Citizenship and its Others

Author: Bridget Anderson,Vanessa Hughes

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137435089

Category: Political Science

Page: 208

View: 6781

This edited volume analyzes citizenship through attention to its Others, revealing the partiality of citizenship's inclusion and claims to equality by defining it as legal status, political belonging and membership rights. Established and emerging scholars explore the exclusion of migrants, welfare claimants, women, children and others.
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Citizenship and Its Discontents

Author: Niraja Gopal Jayal

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674070992

Category: Political Science

Page: 346

View: 5169

This book considers how the civic ideals embodied in India’s constitution are undermined by exclusions based on social and economic inequalities, sometimes even by its own strategies of inclusion. Once seen by Westerners as a political anomaly, India today is the case study that no global discussion of democracy and citizenship can ignore.
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Citizenship and Its Exclusions

A Classical, Constitutional, and Critical Race Critique

Author: Ediberto Román

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814776537

Category: Law

Page: 236

View: 2325

Citizenship is generally viewed as the most desired legal status an individual can attain, invoking the belief that citizens hold full inclusion in a society, and can exercise and be protected by the Constitution. Yet this membership has historically been exclusive and illusive for many, and in Citizenship and Its Exclusions, Ediberto Román offers a sweeping, interdisciplinary analysis of citizenship’s contradictions. Román offers an exploration of citizenship that spans from antiquity to the present, and crosses disciplines from history to political philosophy to law, including constitutional and critical race theories. Beginning with Greek and Roman writings on citizenship, he moves on to late-medieval and Renaissance Europe, then early Modern Western law, and culminates his analysis with an explanation of how past precedents have influenced U.S. law and policy regulating the citizenship status of indigenous and territorial island people, as well as how different levels of membership have created a de facto subordinate citizenship status for many members of American society, often lumped together as the “underclass.”
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Citizenship and Its Discontents

Author: Niraja Gopal Jayal

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674070992

Category: Political Science

Page: 346

View: 5509

This book considers how the civic ideals embodied in India’s constitution are undermined by exclusions based on social and economic inequalities, sometimes even by its own strategies of inclusion. Once seen by Westerners as a political anomaly, India today is the case study that no global discussion of democracy and citizenship can ignore.
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Equal Citizenship and Its Limits in EU Law

We The Burden?

Author: Päivi Johanna Neuvonen

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1782258175

Category: Law

Page: 232

View: 3273

The research monograph Equal Citizenship and Its Limits in EU Law: We the Burden? is a critical study of the scope of EU citizenship as an 'equal status' of all Member State nationals. The book re-conceptualises the relationship between the status of EU citizenship and EU citizens' fundamental right to equal treatment by asking what indicates the presence of agency in EU law. A thorough analysis of the case-law is used to support the argument that the present view of active citizenship in EU law fails to explain how EU citizens should be treated in relation to one another and what counts as 'related' for the purposes of equal treatment in a transnational context. In addressing these questions, the book responds to the increasing need to find a more substantive theory of justice for the European Union. The book suggests that a more balanced view of agency in the case of EU citizens can be based on the inherent connection between citizens' agency and their subjectivity. This analysis provides an integrated philosophical account of transnational equality by showing that a new source of 'meaningful relationships' for the purposes of equal treatment arises from recognizing and treating EU citizens as full subjects of EU law and European integration. The book makes a significant contribution to the existing scholarship on EU law, first, by demonstrating that the undefined nature of EU citizenship is fundamentally a question about transnational justice and not just about individual rights and, secondly, by introducing a framework within which the current normative indeterminacy of EU citizenship can be overcome.
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The Paradox of Citizenship in American Politics

Ideals and Reality

Author: Mehnaaz Momen

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319615300

Category: Political Science

Page: 265

View: 3744

“This remarkable book does the unusual: it embeds its focus in a larger complex operational space. The migrant, the refugee, the citizen, all emerge from that larger context. The focus is not the usual detailed examination of the subject herself, but that larger world of wars, grabs, contestations, and, importantly, the claimers and resisters.”— Saskia Sassen, Professor of Sociology, Columbia University, USA This thought-provoking book begins by looking at the incredible complexities of “American identity” and ends with the threats to civil liberties with the vast expansion of state power through technology. A must-read for anyone interested in the future of the promise and realities of citizenship in the modern global landscape.— Kevin R. Johnson, Dean, UC Davis School of Law, USA Momen focuses on the basic paradox that has long marked national identity: the divide between liberal egalitarian self-conception and persistent practices of exclusion and subordination. The result is a thought-provoking text that is sure to be of interest to scholars and students of the American experience. — Aziz Rana, Professor of Law, Cornell Law School, USA This book is an exploration of American citizenship, emphasizing the paradoxes that are contained, normalized, and strengthened by the gaps existing between proposed policies and real-life practices in multiple arenas of a citizen’s life. The book considers the evolution of citizenship through the journey of the American nation and its identity, its complexities of racial exclusion, its transformations in response to domestic demands and geopolitical challenges, its changing values captured in immigration policies and practices, and finally its dynamics in terms of the shift in state power vis-à-vis citizens. While it aspires to analyze the meaning of citizenship in America from the multiple perspectives of history, politics, and policy, it pays special attention to the critical junctures where rhetoric and reality clash, allowing for the production of certain paradoxes that define citizenship rights and shape political discourse.
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Between Citizens and the State

The Politics of American Higher Education in the 20th Century

Author: Christopher P. Loss

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691148279

Category: Education

Page: 320

View: 3029

This book tracks the dramatic outcomes of the federal government's growing involvement in higher education between World War I and the 1970s, and the conservative backlash against that involvement from the 1980s onward. Using cutting-edge analysis, Christopher Loss recovers higher education's central importance to the larger social and political history of the United States in the twentieth century, and chronicles its transformation into a key mediating institution between citizens and the state. Framed around the three major federal higher education policies of the twentieth century--the 1944 GI Bill, the 1958 National Defense Education Act, and the 1965 Higher Education Act--the book charts the federal government's various efforts to deploy education to ready citizens for the national, bureaucratized, and increasingly global world in which they lived. Loss details the myriad ways in which academic leaders and students shaped, and were shaped by, the state's shifting political agenda as it moved from a preoccupation with economic security during the Great Depression, to national security during World War II and the Cold War, to securing the rights of African Americans, women, and other previously marginalized groups during the 1960s and '70s. Along the way, Loss reappraises the origins of higher education's current-day diversity regime, the growth of identity group politics, and the privatization of citizenship at the close of the twentieth century. At a time when people's faith in government and higher education is being sorely tested, this book sheds new light on the close relations between American higher education and politics.
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At Home in Two Countries

The Past and Future of Dual Citizenship

Author: Peter J Spiro

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814785824

Category: Law

Page: 208

View: 6522

The rise of dual citizenship could hardly have been imaginable to a time traveler from a hundred or even fifty years ago. Dual nationality was once considered an offense to nature, an abomination on the order of bigamy. It was the stuff of titanic battles between the United States and European sovereigns. As those conflicts dissipated, dual citizenship continued to be an oddity, a condition that, if not quite freakish, was nonetheless vaguely disreputable, a status one could hold but not advertise. Even today, some Americans mistakenly understand dual citizenship to somehow be “illegal”, when in fact it is completely tolerated. Only recently has the status largely shed the opprobrium to which it was once attached. At Home in Two Countries charts the history of dual citizenship from strong disfavor to general acceptance. The status has touched many; there are few Americans who do not have someone in their past or present who has held the status, if only unknowingly. The history reflects on the course of the state as an institution at the level of the individual. The state was once a jealous institution, justifiably demanding an exclusive relationship with its members. Today, the state lacks both the capacity and the incentive to suppress the status as citizenship becomes more like other forms of membership. Dual citizenship allows many to formalize sentimental attachments. For others, it’s a new way to game the international system. This book explains why dual citizenship was once so reviled, why it is a fact of life after globalization, and why it should be embraced today.
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Citizens, Experts, and the Environment

The Politics of Local Knowledge

Author: Frank Fischer

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822326229

Category: Political Science

Page: 336

View: 8821

The tension between professional expertise and democratic governance has become increasingly significant in Western politics. Environmental politics in particular is a hotbed for citizens who actively challenge the imposition of expert theories that ignore particular local knowledge that can help to relate technical facts to social values. In Citizens, Experts, and the Environment Frank Fischer explores this often strained interaction between technical environmental experts and citizen participants and proposes a new model of politics based on participatory inquiry and citizen-expert synergy. Where information ideologues see the modern increase in information as capable of making everyone smarter, others see the emergence of a society divided between those with and those without knowledge. Suggesting realistic strategies to bridge this divide, Fischer calls for meaningful non-expert involvement in policymaking and shows how the deliberations of ordinary citizens can help solve complex social and environmental problems by contributing non-technical knowledge to the professionals' expertise. While incorporating theoretical critiques of positivism and methodology, he also offers hard evidence to demonstrate that the ordinary citizen is capable of a great deal more participation than is generally recognised. Recent situations in Copenhagen, Denmark; Woburn, Massachusetts; and Kerala, India, serve as models of the participatory inquiry he proposes, showing how the local knowledge of citizens is invaluable to policy formation. In his conclusion Fischer moves his model from the context of environmental issues to the larger societal issues of deliberative structures and participatory democracy. This study will interest political scientists, public policy practitioners, sociologists, scientists, environmentalists, activists, urban planners, and public administrators along with those interested in understanding the relationship between democracy and science in a modern technological society.
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Politics

Author: Aristotle

Publisher: Jazzybee Verlag

ISBN: 3849648397

Category: Philosophy

Page: 250

View: 660

Politics is Aristotle's most known work on political philosophy. The treatise is the logical sequel to the Nicomachean Ethics, as both works deal with the "philosophy of human affairs." The whole treatise consists of eight books and chapters about constitutions, democracy, oligarchy, citizenships, states and political theories.
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The Palgrave Handbook of Global Citizenship and Education

Author: Ian Davies,Li-Ching Ho,Dina Kiwan,Carla L. Peck,Andrew Peterson,Edda Sant,Yusef Waghid

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 113759733X

Category: Education

Page: 658

View: 3297

This Handbook is a much needed international reference work, written by leading writers in the field of global citizenship and education. It is based on the most recent research and practice from across the world, with the 'Geographically-Based Overviews' section providing summaries of global citizenship and education provided for Southern Africa, Australasia, Europe, the Middle East, North America, Latin America, and East and South East Asia. The Handbook discusses, in the 'Key Ideologies' section, the philosophies that influence the meaning of global citizenship and education, including neo-liberalism and global capitalism; nationalism and internationalism; and issues of post-colonialism, indigeneity, and transnationalism. Next, the 'Key Concepts' section explores the ideas that underpin debates about global citizenship and education, with particular attention paid to issues of justice, equity, diversity, identity, and sustainable development. With these key concepts in place, the 'Principal Perspectives and Contexts' section turns to exploring global citizenship and education from a wide variety of viewpoints, including economic, political, cultural, moral, environmental, spiritual and religious, as well as taking into consideration issues of ethnicity, gender and sexuality, and social class. Finally, the 'Key Issues in the Teaching of Global Citizenship' section discusses how education can be provided through school subjects and study abroad programmes, as well as through other means including social media and online assessment, and political activism. This Handbook will be vital reading for academics, postgraduates and advanced undergraduates in the fields of sociology and education, particularly those with an interest in comparative studies.
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Americans in Waiting

The Lost Story of Immigration and Citizenship in the United States

Author: Hiroshi Motomura

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199887439

Category: Law

Page: 256

View: 7155

Although America is unquestionably a nation of immigrants, its immigration policies have inspired more questions than consensus on who should be admitted and what the path to citizenship should be. In Americans in Waiting, Hiroshi Motomura looks to a forgotten part of our past to show how, for over 150 years, immigration was assumed to be a transition to citizenship, with immigrants essentially being treated as future citizens--Americans in waiting. Challenging current conceptions, the author deftly uncovers how this view, once so central to law and policy, has all but vanished. Motomura explains how America could create a more unified society by recovering this lost history and by giving immigrants more, but at the same time asking more of them. A timely, panoramic chronicle of immigration and citizenship in the United States, Americans in Waiting offers new ideas and a fresh perspective on current debates.
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The Citizen and the Alien

Dilemmas of Contemporary Membership

Author: Linda Bosniak

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400827510

Category: Political Science

Page: 248

View: 3495

Citizenship presents two faces. Within a political community it stands for inclusion and universalism, but to outsiders, citizenship means exclusion. Because these aspects of citizenship appear spatially and jurisdictionally separate, they are usually regarded as complementary. In fact, the inclusionary and exclusionary dimensions of citizenship dramatically collide within the territory of the nation-state, creating multiple contradictions when it comes to the class of people the law calls aliens--transnational migrants with a status short of full citizenship. Examining alienage and alienage law in all of its complexities, The Citizen and the Alien explores the dilemmas of inclusion and exclusion inherent in the practices and institutions of citizenship in liberal democratic societies, especially the United States. In doing so, it offers an important new perspective on the changing meaning of citizenship in a world of highly porous borders and increasing transmigration. As a particular form of noncitizenship, alienage represents a powerful lens through which to examine the meaning of citizenship itself, argues Linda Bosniak. She uses alienage to examine the promises and limits of the "equal citizenship" ideal that animates many constitutional democracies. In the process, she shows how core features of globalization serve to shape the structure of legal and social relationships at the very heart of national societies.
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The Psychology of Citizenship and Civic Engagement

Author: S. Mark Pancer

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0199752125

Category: Psychology

Page: 211

View: 5780

In The Psychology of Citizenship and Civic Engagement, S. Mark Pancer explores the development of civic engagement, the factors that influence its development, and the impacts of civic involvement on the individual, the community, and society. Citizens' sense of responsibility to their community and to their nation is becoming a topic of growing concern. Recent research indicates that citizens of the United States and many other nations have become increasingly disconnected from their fellow community members, and when this connection is lost, individuals begin to suffer. They experience poorer health, achieve lower academic and employment success, and are at risk for the development of a host of social problems. On a broader level, states and countries whose citizens feel detached from their communities show higher levels of crime, a greater incidence of disease, and even higher mortality rates. In The Psychology of Citizenship and Civic Engagement, S. Mark Pancer explores the development of civic engagement, the factors that influence its development, and the impacts of civic involvement on the individual, the community, and society. Pancer examines civic engagement over the lifespan and how the effects of early experiences and influences exerted by peers, families, and religious organizations shape adult involvement. By addressing civic engagement from a systemic as well as individual perspective, this book discusses the role that factors such as government policy, culture, and socioeconomic status play in fostering (or inhibiting) a person's civic connections. Pancer also works toward a solution to increase active citizenship by identifying gaps in research and theory and outlining ways in which scholarly work on civic engagement can inform policy and practice, with the aim to foster individuals sense of responsibility and community connection. By bringing together a large body of research from psychology, political science, sociol
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Citizenship and Social Theory

Author: Bryan S Turner

Publisher: SAGE Publications Limited

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 208

View: 9026

Going beyond both traditional liberal theories of democracy and Marxist theories of civil society, leading international scholars rethink the relations between the individual and the state, community and family. They assess how social and political participation is changing in the modern world, investigate the historical roots of citizenship and its development alongside the nation state and urban society, and relate it to issues of welfare and the market. The final chapter asks whether the subordination of nation states to supranational institutions will replace state citizenship with a global conception of human rights.
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Children, Citizenship, and Environment

Nurturing a Democratic Imagination in a Changing World

Author: Bronwyn Hayward

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1849714363

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 190

View: 5372

Her comparative discussion with the US and UK draws on lessons from New Zealand, a country where young citizens often express a strong sense of personal responsibility for their planet but where many children also face shocking social conditions. Hayward develops a 'SEEDS' model of ecological citizenship education (Social agency, Environmental Education, Embedded justice, Decentred deliberative democracy and Self transcendence). The discussion considers how the SEEDs model can support young citizens' democratic imagination and develop their 'handprint' for social justice.From eco-worriers and citizen-scientists to streetwise sceptics, "Children, Citizenship and Environment" identifies a variety of forms of citizenship and discusses why many approaches make it more difficult, not easier, for young citizens to effect change.
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The Ethics of Multiple Citizenship

Author: Ana Tanasoca

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108429157

Category: Law

Page: 220

View: 2339

Originally presented as the author's thesis (doctoral)--University of Essex, 2015.
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Citizenship and Social Class

Author: Trevor Marshall,Tom Bottomore

Publisher: Pluto Press

ISBN: 9780745304762

Category: Political Science

Page: 102

View: 8663

Over forty years after it first appeared, T.H. Marshall's seminal essay on citizenship and social class in postwar Britain has acquired the status of a classic. His lucid analysis of the principal elements of citizenship -- namely, the possession of civil, political and social rights -- is as relevant today as it was when it first appeared. It is reissued here with a complementary monography by Tom Bottomore in which the meaning of citizenship is re-examined, in very different historical circumstances. In asking how far the prospects for class equality have been realised, Bottomore continues the discussion in a context that encompasses the restoration of civil and political rights in Eastern Europe, problems of welfare capitalism, citizenship and the nation state and the broader issues of equality and democratic institutions.
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World Citizenship

Cosmopolitan Thinking and Its Opponents

Author: Derek Heater

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9780826477545

Category: Political Science

Page: 210

View: 7053

Recent years have seen the development of a substantial literature on cosmopolitan political thought and the idea of world citizenship. In this book Derek Heater offers a concise and accessible survey of this complex debate. He aims both to interpret these concepts and to assist in their comprehension. Central to the organization of the book is Heater's claim that the notion of world citizenship remains weak unless it is able to stand alongside and be comparable to citizenship in its traditional state-embedded sense. Thus, the core chapters are arranged according to a basic breakdown of the key components of citizenship, covering: identity and morality; law and civil rights; social, economic and environmental citizenship; political citizenship; and competence and education. The author outlines and assesses both supporting and opposing arguments, illustrating his analysis with wide-ranging historical and political references, from the Stoics to the present day. This is an essential text for those studying citizenship and will also be of great interest to students of political theory.
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How Race Is Made in America

Immigration, Citizenship, and the Historical Power of Racial Scripts

Author: Natalia Molina

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520280075

Category: History

Page: 207

View: 1858

How Race Is Made in America examines Mexican Americans—from 1924, when American law drastically reduced immigration into the United States, to 1965, when many quotas were abolished—to understand how broad themes of race and citizenship are constructed. These years shaped the emergence of what Natalia Molina describes as an immigration regime, which defined the racial categories that continue to influence perceptions in the United States about Mexican Americans, race, and ethnicity. Molina demonstrates that despite the multiplicity of influences that help shape our concept of race, common themes prevail. Examining legal, political, social, and cultural sources related to immigration, she advances the theory that our understanding of race is socially constructed in relational ways—that is, in correspondence to other groups. Molina introduces and explains her central theory, racial scripts, which highlights the ways in which the lives of racialized groups are linked across time and space and thereby affect one another. How Race Is Made in America also shows that these racial scripts are easily adopted and adapted to apply to different racial groups.
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