities between what the refugees had witnessed and what the witchcraft “victims” described, many were quick to see a vast conspiracy of the Devil (in league with the French and the Indians) threatening New England on all sides. By providing this essential context to the famous events, and by casting her net well beyond the borders of Salem itself, Norton sheds new light on one of the most perplexing and fascinating periods in our history. From the Trade Paperback edition.
Release

Invisible World

Author: Suzanne Weyn

Publisher: Scholastic Inc.

ISBN: 0545443008

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 240

View: 9505

Suzanne Weyn brings her trademark mix of history, romance, and the supernatural to the Salem Witch Trials. Elsabeth James has powers she doesn't fully understand. She is descended from midwives, mind readers, and a fortune-teller who was put to death because she foresaw the death of Mary, Queen of Scots. She can hear people's thoughts and sometimes see what they see. She has supernatural gifts, but not evil ones. When Elsabeth sails with her sister, father, and governess to America, however, she does not foresee that their ship will be wrecked in a storm. Alone for the first time in her life, she washes up on a South Carolina plantation, where she falls in love with a boy she meets there and learns magic and healing from an unexpected source. As her powers grow, her stay is cut short, and she is sent as a servant to Salem, Massachusetts. There she accidentally allows an evil spirit to enter the village. When a group of girls start to say they're bewitched and accuse villagers of witchcraft, Elsabeth must find some way to save herself and the boy she loves.
Release

Six Women of Salem

The Untold Story of the Accused and Their Accusers in the Salem Witch Trials

Author: Marilynne K. Roach

Publisher: Da Capo Press

ISBN: 0306822342

Category: History

Page: 472

View: 6826

Six Women of Salem is the first work to use the lives of a select number of representative women as a microcosm to illuminate the larger crisis of the Salem witch trials. By the end of the trials, beyond the twenty who were executed and the five who perished in prison, 207 individuals had been accused, 74 had been “afflicted,” 32 had officially accused their fellow neighbors, and 255 ordinary people had been inexorably drawn into that ruinous and murderous vortex, and this doesn't include the religious, judicial, and governmental leaders. All this adds up to what the Rev. Cotton Mather called “a desolation of names.” The individuals involved are too often reduced to stock characters and stereotypes when accuracy is sacrificed to indignation. And although the flood of names and detail in the history of an extraordinary event like the Salem witch trials can swamp the individual lives involved, individuals still deserve to be remembered and, in remembering specific lives, modern readers can benefit from such historical intimacy. By examining the lives of six specific women, Marilynne Roach shows readers what it was like to be present throughout this horrific time and how it was impossible to live through it unchanged.
Release