Cinema and the Invention of Modern Life

Author: Leo Charney

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520201125

Category: History

Page: 409

View: 9329

"This is one of the finest, freshest, and most suggestive anthologies I've come across in recent years."--Stuart Liebman, City University of New York Graduate Center
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Spectacular Realities

Early Mass Culture in Fin-de-Siècle Paris

Author: Vanessa R. Schwartz

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520221680

Category: History

Page: 230

View: 2782

"An exciting, innovative, and significant work. The author points to how the crowd experience transcended class and gender divisions and was transformed from acts of collective violence into acts of collective consumption."—Michael B. Miller, author of Shanghai on the Métro
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Empty Moments

Cinema, Modernity, and Drift

Author: Leo Charney

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822320906

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 189

View: 9102

An innovative reconceptualization of the defining quality of modernity and how it relates to cinema and literary theory.
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Museum Movies

The Museum of Modern Art and the Birth of Art Cinema

Author: Haidee Wasson

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520241312

Category: Art

Page: 314

View: 1398

In 1935, the foundation of the Film Library of the Museum of Modern Art in New York marked the transformation of the film medium from a passing amusement to an enduring art form. Haidee Wasson maps the work of the MoMA film library as it pioneered the preservation of film & promoted the concept of art cinema.
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Fight Pictures

A History of Boxing and Early Cinema

Author: Dan Streible

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520250753

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 396

View: 9967

"This compelling book forces us to rethink the history of cinema. Dan Streible's thought-provoking rediscovery of an entire lost genre of hundreds of early films reminds us how much we still do not know about the development of American movie culture. The fact that only a fraction of these forgotten films survive, and those mostly in fragments, makes this historical account of them all the more valuable."—Martin Scorsese "Men in skimpy clothing engaged in the manly art of beating on each other became the cinema's very first movie stars. With masterful historical research in both film and sport history, Dan Streible's book provides the definitive account of the complex fascination these first films exerted, as prizefighting collided with early cinema and staged new battles over gender, race and class."—Tom Gunning, author of D. W. Griffith and the Origins of American Narrative Film, and The Films of Fritz Lang "'Sporting' men and curious women, slumming elites and working-class laborers, nativists and European immigrants, Great White Hopes and insurgent African Americans—Dan Streible's meticulous research brings to life the dynamic, overlapping, and often contentious public spheres that fight films pull into focus. Written in smart and straightforward prose, Fight Pictures combines new critical insights about early cinema's aesthetics of display and struggles for cultural legitimacy with the social histories of boxing and American modernity.”—Jacqueline Stewart, author of Migrating to the Movies: Cinema and Black Urban Modernity
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The Invention of Hugo Cabret

Author: Brian Selznick

Publisher: Scholastic

ISBN: 1407166573

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 534

View: 2025

ORPHAN, CLOCK KEEPER, AND THIEF, twelve-year-old Hugo lives in the walls of a busy Paris train station, where his survival depends on secrets and anonymity. But when his world suddenly interlocks with an eccentric girl and her grandfather, Hugo's undercover life, and his most precious secret, are put in jeopardy. A cryptic drawing, a treasured notebook, a stolen key, a mechanical man, and a hidden message from Hugo's dead father form the backbone of this intricate, tender, and spellbinding mystery.
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Nippon Modern

Japanese Cinema of the 1920s And 1930s

Author: Mitsuyo Wada-Marciano

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN: 0824831829

Category: History

Page: 185

View: 9164

Nippon Modern is the first intensive study of Japanese cinema in the 1920s and 1930s, a period in which the country's film industry was at its most prolific and a time when cinema played a singular role in shaping Japanese modernity. During the interwar period, the signs of modernity were ubiquitous in Japan's urban architecture, literature, fashion, advertising, popular music, and cinema. The reconstruction of Tokyo following the disastrous earthquake of 1923 highlighted the extent of this cultural transformation, and the film industry embraced the reconfigured space as an expression of the modern. Shochiku Kamata Film Studios (1920-1936), the focus of this study, was the only studio that continued filmmaking in Tokyo following the city's complete destruction. Mitsuyo Wada-Marciano points to the influence of the new urban culture in Shochiku's interwar films, acclaimed as modan na eiga, or modern films, by and for Japanese. Wada-Marciano's thought-provoking examinations illustrate the reciprocal relationship between cinema and Japan's vernacular modernity--what Japanese modernity actually meant to Japanese. Her thorough and thoughtful analyses of dozens of films within the cultural contexts of Japan contribute to the current inquiry into non-Western vernacular modernities.
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Electric Dreamland

Amusement Parks, Movies, and American Modernity

Author: Lauren Rabinovitz

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231527217

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 256

View: 3289

Amusement parks were the playgrounds of the working class in the early twentieth century, combining numerous, mechanically-based spectacles into one unique, modern cultural phenomenon. Lauren Rabinovitz describes the urban modernity engendered by these parks and their media, encouraging ordinary individuals to sense, interpret, and embody a burgeoning national identity. As industrialization, urbanization, and immigration upended society, amusement parks tempered the shocks of racial, ethnic, and cultural conflict while shrinking the distinctions between gender and class. Following the rise of American parks from 1896 to 1918, Rabinovitz seizes on a simultaneous increase in cinema and spectacle audiences and connects both to the success of leisure activities in stabilizing society. Critics of the time often condemned parks and movies for inciting moral decline, yet in fact they fostered women's independence, racial uplift, and assimilation. The rhythmic, mechanical movements of spectacle also conditioned audiences to process multiple stimuli. Featuring illustrations from private collections and accounts from unaccessed archives, Electric Dreamland joins film and historical analyses in a rare portrait of mass entertainment and the modern eye.
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Alice & Eiffel

A New History of Early Cinema and the Love Story Kept Secret for a Century

Author: Janelle Dietrick

Publisher: BookBaby

ISBN: 1682227677

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 400

View: 5258

Alice Guy Blaché became the first film director in 1896 while she was working in Paris at Gaumont, one of the earliest manufacturers of the motion picture camera. The first films were only a minute long and thought to be scientific novelties until Alice decided to stage a scene and film a narrative. Gustave Eiffel was president of the Gaumont company from its inception in 1895, but Alice did not meet him there. For a century, Eiffel has been thought to be merely a silent partner in the Gaumont company, but in fact he guided the company from its inception. While president during its first eleven years, he advanced both the business and technology of the motion picture. For eleven years, Alice made films in Paris and then in 1907 she came to the United States, where she wrote and directed hundreds of longer films in New York and Fort Lee, New Jersey, before Hollywood became the center of the film industry. Alice wrote a memoir that was published in 1976. Her relationship to Eiffel and the role he played in her life is alluded to but well camouflaged. The brevity of Alice's memoirs, little more than a hundred pages, has flummoxed researchers for decades. This book is about what Alice's memoirs leave out―the people introduced but not described, the difficulties alluded to but minimized, the losses and triumphs barely mentioned, and the love story she felt compelled to keep secret.
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How the Scots Invented the Modern World

The True Story of How Western Europe's Poorest Nation Created Our World and Ever ything in It

Author: Arthur Herman

Publisher: Broadway Books

ISBN: 9780307420954

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 3739

An exciting account of the origins of the modern world Who formed the first literate society? Who invented our modern ideas of democracy and free market capitalism? The Scots. As historian and author Arthur Herman reveals, in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries Scotland made crucial contributions to science, philosophy, literature, education, medicine, commerce, and politics—contributions that have formed and nurtured the modern West ever since. Herman has charted a fascinating journey across the centuries of Scottish history. Here is the untold story of how John Knox and the Church of Scotland laid the foundation for our modern idea of democracy; how the Scottish Enlightenment helped to inspire both the American Revolution and the U.S. Constitution; and how thousands of Scottish immigrants left their homes to create the American frontier, the Australian outback, and the British Empire in India and Hong Kong. How the Scots Invented the Modern World reveals how Scottish genius for creating the basic ideas and institutions of modern life stamped the lives of a series of remarkable historical figures, from James Watt and Adam Smith to Andrew Carnegie and Arthur Conan Doyle, and how Scottish heroes continue to inspire our contemporary culture, from William “Braveheart” Wallace to James Bond. And no one who takes this incredible historical trek will ever view the Scots—or the modern West—in the same way again.
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Cinema, Emergence, and the Films of Satyajit Ray

Author: Keya Ganguly

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520946049

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 274

View: 665

Although revered as one of the world’s great filmmakers, the Indian director Satyajit Ray is described either in narrowly nationalistic terms or as an artist whose critique of modernity is largely derived from European ideas. Rarely is he seen as an influential modernist in his own right whose contributions to world cinema remain unsurpassed. In this benchmark study, Keya Ganguly situates Ray’s work within the internationalist spirit of the twentieth century, arguing that his film experiments revive the category of political or "committed" art. She suggests that in their depictions of Indian life, Ray’s films intimate the sense of a radical future and document the capacity of the image to conceptualize a different world glimpsed in the remnants of a disappearing past.
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Israeli Cinema

East/West and the Politics of Representation

Author: Ella Shohat

Publisher: I. B. Tauris

ISBN: 9781845113131

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 416

View: 7859

When the Hebrew edition of this groundbreaking book came out, it provoked a stormy public debate. This is a new edition of Israeli Cinema with a substantial new postscript that reflects on the book’s initial reception and points to exciting new trends in the cinematic representation of Israel and Palestine. Ella Shohat explores the cinema as a productive site of national culture, dating back to the early Zionist films about turn-of-the-century Palestine. She offers a deconstructionist reading of Zionism, viewing the cinema as itself participating in the "invention" of the nation. Unthinking the Eurocentric imaginary of "East versus West," Shohat highlights the paradoxes of an anomalous national/colonial project through a number of salient issues, including the Sabra figure as a negation of the "Diaspora Jew," the iconography of the land of Israel as a denial of Palestine, and the narrative role of "the good Arab." The new postscript examines the emergence of a richly multiperspectival cinematic space that transcends earlier dichotomies through a palimpsestic and cross-border approach to Israel / Palestine.
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Living Pictures

The Origins of the Movies

Author: Deac Rossell

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9780791437681

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 188

View: 6226

A history of the near-simultaneous emergence of moving pictures in several countries in the mid-1890s and a thorough reevaluation of the development of the technology.CHOICE Outstanding Academic Book 1999
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Cinema, Transnationalism, and Colonial India

Entertaining the Raj

Author: Babli Sinha

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113676500X

Category: History

Page: 158

View: 9359

Through the lens of cinema, this book explores the ways in which the United States, Britain and India impacted each other politically, culturally and ideologically. It argues that American films of the 1920s posited alternative notions of whiteness and the West to that of Britain, which stood for democracy and social mobility even at a time of virulent racism. The book examines the impact that the American cinema has on Indian filmmakers of the period, who were integrating its conventions with indigenous artistic traditions to articulate an Indian modernity. It considers the way American films in the 1920s presented an orientalist fantasy of Asia, which occluded the harsh realities of anti-Asian sentiment and legislation in the period as well as the exciting engagement of anti-imperial activists who sought to use the United States as the base of a transnational network. The book goes on to analyse the American ‘empire films’ of the 1930s, which adapted British narratives of empire to represent the United States as a new global paradigm. Presenting close readings of films, literature and art from the era, the book engages cinema studies with theories of post-colonialism and transnationalism, and provides a novel approach to the study of Indian cinema.
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Cinematic Appeals

The Experience of New Movie Technologies

Author: Ariel Rogers

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231535783

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 352

View: 5507

Cinematic Appeals follows the effect of technological innovation on the cinema experience, specifically the introduction of widescreen and stereoscopic 3D systems in the 1950s, the rise of digital cinema in the 1990s, and the transition to digital 3D since 2005. Widescreen cinema promised to draw the viewer into the world of the screen, enabling larger-than-life close-ups of already larger-than-life actors. This technology fostered the illusion of physically entering a film, enhancing the semblance of realism. Alternatively, the digital era was less concerned with the viewer's physical response and more with information flow, awe, and the reevaluation of spatiality and embodiment. This study ultimately shows how cinematic technology and the human experience shape and respond to each other over time.
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The Look of Things

Poetry and Vision around 1900

Author: Carsten Strathausen

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807863238

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 344

View: 4177

Examining the relationship between German poetry, philosophy, and visual media around 1900, Carsten Strathausen argues that the poetic works of Rainer Maria Rilke, Hugo von Hofmannsthal, and Stephan George focused on the visible gestalt of language as a means of competing aesthetically with the increasing popularity and "reality effect" of photography and film. Poetry around 1900 self-reflectively celebrated its own words as both transparent signs and material objects, Strathausen says. In Aestheticism, this means that language harbors the potential to literally present the things it signifies. Rather than simply describing or picturing the physical experience of looking, as critics have commonly maintained, modernist poetry claims to enable a more profound kind of perception that grants intuitive insights into the very texture of the natural world.
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Cinematic Perspectives on Digital Culture

Consorting with the Machine

Author: Norman Taylor

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137284625

Category: Social Science

Page: 242

View: 9604

Exploring research into mobile phone use as props to subjective identity, Norman Taylor employs concepts from Michelle Foucault, Gilles Deleuze and actor network theory to discuss the affect of mechanisms of make-believe, from celebrity culture to avatar-obsessed game players, and digital culture.
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Explorations in New Cinema History

Approaches and Case Studies

Author: Richard Maltby,Daniel Biltereyst,Philippe Meers

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1444396404

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 352

View: 7511

Explorations in New Cinema History brings together cutting-edge research by the leading scholars in the field to identify new approaches to writing and understanding the social and cultural history of cinema, focusing on cinema’s audiences, the experience of cinema, and the cinema as a site of social and cultural exchange. Includes contributions from Robert Allen, Annette Kuhn, John Sedwick, Mark Jancovich, Peter Sanfield, and Kathryn Fuller-Seeley among others Develops the original argument that the social history of cinema-going and of the experience of cinema should take precedence over production- and text-based analyses Explores the cinema as a site of social and cultural exchange, including patterns of popularity and taste, the role of individual movie theatres in creating and sustaining their audiences, and the commercial, political and legal aspects of film exhibition and distribution Prompts readers to reassess their understanding of key periods of cinema history, opening up cinema studies to long-overdue conversations with other disciplines in the humanities and social sciences Presents rigorous empirical research, drawing on digital technology and geospatial information systems to provide illuminating insights in to the uses of cinema
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The Filming of Modern Life

European Avant-Garde Film of the 1920s

Author: Malcolm Turvey

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262525119

Category: Art

Page: 232

View: 6102

In the 1920s, the European avant-garde embraced the cinema, experimenting with the medium in radical ways. Painters including Hans Richter and Fernand Léger as well as filmmakers belonging to such avant-garde movements as Dada and surrealism made some of the most enduring and fascinating films in the history of cinema. In The Filming of Modern Life, Malcolm Turvey examines five films from the avant-garde canon and the complex, sometimes contradictory, attitudes toward modernity they express: Rhythm 21 (Hans Richter, 1921), Ballet mécanique (Dudley Murphy and Fernand Léger, 1924), Entr'acte (Francis Picabia and René Clair, 1924), Un chien Andalou (Salvador Dalí and Luis Buñuel, 1929), and Man with a Movie Camera (Dziga Vertov, 1929). All exemplify major trends within European avant-garde cinema of the time, from abstract animation to "cinéma pur." All five films embrace and resist, in their own ways, different aspects of modernity.
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