Cowboys & cave dwellers

basketmaker archaeology in Utah's Grand Gulch

Author: Fred M. Blackburn,Ray A. Williamson

Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 188

View: 2629

The tortuous canyon country of southeastern Utah conceals thousands of archaeological sites, ancient homes of the ancestors of today's Southwest Indian peoples. Late in the 19th century, adventurous cowboy-archaeologists made the first forays into the canyons in search of the material remains of these prehistoric cultures, called "basketmaker". Rancher Richard Wetherill and numerous other adventurers, scholars, preachers, and businessmen mounted expeditions into the area now known as Grand Gulch. With varying degrees of scientific rigor, they mapped and dug the canyon's rich archaeological sites, removing large numbers of artifacts and burial goods to exhibit or sell back home. Almost 100 years after these explorers matte their way through the Gulch, a group of avocational archaeologists began to track the original explorers by tracing the signatures they had left on the canyon walls as they moved from site to site. This adventure grew into the Whetherill-Grand Gulch Project, an effort to recover the history and discover the current whereabouts of the many artifacts extracted from southeastern Utah's arid soil. In Cowboys and Cave Dwellers, Fred M. Blackburn and Ray A. Williamson tell the two intertwined stories of the early archaeological expeditions into Grand Gulch and the Wetherill-Grand Gulch Project. In the process, they describe what we now know about Basketmaker culture and present a stirring plea for the preservation of our nation's priceless archaeological heritage. Cowboys and Cave DwelLers is lavishly illustrated with color and black-and-white photographs, many of them by Bruce Hucko, author and photographer of Where There Is No Name for Art.
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Ancient Ruins and Rock Art of the Southwest

An Archaeological Guide

Author: David Grant Noble

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 1589799380

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 6610

This fourth edition of David Grant Noble's indispensable guide to archaeological ruins of the American Southwest includes updated text and many newly opened archaeological sites. From Alibates Flint Quarries in Texas to the Zuni-Acoma Trail in New Mexico, readers are provided with such favorites as Chaco Canyon and new treasures such as Sears Kay Ruin. In addition to descriptions of each site, Noble provides time-saving tips for the traveler, citing major highways, nearby towns and the facilities they offer, campgrounds, and other helpful information. Filled with photos of ruins, petroglyphs, and artifacts, as well as maps, this is a guide every traveler needs when exploring the Southwest.
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Southwestern Lore

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Archaeology

Page: N.A

View: 9355

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New Mexico Historical Review

Author: Lansing Bartlett Bloom,Paul A. F. Walter

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Indians of North America

Page: N.A

View: 7252

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Surveying the Record

North American Scientific Exploration to 1930

Author: Edward Carlos Carter

Publisher: American Philosophical Society

ISBN: 9780871692313

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 344

View: 646

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Colorado prehistory

a context for the Southern Colorado River Basin

Author: Crow Canyon Archaeological Center,Colorado Council of Professional Archaeologists

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 562

View: 7985

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Sandstone Spine

Seeking the Anasazi on the First Traverse of the Comb Ridge

Author: N.A

Publisher: The Mountaineers Books

ISBN: 9781594852381

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 240

View: 9246

* A cultural pilgrimage as well as an athletic one * Story blends personal adventure, middle-aged angst, the beauty of a landscape, history of exploration, and mysteries of the rise and fall of an ancient culture * By a critically acclaimed travel and adventure writer also famous for his exploits in Alaska's mountains * Includes photos by Greg Child of the landscape, Anasazi and Navajo ruins and rock art On September 1, 2004, three middle-aged buddies set out on one of the last geographic challenges never before attempted in North America: to hike the Comb Ridge in one continuous push. The Comb is an upthrust ridge of sandstone-virtually a mini-mountain range-that stretches almost unbroken for a hundred miles from just east of Kayenta, Arizona, to some ten miles west of Blanding, Utah. To hike the Comb is to run a gauntlet of up-and-down severities, with the precipice lurking on one hand, the fiendishly convoluted bedrock slab on the other-always at a sideways, ankle-wrenching pitch. There is not a single mile of established trail in the Comb's hundred-mile reach. The friends were David Roberts, writer, adventurer, famed mountaineer of decades past, at age 61 the graybeard of the bunch; Greg Child, renowned mountaineer and rock climber, age 47; and Vaughn Hadenfeldt, a wilderness guide intimately acquainted with the canyonlands, age 53. They came to the Comb not only for the physical challenge, but to seek out seldom-visited ruins and rock art of the mysterious Anasazi culture. Each brought his own emotions on the journey; the Comb Ridge would test their friendship in ways they had never before experienced. Searching for the stray arrowhead half-smothered in the sand or for the faint markings on a far sandstone boulder that betokened a little-known rock art panel, becomes a competitive sport for the three friends. Along the way, they ponder the mystery, bringing the accounts of early and modern explorers and archaeologists to bear: Who were the vanished Indians who built these inaccessible cliff dwellings and pueblos, often hidden from view? Of whom were they afraid and why? What caused them to suddenly abandon their settlements around 1300 AD? What meaning can be ascribed to their phantasmagoric rock art? What was their relationship to the Navajo, who were convinced the Anasazi had magical powers and could fly?
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Fire on the Plateau

Conflict And Endurance In The American Southwest

Author: Charles F. Wilkinson

Publisher: Island Press

ISBN: 9781610912457

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 416

View: 4352

"This book recounts my journey through the Colorado Plateau, a journey through place and time and self.... During my explorations of more than three decades, I found a land that sears into my heart and soul, a place that has taught me and changed me. I also discovered a land of conflict and endurance, a land that has given birth to one of the great chapters in American history." --from the Introduction The Colorado Plateau, stretching across four states and covering nearly 80 million acres, is one of the most unique and spectacular landscapes in the world. Remote, rugged, and dry -- at once forlorn and glorious -- it is a separate place, a place with its own distinctive landscape, history, and future.In Fire on the Plateau, legal scholar and writer Charles Wilkinson relates the powerful story of how, over the past thirty years, he has been drawn ever more deeply into the redrock country and Indian societies of the Colorado Plateau. His work in the early 1970s as staff attorney for the newly formed Native American Rights Fund brought him into close contact with Navajo and Hopi people. His growing friendships with American Indians and increasing understanding of their cultures, along with his longstanding scholarship and experiences on federal public lands, led him to delve into the complicated history of the region.Wilkinson examines that history -- the sometimes violent conflicts between indigenous populations and more recent settlers, the political machinations by industry and the legal establishment, the contentious disputes over resources and land use -- and provides a compelling look at the epic events that have shaped the region. From centuries of habitation by native peoples to Mormon settlement, from the "Big Build-Up" of the post-World War II era to the increased environmental awareness of recent years, he explores the conquests of tribes and lands that have taken place, and the ways in which both have endured.Throughout, Wilkinson uses his own personal experiences as a lawyer working with Indian people and his heartfelt insights about a land that he grew to love to tie together the threads of the story. Fire on the Plateau is a vital and dynamic work that is sure to strike a chord with anyone interested in the past or future of the American Southwest.
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Comb Ridge and its people

the ethnohistory of a rock

Author: Robert S. McPherson

Publisher: Utah State University Press

ISBN: 9780874217377

Category: History

Page: 252

View: 907

West of the Four Corners and east of the Colorado River, in southeastern Utah, a unique one-hundred-mile-long, two-hundred-foot-high, serrated cliff cuts the sky. Whether viewed as barrier wall or sheltering sanctuary, Comb Ridge has helped define life and culture in this region for thousands of years. Today, the area it crosses is still relatively remote, though an important part of a scenic complex of popular tourist destinations that includes Natural Bridges National Monument and Grand Gulch just to the west, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and Lake Powell a bit farther west, Canyonlands National Park to the north, Hovenweep National Monument to the east, and the San Juan River and Monument Valley to the south. Prehistorically Comb Ridge split an intensively used Ancient Puebloan homeland. It later had similar cultural—both spiritual and practical—significance to Utes, Paiutes, and Navajos and played a crucial role in the history of European American settlement. To tell the story of this rock that is unlike any other rock in the world and the diverse people whose lives it has affected, Robert S. McPherson, author of multiple books on Navajos and on the Four Corners region, draws on the findings of a major, federally funded project to research the cultural history of Comb Ridge. He carries the story forward to contention over present and future uses of Comb Ridge and the spectacular country surrounding it.
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Richard Wetherill

Anasazi

Author: Frank McNitt

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN: 9780826303295

Category: Social Science

Page: 370

View: 5974

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The Wetherills of the Mesa Verde

Autobiography of Benjamin Alfred Wetherill

Author: Benjamin Alfred Wetherill

Publisher: Associated University Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 333

View: 3573

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Marietta Wetherill

Life with the Navajos in Chaco Canyon

Author: Marietta Wetherill

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN: 9780826318206

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 241

View: 4539

First published in 1992 and now available only from the University of New Mexico Press, this is a firsthand account of life at a famous archaeological ruin. Married to Richard Wetherill, the rancher and amateur archaeologist who ran a trading post in Chaco Canyon from 1896 until he was murdered by a Navajo in 1910, Marietta Wetherill got to know her Navajo neighbors as intimately as an Anglo could. While Richard was excavating at Pueblo Bonito, Marietta managed the trading post. She befriended a singer who adopted her into his clan and gave her a close-up view of Navajo medicine and religion.
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Comb Ridge and its people

the ethnohistory of a rock

Author: Robert S. McPherson

Publisher: Utah State University Press

ISBN: 9780874217377

Category: History

Page: 252

View: 5797

West of the Four Corners and east of the Colorado River, in southeastern Utah, a unique one-hundred-mile-long, two-hundred-foot-high, serrated cliff cuts the sky. Whether viewed as barrier wall or sheltering sanctuary, Comb Ridge has helped define life and culture in this region for thousands of years. Today, the area it crosses is still relatively remote, though an important part of a scenic complex of popular tourist destinations that includes Natural Bridges National Monument and Grand Gulch just to the west, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and Lake Powell a bit farther west, Canyonlands National Park to the north, Hovenweep National Monument to the east, and the San Juan River and Monument Valley to the south. Prehistorically Comb Ridge split an intensively used Ancient Puebloan homeland. It later had similar cultural—both spiritual and practical—significance to Utes, Paiutes, and Navajos and played a crucial role in the history of European American settlement. To tell the story of this rock that is unlike any other rock in the world and the diverse people whose lives it has affected, Robert S. McPherson, author of multiple books on Navajos and on the Four Corners region, draws on the findings of a major, federally funded project to research the cultural history of Comb Ridge. He carries the story forward to contention over present and future uses of Comb Ridge and the spectacular country surrounding it.
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Southwest Archaeology in the Twentieth Century

Author: Linda S Cordell,Don D Fowler

Publisher: University of Utah Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 312

View: 6602

Mesa Verde, Chaco Canyon, Canyon de Chelly, and Paquimé are as well known to tourists as they are to scholars as emblems of the American Southwest. This region has been the scene of intense archaeological investigation for more than a hundred years, with more research done here than in any other part of the United States. The arid and sparsely populated landscape provides excellent site preservation, while the living native peoples give cultural continuity with the past. In the first decades of the twentieth century Americans saw the Southwest as exotic—as opposed to the Mexican perspective, which viewed the region, sometimes called the Northwest, as more of a backwater. Both views continue to shape and color the study of the area today. With contributions from well-known archaeologists, Southwest Archaeology in the Twentieth Century reviews the histories of major archaeological topics of the region during the twentieth century, with particular attention to the vast changes in southwestern archaeology during the later decades of the century. Included are the huge influence of field schools, the rise of cultural resource management (CRM), the uses and abuses of ethnographic analogy, the intellectual contexts of archaeology in Mexico, and current debates on agriculture, sedentism, and political complexity. By looking back at the previous century of study, this book provides an authoritative retrospective of intellectual trends as well as a synthesis of current themes in the arena of the American Southwest.
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Man Corn

Cannibalism and Violence in the Prehistoric American Southwest

Author: Christy G. Turner,Jacqueline A. Turner

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 547

View: 2000

This study of prehistoric violence, homicide, and cannibalism explodes the myth that the Anasazi and other Southwest Indians were simple, peaceful farmers. Until quite recently, Southwest prehistory studies have largely missed or ignored evidence of violent competition. Christy and Jacqueline Turner's study of prehistoric violence, homicide, and cannibalism explodes the myth that the Anasazi and other Southwest Indians were simple, peaceful farmers. Using detailed osteological analyses and other lines of evidence the Turners show that warfare, violence, and their concomitant horrors were as common in the ancient Southwest as anywhere else in the world. The special feature of this massively documented study is its multi-regional assessment of episodic human bones assemblages (scattered floor deposits or charnel pits) by taphonomic analysis, which considers what happens to bones from the time of death to the time of recovery. During the past thirty years, the authors and other analysts have identified a minimal perimortem taphonomic signature of burning, pot polishing, anvil abrasions, bone breakage, cut marks, and missing vertebrae that closely match the signatures of animal butchering and is frequently associated with additional evidence of violence. More than seventy-five archaeological sited containing several hundred individuals are carefully examined for the cannibalism signature. Because this signature has not been reported for any sites north of Mexico, other than those in the Southwest, the authors also present detailed comparisons with Mesoamerican skeletal collections where human sacrifice and cannibalism were known to have been practiced. The authors review several hypotheses for Southwest cannibalism: starvation, social pathology, and institutionalized violence and cannibalism. In the latter case, they present evidence for a potential Mexican connection and demonstrate that most of the known cannibalized series are located temporally and spatially near Chaco great houses.
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Rainbow Bridge

An Illustrated History

Author: Hank Hassell

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 173

View: 7832

The remote, hard-to-reach national monument was supposed to define a limit to Colorado River reclamation but instead was inundated by Lake Powell and the tide of visitors who then could reach the foot of the bridge by boat. Though it is now easily and frequently visited and National Park Service amenities are in place, access to Rainbow Bridge is still an evolving and controversial issue."--Jacket.
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Glen Canyon dammed

inventing Lake Powell and the Canyon Country

Author: Jared Farmer

Publisher: Univ of Arizona Pr

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 269

View: 9288

Growth is a major issue in the contemporary American West, especially as more and more towns and states turn to tourism to spark their economies. But growth has a flip side—loss—about which we seldom think until something is irrevocably gone. Where once was Glen Canyon, with its maze of side-canyons leading to the Colorado River, now is Lake Powell, second largest reservoir in America, attracting some three million visitors a year. Many who come here think they have found paradise, and for good reason: it's beautiful. However, the loss of Glen Canyon was monumental—to many, a notorious event that remains unresolved. Focusing on the saddening, maddening example of Glen Canyon, Jared Farmer traces the history of exploration and development in the Four Corners region, discusses the role of tourism in changing the face of the West, and shows how the "invention" of Lake Powell has served multiple needs. He also seeks to identify the point at which change becomes loss: How do people deal with losing places they love? How are we to remember or restore lost places? By presenting Glen Canyon as a historical case study in exploitation, Farmer offers a cautionary tale for the future of this spectacular region. In assessing the necessity and impact of tourism, he questions whether merely visiting such places is really good for people's relationships with each other and with the land, suggesting a new ethic whereby westerners learn to value what remains of their environment. Glen Canyon Dammed was written so that the canyon country's perennial visitors might better understand the history of the region, its legacy of change, and their complicity in both. A sobering book that recalls lost beauty, it also speaks eloquently for the beauty that may still be saved.
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The Wetherills

Friends of Mesa Verde

Author: Fred M. Blackburn

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 675

Following in the wake of what one noted scientist called 'transients who neither revered nor cared for the ruins as symbols of the past, ' the Wetherill family became the earliest students of Mesa Verde. Their careful excavations and record-keeping helped preserve key information, leading to a deeper understanding of the people who built and occupied the cliff dwellings. As devout Quakers, they felt they were predestined to protect the historic sites from wanton destruction - a role that would not be assumed by the government or other institutions until years later. Based on decades of meticulous research, author Fred Blackburn sets the record straight on these early protectors of Mesa Verde.
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