Conceptualism of Science and Journalism

Author: Felix Ale

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 3656945772

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 13

View: 2696

Essay from the year 2015 in the subject Communications - Journalism, Journalism Professions, grade: A, Atlantic International University, course: PhD JOURNALISM, language: English, abstract: The critical and analytical view on theories that are founded based on Science and Journalism are referred to as the Conceptualism process. Technology in the current world has proven a variety of concepts that can be used in various fields such as journalism and science. This paper will critically analyze the concepts of science and journalism, relationship, contributions to the society. It will evaluate on the communication theory by Arthur C. Clark, Effects of the theory on science and media practice. The study will take a critical look at how science and journalism serves as catalysts for globalization or technological revolution. It will finally discuss future prospects of journalism and science as well as the way forward for better collaboration for the good of the society.
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Merchants of Doubt

How a Handful of Scientists Obscured the Truth on Issues from Tobacco Smoke to Global Warming

Author: Naomi Oreskes,Erik M. Conway

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1608193942

Category: Science

Page: 355

View: 5906

"Anyone concerned about the state of democracy in America should read this book."-Al Gore
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Sellars and the History of Modern Philosophy

Author: Luca Corti,Antonio M. Nunziante

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351659863

Category: Philosophy

Page: 286

View: 1436

This edited volume systematically addresses the connection between Wilfrid Sellars and the history of modern philosophy, exploring both the content and method of this relationship. It intends both to analyze Sellars’ position in relation to singular thinkers of the modern tradition, and to inquire into Sellars’ understanding of philosophy as a field in reflective and constructive conversation with its past. The chapters in Part I cover Sellars’ interpretation and use of Descartes, Leibniz, Hume, Kant, and Hegel. Part II features essays on his relationship with Peirce, Frege, Carnap, Wittgenstein, American pragmatism, behaviorism, and American realism, particularly his father, Roy Wood. Sellars and the History of Modern Philosophy features original contributions by many of the most renowned Sellars scholars throughout the world. It offers an exhaustive survey of Sellars’ views on the historical antecedents and meta-philosophical aspects of his thought.
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Science and Environmental Journalism

Author: Felix Ale

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN: 3656874484

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 10

View: 8642

Essay from the year 2014 in the subject Communications - Journalism, Journalism Professions, Atlantic International University, language: English, abstract: Environmental changes have been marked with climate change and global warming.Scientists have intensified research to deepen understanding with regard to environmental issues.However,their findings would be useless if they are not disseminated to the public.Nevertheless,the field of environmental journalism was developed in the 20th century to bring information to the public.Clearly,science and the field of environmental journalism have contributed to the society,the public and the policy making process in different ways.This essay explores the contribution of science and environmental science in relation to social and human development.
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The Family That Couldn't Sleep

A Medical Mystery

Author: D. T. Max

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1588365581

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 336

View: 6537

For two hundred years a noble Venetian family has suffered from an inherited disease that strikes their members in middle age, stealing their sleep, eating holes in their brains, and ending their lives in a matter of months. In Papua New Guinea, a primitive tribe is nearly obliterated by a sickness whose chief symptom is uncontrollable laughter. Across Europe, millions of sheep rub their fleeces raw before collapsing. In England, cows attack their owners in the milking parlors, while in the American West, thousands of deer starve to death in fields full of grass. What these strange conditions–including fatal familial insomnia, kuru, scrapie, and mad cow disease–share is their cause: prions. Prions are ordinary proteins that sometimes go wrong, resulting in neurological illnesses that are always fatal. Even more mysterious and frightening, prions are almost impossible to destroy because they are not alive and have no DNA–and the diseases they bring are now spreading around the world. In The Family That Couldn’t Sleep, essayist and journalist D. T. Max tells the spellbinding story of the prion’s hidden past and deadly future. Through exclusive interviews and original archival research, Max explains this story’s connection to human greed and ambition–from the Prussian chemist Justus von Liebig, who made cattle meatier by feeding them the flesh of other cows, to New Guinean natives whose custom of eating the brains of the dead nearly wiped them out. The biologists who have investigated these afflictions are just as extraordinary–for example, Daniel Carleton Gajdusek, a self-described “pedagogic pedophiliac pediatrician” who cracked kuru and won the Nobel Prize, and another Nobel winner, Stanley Prusiner, a driven, feared self-promoter who identified the key protein that revolutionized prion study. With remarkable precision, grace, and sympathy, Max–who himself suffers from an inherited neurological illness–explores maladies that have tormented humanity for centuries and gives reason to hope that someday cures will be found. And he eloquently demonstrates that in our relationship to nature and these ailments, we have been our own worst enemy.
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The Persistence of Taste

Art, Museums and Everyday Life After Bourdieu

Author: Malcolm Quinn,Dave Beech,Michael Lehnert,Carol Tulloch,Stephen Wilson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317207513

Category: Social Science

Page: 386

View: 3119

This book offers an interdisciplinary analysis of the social practice of taste in the wake of Pierre Bourdieu’s sociology of taste. For the first time, this book unites sociologists and other social scientists with artists and curators, art theorists and art educators, and art, design and cultural historians who engage with the practice of taste as it relates to encounters with art, cultural institutions and the practices of everyday life, in national and transnational contexts. The volume is divided into four sections. The first section on ‘Taste and art’, shows how art practice was drawn into the sphere of ‘good taste’, contrasting this with a post-conceptualist critique that offers a challenge to the social functions of good taste through an encounter with art. The next section on ‘Taste making and the museum’ examines the challenges and changing social, political and organisational dynamics propelling museums beyond the terms of a supposedly universal institution and language of taste. The third section of the book, ‘Taste after Bourdieu in Japan’ offers a case study of the challenges to the cross-cultural transmission and local reproduction of ‘good taste’, exemplified by the complex cultural context of Japan. The final section on ‘Taste, the home and everyday life’ juxtaposes the analysis of the reproduction of inequality and alienation through taste, with arguments on how the legacy of ideas of ‘good taste’ have extended the possibilities of experience and sharpened our consciousness of identity. As the first book to bring together arts practitioners and theorists with sociologists and other social scientists to examine the legacy and continuing validity of Pierre Bourdieu’s sociology of taste, this publication engages with the opportunities and problems involved in understanding the social value and the cultural dispositions of taste ‘after Bourdieu’. It does so at a moment when the practice of taste is being radically changed by the global expansion of cultural choices, and the emergence of deploying impersonal algorithms as solutions to cultural and creative decision-making.
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Bourdieu and the Sociology of Music Education

Author: Pamela Burnard,Ylva Hofvander Trulsson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317172906

Category: Music

Page: 254

View: 2305

Pierre Bourdieu has been an extraordinarily influential figure in the sociology of music. For over four decades, his concepts have helped to generate both empirical and theoretical interventions in the field of musical study. His impact on the sociology of music taste, in particular, has been profound, his ideas directly informing our understandings of how musical preferences reflect and reproduce inequalities between social classes, ethnic groups, and men and women. Bourdieu and the Sociology of Music Education draws together a group of international researchers, academics and artist-practitioners who offer a critical introduction and exploration of Pierre Bourdieu’s rich generative conceptual tools for advancing sociological views of music education. By employing perspectives from Bourdieu’s work on distinction and judgement and his conceptualisation of fields, habitus and capitals in relation to music education, contributing authors explore the ways in which Bourdieu’s work can be applied to music education as a means of linking school (institutional habitus) and learning, and curriculum and family (class habitus). The volume includes research perspectives and studies of how Bourdieu’s tools have been applied in industry and educational contexts, including the primary, secondary and higher music education sectors. The volume begins with an introduction to Bourdieu’s contribution to theory and methodology and then goes on to deal in detail with illustrative substantive studies. The concluding chapter is an extended essay that reflects on, and critiques, the application of Bourdieu’s work and examines the ways in which the studies contained in the volume advance understanding. The book contributes new perspectives to our understanding of Bourdieu’s tools across diverse settings and practices of music education.
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Human Cloning in the Media

Author: Joan Haran,Jenny Kitzinger,Researcher in Sociology of Media Jenny Kitzinger,Maureen McNeil,Kate O'Riordan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134101198

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 6633

This book provides an intensive exploration of recent popular representations of human cloning, genetics and the concerns which they generate and mobilise. It is a timely contribution to current debates about the public communication of science and about the cultural and political stakes in those debates. Taking the UK as its main case study, with cross-cultural comparisons with the USA and South Korea, the book explores the proposition that genomics is ‘the publicly mediated science par excellence’, through detailed reference to the rhetoric and images around human reproductive and therapeutic cloning which have proliferated in the wake of the ‘completion’ of the Human Genome Project (2000). The book offers a set of distinctive analyses of media and cultural texts – including press and television news, Hollywood and independent film drama, documentaries, art exhibits and websites – and in dialogue with the producers and consumers of these texts. From these investigations, key issues are foregrounded: the image of the scientist, scientific expertise and institutions; the governance of science; the representation of women’s bodies as the subjects and objects of biotechnology; and the constitution of publics, both as objects of media debate, and as their intended audience. This examination demonstrates the importance of mediation, media institutions, and media texts in the production of scientific knowledge. Countering models that see ‘the media’ as simply a channel through which scientific knowledge passes, this book will emphasise the importance of communications technologies in the production of modern scientific knowledge and their particular significance in contemporary genomics. It will argue that human genomic science – and cloning as its current iconic manifestation – has to be understood as a complex cultural production.
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Reading Uncreative Writing

Conceptualism, Expression, and the Lyric

Author: David Kaufmann

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319622927

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 169

View: 7031

This book examines Uncreative Writing—the catch-all term to describe Neo-Conceptualism, Flarf and related avant-garde movements in contemporary North American poetry—against a decade of controversy. David Kaufman analyzes texts by Kenneth Goldsmith, Vanessa Place, Robert Fitterman, Ara Shirinyan, Craig Dworkin, Dan Farrell and Katie Degentesh to demonstrate that Uncreative Writing is not a revolutionary break from lyric tradition as its proponents claim. Nor is it a racist, reactionary capitulation to neo-liberalism as its detractors argue. Rather, this monograph shows that Uncreative Writing’s real innovations and weaknesses become clearest when read in the context of the very lyric that it claims to have left behind.
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Birth of a Nation

The Story of a Newspaper in Kenya

Author: Gerard Loughran

Publisher: I.B.Tauris

ISBN: 0857710907

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 344

View: 3993

Launched in Nairobi in 1960, three years before the birth of independent Kenya, the Nation group of newspapers grew up sharing the struggles of an infant nation, suffering the pain of its failures and rejoicing in its successes. Marking its 50th anniversary in 2010, the Nation looks back on its performance as the standard-bearer for journalistic integrity and how far it fell short or supported the loyalty demanded by its founding slogan 'The Truth shall make you free'. The Aga Khan was still a student at Harvard University when he decided that an honest and independent newspaper would be a crucial contribution to East Africa's peaceful transition to democracy. The 'Sunday Nation' and 'Daily Nation' were launched in 1960 when independence for Kenya was not far over the horizon. They quickly established a reputation for honesty and fair-mindedness, while shocking the colonial and settler establishment by calling for the release of the man who could become the nation's first prime minister, Jomo Kenyatta, and early negotiations for 'Uhuru'. By the time of independence, the Nation newspapers were already established at the heart of a literate African leadership, and their importance, both editorial and commercial, would continue to grow. In the decades following independence, the government's attempts to harness the media's communicative power and reach would be at odds with the editors' determination to toe an independent line. Despite the arrests, intimidation and economic pressures suffered by the Nation newspapers, they remained resolutely patriotic, most recently seeking to act as peace brokers in the violence that broke out following the 2007 election. The history of the 'Nation' papers and that of Kenya are closely intertwined; in the heat of its printing presses and philosophical struggles, that story is told here: from committed beginnings to its position today as East Africa's leading newspaper group.
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New Tendencies

Art at the Threshold of the Information Revolution (1961 - 1978)

Author: Armin Medosch

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262331926

Category: Art

Page: 408

View: 1575

New Tendencies, a nonaligned modernist art movement, emerged in the early 1960s in the former Yugoslavia, a nonaligned country. It represented a new sensibility, rejecting both Abstract Expressionism and socialist realism in an attempt to formulate an art adequate to the age of advanced mass production. In this book, Armin Medosch examines the development of New Tendencies as a major international art movement in the context of social, political, and technological history. Doing so, he traces concurrent paradigm shifts: the change from Fordism (the political economy of mass production and consumption) to the information society, and the change from postwar modernism to dematerialized postmodern art practices. Medosch explains that New Tendencies, rather than opposing the forces of technology as most artists and intellectuals of the time did, imagined the rapid advance of technology to be a springboard into a future beyond alienation and oppression. Works by New Tendencies cast the viewer as coproducer, abolishing the idea of artist as creative genius and replacing it with the notion of the visual researcher. In 1968 and 1969, the group actively turned to the computer as a medium of visual research, anticipating new media and digital art.Medosch discusses modernization in then-Yugoslavia and other nations on the periphery; looks in detail at New Tendencies' five major exhibitions in Zagreb (the capital of Croatia); and considers such topics as the group's relation to science, the changing relationship of manual and intellectual labor, New Tendencies in the international art market, their engagement with computer art, and the group's eventual eclipse by other "new art practices" including conceptualism, land art, and arte povera. Numerous illustrations document New Tendencies' works and exhibitions.
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Am I Making Myself Clear?

Author: Cornelia Dean

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674053710

Category: Science

Page: 288

View: 7131

Am I Making Myself Clear? shows scientists how to speak to the public, handle the media, and describe their work to a lay audience on paper, online, and over the airwaves. It is a book that will improve the tone and content of debate over critical issues and will serve the interests of science and society.
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The Science Writers' Handbook

Everything You Need to Know to Pitch, Publish, and Prosper in the Digital Age

Author: SciLance (Firm)

Publisher: Da Capo Press

ISBN: 0738216569

Category: Reference

Page: 308

View: 9839

"Popular science writing has exploded in the past decade, both in print and on-line. Who better to guide writers striving to succeed in the profession than a group of award-winning, well-published journalists with a combined 225 years of experience? FromThomas Hayden's chapter on the nuts and bolts of making the perfect pitch to Emma Maris's advice about putting together a book proposal to Mark Schrope's essential information on contracts, the members of SciLance give writers of all levels the practicalinformation they need to succeed, either as a staffer or as a freelancer. Going beyond craft, The Science Writer's Handbook also tackles lifestyle issues such as office space, steady income, and financial and emotional resources, for the ultimate guide to the craft, business and life of science writing"--
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The Social Psychology of Communication

Author: D. Hook,B. Franks,M. Bauer

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230297617

Category: Psychology

Page: 371

View: 5864

This is the first comprehensive text on social psychological approaches to communication, providing an excellent introduction to theoretical perspectives, special topics, and applied areas and practice in communication. Bringing together scholars of international reputation, this book provides a unique contribution to the field.
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Artists' Magazines

An Alternative Space for Art

Author: Gwen Allen

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262015196

Category: Art

Page: 368

View: 8019

During the 1960s and 1970s, magazines became an important new site of artistic practice, functioning as an alternative exhibition space for the dematerialized practices of conceptual art. Allen looks at the most important of these magazines in their heyday and compiles an illustrated directory of hundreds of others.
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A Field Guide for Science Writers

The Official Guide of the National Association of Science Writers

Author: Deborah Blum,Mary Knudson,Robin Marantz Henig

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198039020

Category: Science

Page: 336

View: 4212

This is the official text for the National Association of Science Writers. In the eight years since the publication of the first edition of A Field Guide for Science Writing, much about the world has changed. Some of the leading issues in today's political marketplace - embryonic stem cell research, global warming, health care reform, space exploration, genetic privacy, germ warfare - are informed by scientific ideas. Never has it been more crucial for the lay public to be scientifically literate. That's where science writers come in. And that's why it's time for an update to the Field Guide, already a staple of science writing graduate programs across the country. The academic community has recently recognized how important it is for writers to become more sophisticated, knowledgeable, and skeptical about what they write. More than 50 institutions now offer training in science writing. In addition mid-career fellowships for science writers are growing, giving journalists the chance to return to major universities for specialized training. We applaud these developments, and hope to be part of them with this new edition of the Field Guide. In A Field Guide for Science Writers, 2nd Edition, the editors have assembled contributions from a collections of experienced journalists who are every bit as stellar as the group that contributed to the first edition. In the end, what we have are essays written by the very best in the science writing profession. These wonderful writers have written not only about style, but about content, too. These leaders in the profession describe how they work their way through the information glut to find the gems worth writing about. We also have chapters that provide the tools every good science writer needs: how to use statistics, how to weigh the merits of conflicting studies in scientific literature, how to report about risk. And, ultimately, how to write.
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Expanded Painting

Ontological Aesthetics and the Essence of Colour

Author: Mark Titmarsh

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1350004162

Category: Philosophy

Page: 240

View: 8146

The relevance of painting has been questioned many times over the last century, by the arrival of photography, installation art and digital technologies. But rather than accept the death of painting, Mark Titmarsh traces a paradoxical interface between this art form and its opposing forces to define a new practice known as 'expanded painting' giving the term historical context, theoretical structure and an important place in contemporary practice. As the formal boundaries tumble, the being of painting expands to become a kind of total art incorporating all other media including sculpture, video and performance. Painting is considered from three different perspectives: ethnology, art theory and ontology. From an ethnological point of view, painting is one of any number of activities that takes place within a culture. In art theory terms, painting is understood to produce objects of interest for humanities disciplines. Yet painting as a medium often challenges both its object and image status, 'expanding' and creating hybrid works between painting, objects, screen media and text. Ontologically, painting is understood as an object of aesthetic discourse that in turn reflects historical states of being. Thus, Expanded Painting delivers a new kind of saying, a post-aesthetic discourse that is attuned to an uncanny tension between the presence and absence of painting.
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Exploring Transdisciplinarity in Art and Sciences

Author: Zoï Kapoula,Emmanuelle Volle,Juleien Renoult,Moreno Andreatta

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319760548

Category: Philosophy

Page: N.A

View: 9666

This book is organized around 4 sections. The first deals with the creativity and its neural basis (responsible editor Emmanuelle Volle). The second section concerns the neurophysiology of aesthetics (responsible editor Zoï Kapoula). It covers a large spectrum of different experimental approaches going from architecture, to process of architectural creation and issues of architectural impact on the gesture of the observer. Neurophysiological aspects such as space navigation, gesture, body posture control are involved in the experiments described as well as questions about terminology and valid methodology. The next chapter contains studies on music, mathematics and brain (responsible editor Moreno Andreatta). The final section deals with evolutionary aesthetics (responsible editor Julien Renoult).
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Science Blogging

The Essential Guide

Author: Christie Wilcox

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300197551

Category: Computers

Page: 288

View: 5136

Here is the essential how-to guide for communicating scientific research and discoveries online, ideal for journalists, researchers, and public information officers looking to reach a wide lay audience. Drawing on the cumulative experience of twenty-seven of the greatest minds in scientific communication, this invaluable handbook targets the specific questions and concerns of the scientific community, offering help in a wide range of digital areas, including blogging, creating podcasts, tweeting, and more. With step-by-step guidance and one-stop expertise, this is the book every scientist, science writer, and practitioner needs to approach the Wild West of the Web with knowledge and confidence.
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