Civilities and Civil Rights

Greensboro, North Carolina, and the Black Struggle for Freedom

Author: William Henry Chafe

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780195029192

Category: History

Page: 282

View: 7394

Reveals how whites in Greensboro used the traditional Southern concept of civility as a means of keeping Black protest in check and how Black activists continually devised new ways of asserting their quest for freedom.
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Civilities and Civil Rights

Greensboro, North Carolina, and the Black Struggle for Freedom

Author: William Henry Chafe

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: N.A

Category: Law

Page: 436

View: 9469

Reveals how whites in Greensboro used the traditional Southern concept of civility as a means of keeping Black protest in check and how Black activists continually devised new ways of asserting their quest for freedom
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Like a Holy Crusade

Mississippi, 1964 - The Turning of the Civil Rights Movement in America

Author: Nicolaus Mills

Publisher: Ivan R Dee

ISBN: 9781566630269

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 222

View: 7462

Provides an account of the Mississippi Summer Project of 1964 and the turning of the civil rights movement in America. This book recalls the triumphs of the episode and shows how the quest for racial solidarity turned divisive and laid the foundations for the black power movement.
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Many Excellent People

Power and Privilege in North Carolina, 1850-1900

Author: Paul D. Escott

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469610965

Category: History

Page: 366

View: 2335

Many Excellent People examines the nature of North Carolina's social system, particularly race and class relations, power, and inequality, during the last half of the nineteenth century. Paul Escott portrays North Carolina's major social groups, focusing on the elite, the ordinary white farmers or workers, and the blacks, and analyzes their attitudes, social structure, and power relationships. Quoting frequently from a remarkable array of letters, journals, diaries, and other primary sources, he shows vividly the impact of the Civil War, Emancipation, Reconstruction, Populism, and the rise of the New South industrialism on southern society. Working within the new social history and using detailed analyses of five representative counties, wartime violence, Ku Klux Klan membership, stock-law legislation, and textile mill records, Escott reaches telling conclusions on the interplay of race, class, and politics. Despite fundamental political and economic reforms, Escott argues, North Carolina's social system remained as hierarchical and undemocratic in 1900 as it had been in 1850.
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Black Nationalism in American Politics and Thought

Author: Dean E. Robinson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521626279

Category: Political Science

Page: 171

View: 4552

Revisits the arguments supporting separate black statehood from the mid-nineteenth century to the present.
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The Paradox of Change

American Women in the 20th Century

Author: William H. Chafe,William Henry Chafe

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780195044195

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 6980

When William Chafe's The American Woman was published in 1972, it was hailed as a breakthrough in the study of women in this century. Bella Abzug praised it as "a remarkable job of historical research," and Alice Kessler-Harris called it "an extraordinarily useful synthesis of material about 20th-century women." But much has happened in the last two decades--both in terms of scholarship, and in the lives of American women. With The Paradox of Change, Chafe builds on his classic work, taking full account of the events and scholarship of the last fifteen years, as he extends his analysis into the 1990s with the rise of feminism and the New Right. Chafe conveys all the subtleties of women's paradoxical position in the United States today, showing how women have gradually entered more fully into economic and political life, but without attaining complete social equality or economic justice. Despite the gains achieved by feminist activists during the 1970s and 1980s, the tensions continued to abound between public and private roles, and the gap separating ideals of equal opportunity from the reality of economic discrimination widened. Women may have gained some new rights in the last two decades, but the feminization of poverty has also soared, with women constituting 70% of the adult poor. Moreover, a resurgence of conservatism, symbolized by the triumph of Phyllis Schlafly's anti-ERA coalition, has cast in doubt even some of the new rights of women, such as reproductive freedom. Chafe captures these complexities and contradictions with a lively combination of representative anecdotes and archival research, all backed up by statistical studies. As in The American Woman, Chafe once again examines "woman's place" throughout the 20th century, but now with a more nuanced and inclusive approach. There are insightful portraits of the continuities of women's political activism from the Progressive era through the New Deal; of the contradictory gains and losses of the World War II years; and of the various kinds of feminism that emerged out of the tumult of the 1960s. Not least, there are narratives of all the significant struggles in which women have engaged during these last ninety years--for child care, for abortion rights, and for a chance to have both a family and a career. The Paradox of Change is a wide-ranging history of 20th-century women, thoroughly researched and incisively argued. Anyone who wants to learn more about how women have shaped, and been shaped by, modern America will have to read this book.
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Bayard Rustin and the Civil Rights Movement

Author: Daniel Levine

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813527185

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 307

View: 919

The New Negro Artist in Paris analyzes the experiences and works of six African American artists who lived and worked in Paris during the Jazz Age sculptors Elizabeth Prophet and Augusta Savage, and painters Palmer Hayden, Hale Woodruff, Archibald J. Motley, Jr., and Albert Alexander Smith. More than 120 works of art are analyzed, many never before published. These artists exhibited the works they created in Paris at prestigious salons in France and in the United States, winning fellowships, grants, and awards. Leininger-Miller argues that it was study abroad that won these artists critical acclaim, establishing their reputations as some of the most significant leaders of the New Negro movement in the visual arts. She begins her study with a history of the debut of African American artists in Paris, 1830–1914, then provides readers with rarely seen profiles of each of the six artists from their birth through the end of their time abroad. Finally, Leininger-Miller examines patterns and differences in these individuals' backgrounds and development, their patronage in the United States and France, their shared experiences abroad, and the impact their study in Paris had on the rest of their careers.
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To Redeem the Soul of America

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference and Martin Luther King, Jr

Author: Adam Fairclough

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820323466

Category: History

Page: 522

View: 3072

To Redeem the Soul of America looks beyond the towering figure of Martin Luther King, Jr., to disclose the full workings of the organization that supported him. As Adam Fairclough reveals the dynamics within the Southern Christian Leadership Conference he shows how Julian Bond, Jesse Jackson, Wyatt Walker, Andrew Young, and others also played a hand in the triumphs of Selma and Birmingham and the frustrations of Albany and Chicago. Joining a charismatic leader with an inspired group of activists, the SCLC built a bridge from the black proletariat to the white liberal elite and then, finally, to the halls of Congress and the White House.
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In Hope of Liberty

Culture, Community and Protest among Northern Free Blacks, 1700-1860

Author: James Oliver Horton,Lois E. Horton

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780195352368

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 2812

Prince Hall, a black veteran of the American Revolution, was insulted and disappointed but probably not surprised when white officials refused his offer of help. He had volunteered a troop of 700 Boston area blacks to help quell a rebellion of western Massachusetts farmers led by Daniel Shays during the economic turmoil in the uncertain period following independence. Many African Americans had fought for America's liberty and their own in the Revolution, but their place in the new nation was unresolved. As slavery was abolished in the North, free blacks gained greater opportunities, but still faced a long struggle against limits to their freedom, against discrimination, and against southern slavery. The lives of these men and women are vividly described in In Hope of Liberty, spanning the 200 years and eight generations from the colonial slave trade to the Civil War. In this marvelously peopled history, James and Lois Horton introduce us to a rich cast of characters. There are familiar historical figures such as Crispus Attucks, a leader of the Boston Massacre and one of the first casualties of the American Revolution; Sojourner Truth, former slave and eloquent antislavery and women's rights activist whose own family had been broken by slavery when her son became a wedding present for her owner's daughter; and Prince Whipple, George Washington's aide, easily recognizable in the portrait of Washington crossing the Delaware River. And there are the countless men and women who struggled to lead their daily lives with courage and dignity: Zilpha Elaw, a visionary revivalist who preached before crowds of thousands; David James Peck, the first black to graduate from an American medical school in 1848; Paul Cuffe, a successful seafaring merchant who became an ardent supporter of the black African colonization movement; and Nancy Prince, at eighteen the effective head of a scattered household of four siblings, each boarded in different homes, who at twenty-five was formally presented to the Russian court. In a seamless narrative weaving together all these stories and more, the Hortons describe the complex networks, both formal and informal, that made up free black society, from the black churches, which provided a sense of community and served as a training ground for black leaders and political action, to the countless newspapers which spoke eloquently of their aspirations for blacks and played an active role in the antislavery movement, to the informal networks which allowed far-flung families to maintain contact, and which provided support and aid to needy members of the free black community and to fugitives from the South. Finally, they describe the vital role of the black family, the cornerstone of this variegated and tightly knit community In Hope of Liberty brilliantly illuminates the free black communities of the antebellum North as they struggled to reconcile conflicting cultural identities and to work for social change in an atmosphere of racial injustice. As the black community today still struggles with many of the same problems, this insightful history reminds us how far we have come, and how far we have yet to go.
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Signatures of Citizenship

Petitioning, Antislavery, & Women's Political Identity

Author: Susan Zaeske

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807854266

Category: History

Page: 253

View: 9781

This history of women's antislavery petitioning shows how this form of activism not only contributed to the success of the abolitionist movement but also proved to be a watershed moment in the emergence of American women as political actors.
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The Columbia Guide to America in the 1960s

Author: David Farber,Beth Bailey

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231518072

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 549

The 1960s continue to be the subject of passionate debate and political controversy, a touchstone in struggles over the meaning of the American past and the direction of the American future. Amid the polemics and the myths, making sense of the Sixties and its legacies presents a challenge. This book is for all those who want to take it on. Because there are so many facets to this unique and transformative era, this volume offers multiple approaches and perspectives. The first section gives a lively narrative overview of the decade's major policies, events, and cultural changes. The second presents ten original interpretative essays from prominent historians about significant and controversial issues from the Vietnam War to the sexual revolution, followed by a concise encyclopedia articles organized alphabetically. This section could stand as a reference work in itself and serves to supplement the narrative. Subsequent sections include short topical essays, special subjects, a brief chronology, and finally an extensive annotated bibliography with ample information on books, films, and electronic resources for further exploration. With interesting facts, statistics, and comparisons presented in almanac style as well as the expertise of prominent scholars, The Columbia Guide to America in the 1960s is the most complete guide to an enduringly fascinating era.
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Veiled Visions

The 1906 Atlanta Race Riot and the Reshaping of American Race Relations

Author: David Fort Godshalk

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807856260

Category: History

Page: 365

View: 6712

Placing the four-day riot in a broader narrative of twentieth-century race relations in Atlanta, in the South, and in the United States, the author examines the riot's origins and how memories of this cataclysmic event that resulted in at least twenty-five black fatalities shaped black and white social and political life for decades. Simultaneous.
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Stars for Freedom

Hollywood, Black Celebrities, and the Civil Rights Movement

Author: Emilie Raymond

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295806079

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 8361

From Oprah Winfrey to Angelina Jolie, George Clooney to Leonardo DiCaprio, Americans have come to expect that Hollywood celebrities will be outspoken advocates for social and political causes. However, that wasn�t always the case. As Emilie Raymond shows, during the civil rights movement the Stars for Freedom - a handful of celebrities both black and white - risked their careers by crusading for racial equality, and forged the role of celebrity in American political culture. Focusing on the �Leading Six� trailblazers - Harry Belafonte, Ossie Davis, Ruby Dee, Sammy Davis, Jr., Dick Gregory, and Sidney Poitier - Raymond reveals how they not only advanced the civil rights movement in front of the cameras, but also worked tirelessly behind the scenes, raising money for Martin Luther King, Jr.�s legal defense, leading membership drives for the NAACP, and personally engaging with workaday activists to boost morale. Through meticulous research, engaging writing, and new interviews with key players, Raymond traces the careers of the Leading Six against the backdrop of the movement. Perhaps most revealing is the new light she sheds on Sammy Davis, Jr., exploring how his controversial public image allowed him to raise more money for the movement than any other celebrity. The result is an entertaining and informative book that will appeal to film buffs and civil rights historians alike, as well as to anyone interested in the rise of celebrity power in American society.
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Private Lives/Public Consequences

Personality and Politics in Modern America

Author: William Henry Chafe

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674029321

Category: Psychology

Page: 432

View: 7704

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Blood Done Sign My Name

A True Story

Author: Timothy B. Tyson

Publisher: Broadway Books

ISBN: 0307419932

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 1897

"Daddy and Roger and 'em shot 'em a nigger." Those words, whispered to ten-year-old Tim Tyson by one of his playmates in the late spring of 1970, heralded a firestorm that would forever transform the small tobacco market town of Oxford, North Carolina. On May 11, 1970, Henry Marrow, a 23-year-old black veteran, walked into a crossroads store owned by Robert Teel, a rough man with a criminal record and ties to the Ku Klux Klan, and came out running. Teel and two of his sons chased Marrow, beat him unmercifully, and killed him in public as he pleaded for his life. In the words of a local prosecutor: "They shot him like you or I would kill a snake." Like many small Southern towns, Oxford had barely been touched by the civil rights movement. But in the wake of the killing, young African Americans took to the streets, led by 22-year-old Ben Chavis, a future president of the NAACP. As mass protests crowded the town square, a cluster of returning Vietnam veterans organized what one termed "a military operation." While lawyers battled in the courthouse that summer in a drama that one termed "a Perry Mason kind of thing," the Ku Klux Klan raged in the shadows and black veterans torched the town's tobacco warehouses. With large sections of the town in flames, Tyson's father, the pastor of Oxford's all-white Methodist church, pressed his congregation to widen their vision of humanity and pushed the town to come to terms with its bloody racial history. In the end, however, the Tyson family was forced to move away. Years later, historian Tim Tyson returned to Oxford to ask Robert Teel why he and his sons had killed Henry Marrow. "That nigger committed suicide, coming in here wanting to four-letter-word my daughter-in-law," Teel explained. The black radicals who burned much of Oxford also told Tim their stories. "It was like we had a cash register up there at the pool hall, just ringing up how much money we done cost these white people," one of them explained. "We knew if we cost 'em enough goddamn money they was gonna start changing some things." In the tradition of To Kill a Mockingbird, Blood Done Sign My Name is a classic work of conscience, a defining portrait of a time and place that we will never forget. Tim Tyson's riveting narrative of that fiery summer and one family's struggle to build bridges in a time of destruction brings gritty blues truth, soaring gospel vision, and down-home humor to our complex history, where violence and faith, courage and evil, despair and hope all mingle to illuminate America's enduring chasm of race. From the Hardcover edition.
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The North Carolina Experience

An Interpretive and Documentary History

Author: Lindley S. Butler,Alan D. Watson

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807898899

Category: History

Page: 475

View: 8569

This collection of nineteen original essays on selected topics and epochs in North Carolina history offers a broad survey of the state from its discovery and colonization to the present. Each chapter consists of an interpretive essay on a specific aspect of North Carolina's history, a collection of supporting documents, and a brief bibliography. Selections cover historical periods ranging from Elizabethan to contemporary times and examine such issues as slavery, populism, civil rights, and the status of women. Essays address the tragedy of North Carolina's Indians, the state's role in the Revolutionary War and the Confederacy, and the impact of the Great Depression. North Carolina's place in the New South and evangelical culture in the state are also discussed. Designed as a supplementary reader for the study and teaching of North Carolina history, The North Carolina Experience will introduce college students to the process of historical research and writing. It will also be a valuable resource in secondary schools, public libraries, and the homes of those interested in North Carolina history.
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The Origins of the Civil Rights Movement

Author: Aldon D. Morris

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0029221307

Category: History

Page: 354

View: 900

A blending of scholarly research and interviews with many of the figures who launched the civil rights movement in the 1960s and 1970s records the events of the movement's tumultuous first decade
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Never Stop Running

Allard Lowenstein and the Struggle to Save American Liberalism

Author: William Henry Chafe

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780691059730

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 556

View: 8763

Summing up the experience of a whole generation of politicians, this book is an unforgettable saga of the triumph and tragedy of America's last liberal hero, Allard Lowenstein--a man desperately seeking peace in a world haunted by forbidden desires. Photos.
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Lunch at the 5 & 10

Author: Miles Wolff

Publisher: Ivan R Dee

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 204

View: 6237

A detailed account of the sit-in at a Woolworth's lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina, in 1960, which ignited the civil rights movement in the United States.
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