Crude Democracy

Natural Resource Wealth and Political Regimes

Author: Thad Dunning

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521730754

Category: Political Science

Page: 350

View: 1775

This book challenges the conventional wisdom that natural resource wealth promotes autocracy. Oil and other forms of mineral wealth can promote both authoritarianism and democracy, the book argues, but they do so through different mechanisms; an understanding of these different mechanisms can help elucidate when either the authoritarian or democratic effects of resource wealth will be relatively strong. Exploiting game-theoretic tools and statistical modeling as well as detailed country case studies and drawing on fieldwork in Latin America and Africa, this book builds and tests a theory that explains political variation across resource-rich states. It will be read by scholars studying the political effects of natural resource wealth in many regions, as well as by those interested in the emergence and persistence of democratic regimes.
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Carbon Democracy

Political Power in the Age of Oil

Author: Timothy Mitchell

Publisher: Verso Books

ISBN: 1781681163

Category: Political Science

Page: 292

View: 7276

Carbon Democracy provides a unique examination of the relationship between oil and democracy. Interweaving the history of energy, political analysis, and economic theory, Mitchell targets conventional wisdom regarding energy and governance. Emphasizing how oil and democracy have intermixed, he argues that while coal provided the impetus for mass democracy, the shift to oil drastically limited democratic possibility; above all, the ability to confront contemporary ecological crises.
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Crude Domination

An Anthropology of Oil

Author: Andrea Behrends,Stephen Reyna,Günther Schlee

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 0857452568

Category: Social Science

Page: 334

View: 6630

Crude Domination is an innovative and important book about a critical topic – oil. While there have been numerous works about petroleum from 'experience-far' perspectives, there have been relatively few that have turned the 'experience-near' ethnographic gaze of anthropology on the topic. Crude Domination does just this among more peoples and more places than any other volume. Its chapters investigate nuances of culture, politics and economics in Africa, Latin America, and Eurasia as they pertain to petroleum. They wrestle with the key questions vexing scholars and practitioners alike: problems of the economic blight of the resource curse, underdevelopment, democracy, violence and war. Additionally they address topics that may initially appear insignificant – such as child witches and lionmen, fighting for oil when there is no oil, reindeer nomadism, community TV – but which turn out on closer scrutiny to be vital for explaining conflict and transformation in petro-states. Based upon these rich, new worlds of information, the text formulates a novel, domination approach to the social analysis of oil.
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Political Equality in Transnational Democracy

Author: E. Erman,S. Nasstrom

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137372249

Category: Political Science

Page: 190

View: 8452

This book is about the status of political equality under global political conditions. The overall aim is to revitalize the debate on the status of political equality in transnational democracy.
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Natural Experiments in the Social Sciences

A Design-Based Approach

Author: Thad Dunning

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107017661

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 358

View: 322

The first comprehensive guide to natural experiments, providing an ideal introduction for scholars and students.
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Clan Politics and Regime Transition in Central Asia

Author: Kathleen Collins

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 113946177X

Category: Political Science

Page: N.A

View: 1431

This book is a study of the role of clan networks in Central Asia from the early twentieth century through 2004. Exploring the social, economic, and historical roots of clans, and their political role and political transformation in the Soviet and post-Soviet periods, it argues that clans are informal political actors that are critical to understanding politics in this region. The book demonstrates that the Soviet system was far less successful in transforming and controlling Central Asian society, and in its policy of eradicating clan identities, than has often been assumed. In order to understand Central Asian politics and their economies, scholars and policy makers must take into account the powerful role of these informal groups, how they adapt and change over time, and how they may constrain or undermine democratization in this strategic region.
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Alberta Oil and the Decline of Democracy in Canada

Author: Meenal Shrivastava,Lorna Stefanick

Publisher: Athabasca University Press

ISBN: 1771990295

Category: Social Science

Page: 436

View: 1783

In Democracy in Alberta: The Theory and Practice of a Quasi-Party System, published in 1953, C. B. Macpherson explored the nature of democracy in a province that was dominated by a single class of producers. At the time, Macpherson was talking about Alberta farmers, but today the province can still be seen as a one-industry economy—the 1947 discovery of oil in Leduc having inaugurated a new era. For all practical purposes, the oil-rich jurisdiction of Alberta also remains a one-party state. Not only has there been little opposition to a government that has been in power for over forty years, but Alberta ranks behind other provinces in terms of voter turnout, while also boasting some of the lowest scores on a variety of social welfare indicators. The contributors to Alberta Oil and the Decline of Democracy critically assess the political peculiarities of Alberta and the impact of the government’s relationship to the oil industry on the lives of the province’s most vulnerable citizens. They also examine the public policy environment and the entrenchment of neoliberal political ideology in the province. In probing the relationship between oil dependency and democracy in the context of an industrialized nation, Alberta Oil and the Decline of Democracy offers a crucial test of the “oil inhibits democracy” thesis that has hitherto been advanced in relation to oil-producing countries in the Global South. If reliance on oil production appears to undermine democratic participation and governance in Alberta, then what does the Alberta case suggest for the future of democracy in industrialized nations such as the United States and Australia, which are now in the process of exploiting their own substantial shale oil reserves? The environmental consequences of oil production have, for example, been the subject of much attention. Little is likely to change, however, if citizens of oil-rich countries cannot effectively intervene to influence government policy.
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Crude Volatility

The History and the Future of Boom-Bust Oil Prices

Author: Robert McNally

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231543689

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 288

View: 4833

As OPEC has loosened its grip over the past ten years, the oil market has been rocked by wild price swings, the likes of which haven't been seen for eight decades. Crafting an engrossing journey from the gushing Pennsylvania oil fields of the 1860s to today's fraught and fractious Middle East, Crude Volatility explains how past periods of stability and volatility in oil prices help us understand the new boom-bust era. Oil's notorious volatility has always been considered a scourge afflicting not only the oil industry but also the broader economy and geopolitical landscape; Robert McNally makes sense of how oil became so central to our world and why it is subject to such extreme price fluctuations. Tracing a history marked by conflict, intrigue, and extreme uncertainty, McNally shows how—even from the oil industry's first years—wild and harmful price volatility prompted industry leaders and officials to undertake extraordinary efforts to stabilize oil prices by controlling production. Herculean market interventions—first, by Rockefeller's Standard Oil, then, by U.S. state regulators in partnership with major international oil companies, and, finally, by OPEC—succeeded to varying degrees in taming the beast. McNally, a veteran oil market and policy expert, explains the consequences of the ebbing of OPEC's power, debunking myths and offering recommendations—including mistakes to avoid—as we confront the unwelcome return of boom and bust oil prices.
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Crude World

Author: Peter Maass

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307273199

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 288

View: 9045

The catastrophic oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico has brought new attention to the huge costs of our oil dependence. In this stunning and revealing book, Peter Maass examines the social, political, and environmental impact of petroleum on the countries that produce it. Every unhappy oil-producing nation is unhappy in its own way, but all are touched by the “resource curse”—the power of oil to exacerbate existing problems and create new ones. Peter Maass presents a vivid portrait of the troubled world oil has created. From Saudi Arabia to Equatorial Guinea, from Venezuela to Iraq, the stories of rebels, royalty, middlemen, environmentalists, indigenous activists, and CEOs—all deftly and sensitively presented—come together in this startling and essential account of the consequences of our addiction to oil. From the Trade Paperback edition.
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The Death of Democracy

Hitler's Rise to Power and the Downfall of the Weimar Republic

Author: Benjamin Carter Hett

Publisher: Henry Holt and Company

ISBN: 1250162513

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 6208

A riveting account of how the Nazi Party came to power and how the failures of the Weimar Republic and the shortsightedness of German politicians allowed it to happen. Why did democracy fall apart so quickly and completely in Germany in the 1930s? How did a democratic government allow Adolf Hitler to seize power? In The Death of Democracy, Benjamin Carter Hett answers these questions, and the story he tells has disturbing resonances for our own time. To say that Hitler was elected is too simple. He would never have come to power if Germany’s leading politicians had not responded to a spate of populist insurgencies by trying to co-opt him, a strategy that backed them into a corner from which the only way out was to bring the Nazis in. Hett lays bare the misguided confidence of conservative politicians who believed that Hitler and his followers would willingly support them, not recognizing that their efforts to use the Nazis actually played into Hitler’s hands. They had willingly given him the tools to turn Germany into a vicious dictatorship. Benjamin Carter Hett is a leading scholar of twentieth-century Germany and a gifted storyteller whose portraits of these feckless politicians show how fragile democracy can be when those in power do not respect it. He offers a powerful lesson for today, when democracy once again finds itself embattled and the siren song of strongmen sounds ever louder.
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The Wicked Wine of Democracy

A Memoir of a Political Junkie, 1948-1995

Author: Joseph S. Miller

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 9780295802664

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 280

View: 4655

The Wicked Wine of Democracy is a frank account by a political operative and practicing lobbyist who in the early 1950s went from being a journalist in Seattle to working on the campaigns of such important political figures as Warren G. Magnuson, Henry �Scoop� Jackson, Frank Church, William Proxmire, and, finally, John F. Kennedy. He was so successful in managing the media for campaigns across the country that in 1957 the Washington Post labeled him �the Democrat's answer to Madison Avenue.� After Kennedy's victory, Miller opened a lobbying office on Capitol Hill and took on clients as diverse as the United Steelworkers of America, the Western Forest Industries Association, and the Marine Engineers Beneficial Association. In this always revealing and often humorous memoir, Miller reports on the highlights and backroom conversations from political campaigns, labor negotiations, and lobbying deals to give an honest picture of how politics worked over his forty-year career in the nation's Capitol.
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Crude Strategy

Rethinking the US Military Commitment to Defend Persian Gulf Oil

Author: Charles L. Glaser,Rosemary A. Kelanic

Publisher: Georgetown University Press

ISBN: 1626163359

Category: Political Science

Page: 312

View: 1551

Policymakers and scholars have long assumed the US must maintain a military presence in the Middle East to protect access to Persian Gulf oil. Charles L. Glaser and Rosemary A. Kelanic reconsider this policy based on analyses from a multidisciplinary team of political scientists, historians, and economists. The contributors explore topics that factor in critical changes taking place in oil markets, energy technology, and US defense budgets; potential economic costs of disruptions in oil supply; and possible policy options moving forward.
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Lifeblood

Oil, Freedom, and the Forces of Capital

Author: Matthew T. Huber

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 0816685967

Category: Nature

Page: 288

View: 4809

If our oil addiction is so bad for us, why don’t we kick the habit? Looking beyond the usual culprits—Big Oil, petro-states, and the strategists of empire—Lifeblood finds a deeper and more complex explanation in everyday practices of oil consumption in American culture. Those practices, Matthew T. Huber suggests, have in fact been instrumental in shaping the broader cultural politics of American capitalism. How did gasoline and countless other petroleum products become so central to our notions of the American way of life? Huber traces the answer from the 1930s through the oil shocks of the 1970s to our present predicament, revealing that oil’s role in defining popular culture extends far beyond material connections between oil, suburbia, and automobility. He shows how oil powered a cultural politics of entrepreneurial life—the very American idea that life itself is a product of individual entrepreneurial capacities. In so doing he uses oil to retell American political history from the triumph of New Deal liberalism to the rise of the New Right, from oil’s celebration as the lifeblood of postwar capitalism to increasing anxieties over oil addiction. Lifeblood rethinks debates surrounding energy and capitalism, neoliberalism and nature, and the importance of suburbanization in the rightward shift in American politics. Today, Huber tells us, as crises attributable to oil intensify, a populist clamoring for cheap energy has less to do with American excess than with the eroding conditions of life under neoliberalism.
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Go Back to Where You Came From

The Backlash Against Immigration and the Fate of Western Democracy

Author: Polakow-Suransky

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 1787380416

Category: Political Science

Page: N.A

View: 4862

From Europe to the United States and beyond, opportunistic politicians have exploited economic crisis, terrorist attacks and an influx of refugees to bring hateful and reactionary views from the margins of political discourse into the corridors of power. This climate has already helped propel Donald Trump to the White House, pushed Britain out of the European Union, and put Marine Le Pen within striking distance of the French presidency. Sasha Polakow-Suransky’s on-the-ground reportage and interviews with the rising stars of the new right tell the story of how we got here, tracing the global rise of anti-immigration politics and the ruthlessly effective rebranding of Europe’s new far right as defenders of Western liberal values. Go Back to Where You Came From is an indispensable account of why xenophobia went mainstream in countries known historically as defenders of human rights and models of tolerance.
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The End of Oil

On the Edge of a Perilous New World

Author: Paul Roberts

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 9780547525112

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 400

View: 8120

You live in this world. You use oil. You must read this book. The situation is alarming and irrefutable: within thirty years, even by conservative estimates, we will have burned our way through most of the oil that is readily available to us. Already, the costly side effects of dependence on fossil fuel are taking their toll. Even as oil-related conflict threatens entire nations, individual consumers are suffering from higher prices at the gas pump, rising health problems, and the grim prospect of long-term environmental damage. In this frank and balanced investigation, Paul Roberts offers a timely wake-up call. He talks to both oil optimists and oil pessimists, delves deep into the economics and politics of oil, and considers the promises and pitfalls of alternatives such as wind power, hybrid cars, and hydrogen. A new afterword brings the book up to the minute. Brisk, immediate, and accessible, this is essential reading for anyone who uses oil, which is to say every one of us.
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300 WEEKS

Mexico's Turbulent Transition to Democracy

Author: Carlos Luken

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 1469112558

Category: History

Page: 358

View: 9219

Writing about Mexico is seldom easy; the country’s dynamics make it almost impossible to isolate any bit of data without having it grow obsolete in a very short span of time. Sometimes its hard for a Mexican to understand our own cultural idiosyncrasies, it is complex for a person of a different nationality to do so. I began writing my weekly column in a very interesting time for Mexico. The country was passing thru the beginning stages of shedding its inadequate “Third World” status and struggling to evolve and become a modern State. It is very diffi cult for a person unfamiliar with Mexican History or Culture, to judge and at times avoid being prejudicial for the relative slowness of the process toward advance; in an effort to place my readers into a proper frame of mind, I have taken the liberty of borrowing a term not customarily used in political science, I often refer to Mexico’s progression as “Evolution”, this term implies perfectly the three key characteristics of the development process . . . Transformation, Survival and Time. After time some observers have come across another frequent and disconcerting feature . . . . Concurrency; the Mexican theater has many stages and each one has a different drama, author and actors. To make matters more complicated all plays are playing simultaneously in different acts. Explaining the Mexican drama to non-Mexicans is quite a challenge. Trying to translate words from one viewpoint to another only requires language skills (This can be easily accessed with any English-Spanish dictionary); but communicating concepts and ideas if they are to be understood, needs the foundation of what call I “Cultural Interface”. For understanding Mexico, “Cultural Interface” is an essential requirement; Mexican words or expressions although adequately translated seldom mean the same, political terminology never does. Being Mexican and having been raised in the Mexico-U.S. Border I acquired the vantage point of a Bi-cultural perspective. This quality made “Cultural Interface” easy and clear; but understanding is a two way street, it requires knowledge and comprehension by both sides; as a wise old uncle once told me “Manana is never Tomorrow, and next Monday never comes after Sunday” . . . . That’s it in a nutshell!. After years of writings on different topics regarding Mexico, I felt that there was enough material to summarize the political transcripts into an attempt to explain the weekly progressions and retreats that are transforming the Mexican political system into what we hope that in time, will be a modern Democracy. The title (300 WEEKS) does not refer to 300 weekly writings; to be frank I never counted the columns selected for this book. The term loosely refers to a Mexican political benchmark, “The Sexenio” (or “The six years”) which is the duration of a Mexican presidential term (The reader must remember that “No reelection” is one of Mexico’s sacred political commandments). Therefore “300 WEEKS” refers to a particular political era of transformation in which Mexico’s turbulent transition to democracy began and still continues.
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Brokers, Voters, and Clientelism

The Puzzle of Distributive Politics

Author: Susan C. Stokes,Thad Dunning,Marcelo Nazareno,Valeria Brusco

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107042208

Category: Political Science

Page: 316

View: 1350

Brokers, Voters, and Clientelism studies distributive politics: how parties and governments use material resources to win elections. The authors develop a theory that explains why loyal supporters, rather than swing voters, tend to benefit from pork-barrel politics; why poverty encourages clientelism and vote buying; and why redistribution and voter participation do not justify non-programmatic distribution.
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