Cinema and the Invention of Modern Life

Author: Leo Charney

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520201125

Category: History

Page: 409

View: 4924

"This is one of the finest, freshest, and most suggestive anthologies I've come across in recent years."--Stuart Liebman, City University of New York Graduate Center
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Empty Moments

Cinema, Modernity, and Drift

Author: Leo Charney

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822320906

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 189

View: 7008

An innovative reconceptualization of the defining quality of modernity and how it relates to cinema and literary theory.
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Spectacular Realities

Early Mass Culture in Fin-de-Siècle Paris

Author: Vanessa R. Schwartz

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520221680

Category: History

Page: 230

View: 599

"An exciting, innovative, and significant work. The author points to how the crowd experience transcended class and gender divisions and was transformed from acts of collective violence into acts of collective consumption."—Michael B. Miller, author of Shanghai on the Métro
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Electric Dreamland

Amusement Parks, Movies, and American Modernity

Author: Lauren Rabinovitz

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231527217

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 256

View: 1656

Amusement parks were the playgrounds of the working class in the early twentieth century, combining numerous, mechanically-based spectacles into one unique, modern cultural phenomenon. Lauren Rabinovitz describes the urban modernity engendered by these parks and their media, encouraging ordinary individuals to sense, interpret, and embody a burgeoning national identity. As industrialization, urbanization, and immigration upended society, amusement parks tempered the shocks of racial, ethnic, and cultural conflict while shrinking the distinctions between gender and class. Following the rise of American parks from 1896 to 1918, Rabinovitz seizes on a simultaneous increase in cinema and spectacle audiences and connects both to the success of leisure activities in stabilizing society. Critics of the time often condemned parks and movies for inciting moral decline, yet in fact they fostered women's independence, racial uplift, and assimilation. The rhythmic, mechanical movements of spectacle also conditioned audiences to process multiple stimuli. Featuring illustrations from private collections and accounts from unaccessed archives, Electric Dreamland joins film and historical analyses in a rare portrait of mass entertainment and the modern eye.
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Cinematic Appeals

The Experience of New Movie Technologies

Author: Ariel Rogers

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231535783

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 352

View: 813

Cinematic Appeals follows the effect of technological innovation on the cinema experience, specifically the introduction of widescreen and stereoscopic 3D systems in the 1950s, the rise of digital cinema in the 1990s, and the transition to digital 3D since 2005. Widescreen cinema promised to draw the viewer into the world of the screen, enabling larger-than-life close-ups of already larger-than-life actors. This technology fostered the illusion of physically entering a film, enhancing the semblance of realism. Alternatively, the digital era was less concerned with the viewer's physical response and more with information flow, awe, and the reevaluation of spatiality and embodiment. This study ultimately shows how cinematic technology and the human experience shape and respond to each other over time.
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The Look of Things

Poetry and Vision around 1900

Author: Carsten Strathausen

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807863238

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 344

View: 8166

Examining the relationship between German poetry, philosophy, and visual media around 1900, Carsten Strathausen argues that the poetic works of Rainer Maria Rilke, Hugo von Hofmannsthal, and Stephan George focused on the visible gestalt of language as a means of competing aesthetically with the increasing popularity and "reality effect" of photography and film. Poetry around 1900 self-reflectively celebrated its own words as both transparent signs and material objects, Strathausen says. In Aestheticism, this means that language harbors the potential to literally present the things it signifies. Rather than simply describing or picturing the physical experience of looking, as critics have commonly maintained, modernist poetry claims to enable a more profound kind of perception that grants intuitive insights into the very texture of the natural world.
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Cinematic Perspectives on Digital Culture

Consorting with the Machine

Author: Norman Taylor

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137284625

Category: Social Science

Page: 242

View: 4762

Exploring research into mobile phone use as props to subjective identity, Norman Taylor employs concepts from Michelle Foucault, Gilles Deleuze and actor network theory to discuss the affect of mechanisms of make-believe, from celebrity culture to avatar-obsessed game players, and digital culture.
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Cinema, Transnationalism, and Colonial India

Entertaining the Raj

Author: Babli Sinha

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113676500X

Category: History

Page: 158

View: 5130

Through the lens of cinema, this book explores the ways in which the United States, Britain and India impacted each other politically, culturally and ideologically. It argues that American films of the 1920s posited alternative notions of whiteness and the West to that of Britain, which stood for democracy and social mobility even at a time of virulent racism. The book examines the impact that the American cinema has on Indian filmmakers of the period, who were integrating its conventions with indigenous artistic traditions to articulate an Indian modernity. It considers the way American films in the 1920s presented an orientalist fantasy of Asia, which occluded the harsh realities of anti-Asian sentiment and legislation in the period as well as the exciting engagement of anti-imperial activists who sought to use the United States as the base of a transnational network. The book goes on to analyse the American ‘empire films’ of the 1930s, which adapted British narratives of empire to represent the United States as a new global paradigm. Presenting close readings of films, literature and art from the era, the book engages cinema studies with theories of post-colonialism and transnationalism, and provides a novel approach to the study of Indian cinema.
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Counter-Archive

Film, the Everyday, and Albert Kahn's Archives de la Planète

Author: Paula Amad

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231509073

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 480

View: 2495

Tucked away in a garden on the edge of Paris is a multimedia archive like no other: Albert Kahn's Archives de la Planète (1908-1931). Kahn's vast photo-cinematographic experiment preserved world memory through the privileged lens of everyday life, and Counter-Archive situates this project in its biographic, intellectual, and cinematic contexts. Tracing the archive's key influences, such as the philosopher Henri Bergson, the geographer Jean Brunhes, and the biologist Jean Comandon, Paula Amad maps an alternative landscape of French cultural modernity in which vitalist philosophy cross-pollinated with early film theory, documentary film with the avant-garde, cinematic models of temporality with the early Annales school of history, and film's appropriation of the planet with human geography and colonial ideology. At the heart of the book is an insightful meditation upon the transformed concept of the archive in the age of cinema and an innovative argument about film's counter-archival challenge to history. The first comprehensive study of Kahn's films, Counter-Archive also offers a vital historical perspective on debates involving archives, media, and memory.
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Sensational Subjects

The Dramatization of Experience in the Modern World

Author: John Jervis

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472535642

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 224

View: 2864

Under what conditions does 'sensation' become 'sensational'? In the early nineteenth century murder was a staple of the sensationalizing popular press and gruesome descriptions were deployed to make a direct impact on the sensations of the reader. By the end of the century, public concern with the thrills, spills, and shocks of modern life was increasingly articulated in the language of sensation. Media sensationalism contributed to this process and magnified its impact, just as sensation was, in turn, taken up by literature, art and film. In the contemporary world the dramatization of these experiences in an era of media panics over terrorism and paedophilia has taken an overtly melodramatic form, in which battles of good and evil play out across the landscapes of our lives. Sensational Subjects develops an innovative, interdisciplinary approach to exploring these themes, their impact and their implications for understanding the modern world. A companion volume, Sympathetic Sentiments: Affect, Emotion and Spectacle in the Modern World is published simultaneously by Bloomsbury.
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Explorations in New Cinema History

Approaches and Case Studies

Author: Richard Maltby,Daniel Biltereyst,Philippe Meers

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1444396404

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 352

View: 3268

Explorations in New Cinema History brings together cutting-edge research by the leading scholars in the field to identify new approaches to writing and understanding the social and cultural history of cinema, focusing on cinema’s audiences, the experience of cinema, and the cinema as a site of social and cultural exchange. Includes contributions from Robert Allen, Annette Kuhn, John Sedwick, Mark Jancovich, Peter Sanfield, and Kathryn Fuller-Seeley among others Develops the original argument that the social history of cinema-going and of the experience of cinema should take precedence over production- and text-based analyses Explores the cinema as a site of social and cultural exchange, including patterns of popularity and taste, the role of individual movie theatres in creating and sustaining their audiences, and the commercial, political and legal aspects of film exhibition and distribution Prompts readers to reassess their understanding of key periods of cinema history, opening up cinema studies to long-overdue conversations with other disciplines in the humanities and social sciences Presents rigorous empirical research, drawing on digital technology and geospatial information systems to provide illuminating insights in to the uses of cinema
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Eye of the Century

Film, Experience, Modernity

Author: Francesco Casetti

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231511493

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 288

View: 5301

Is it true that film in the twentieth century experimented with vision more than any other art form? And what visions did it privilege? In this brilliant book, acclaimed film scholar Francesco Casetti situates the cinematic experience within discourses of twentieth-century modernity. He suggests that film defined a unique gaze, not only because it recorded many of the century's most important events, but also because it determined the manner in which they were received. Casetti begins by examining film's nature as a medium in an age obsessed with immediacy, nearness, and accessibility. He considers the myths and rituals cinema constructed on the screen and in the theater and how they provided new images and behaviors that responded to emerging concerns, ideas, and social orders. Film also succeeded in negotiating the different needs of modernity, comparing and uniting conflicting stimuli, providing answers in a world torn apart by conflict, and satisfying a desire for everydayness, as well as lightness, in people's lives. The ability to communicate, the power to inform, and the capacity to negotiate-these are the three factors that defined film's function and outlook and made the medium a relevant and vital art form of its time. So what kind of gaze did film create? Film cultivated a personal gaze, intimately tied to the emergence of point of view, but also able to restore the immediacy of the real; a complex gaze, in which reality and imagination were combined; a piercing gaze, achieved by machine, and yet deeply anthropomorphic; an excited gaze, rich in perceptive stimuli, but also attentive to the spectator's orientation; and an immersive gaze, which gave the impression of being inside the seen world while also maintaining a sense of distance. Each of these gazes combined two different qualities and balanced them. The result was an ever inventive synthesis that strived to bring about true compromises without ever sacrificing the complexity of contradiction. As Casetti demonstrates, film proposed a vision that, in making opposites permeable, modeled itself on an oxymoronic principle. In this sense, film is the key to reading and understanding the modern experience.
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Cinema

A Visual Anthropology

Author: Gordon Gray

Publisher: Berg

ISBN: 1847887600

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 192

View: 4065

Cinema: A Visual Anthropology provides a clear and concise summary of the key ideas, debates, and texts of the most important approaches to the study of fiction film from around the world. The book examines ways to address film and film experience beyond the study of the audience. Cross-disciplinary in scope, Cinema uses ideas and approaches both from within and outside of anthropology to further students' knowledge of and interest in fiction film. Including selected, globally based case studies to highlight and exemplify important issues, the book also contains suggested Further Reading for each chapter, for students to expand their learning independently. Exploring fundamental methods and approaches to engage this most interesting and vibrant of media, Cinema will be essential reading for students of anthropology and film.
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Moulding the Female Body in Victorian Fairy Tales and Sensation Novels

Author: Dr Laurence Talairach-Vielmas

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1409489825

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 198

View: 6572

Laurence Talairach-Vielmas explores Victorian representations of femininity in narratives that depart from mainstream realism, from fairy tales by George MacDonald, Lewis Carroll, Christina Rossetti, Juliana Horatia Ewing, and Jean Ingelow, to sensation novels by Wilkie Collins, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Rhoda Broughton, and Charles Dickens. Feminine representation, Talairach-Vielmas argues, is actually presented in a hyper-realistic way in such anti-realistic genres as children's literature and sensation fiction. In fact, it is precisely the clash between fantasy and reality that enables the narratives to interrogate the real and re-create a new type of realism that exposes the normative constraints imposed to contain the female body. In her exploration of the female body and its representations, Talairach-Vielmas examines how Victorian fantasies and sensation novels deconstruct and reconstruct femininity; she focuses in particular on the links between the female characters and consumerism, and shows how these serve to illuminate the tensions underlying the representation of the Victorian ideal.
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The Consumption Reader

Author: David B. Clarke,Marcus A. Doel,Kate M. L. Housiaux

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415213776

Category: Science

Page: 288

View: 3884

This reader offers an essential selection of the best work on the Consumer Society. It brings together in an engaging, surprising, and thought provoking way, a diverse range of topics and theoretical perspectives.
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The Essay Film

From Montaigne, After Marker

Author: Timothy Corrigan

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199910561

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 256

View: 5635

Why have certain kinds of documentary and non-narrative films emerged as the most interesting, exciting, and provocative movies made in the last twenty years? Ranging from the films of Ross McElwee (Bright Leaves) and Agn?s Varda (The Gleaners and I) to those of Abbas Kiarostami (Close Up) and Ari Folman (Waltz with Bashir), such films have intrigued viewers who at the same time have struggled to categorize them. Sometimes described as personal documentaries or diary films, these eclectic works are, rather, best understood as cinematic variations on the essay. So argues Tim Corrigan in this stimulating and necessary new book. Since Michel de Montaigne, essays have been seen as a lively literary category, and yet--despite the work of pioneers like Chris Marker--seldom discussed as a cinematic tradition. The Essay Film, offering a thoughtful account of the long rapport between literature and film as well as novel interpretations and theoretical models, provides the ideas that will change this.
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Fashion, Work, and Politics in Modern France

Author: S. Zdatny

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 140398445X

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 325

View: 7483

This history of coiffure in modern France illuminates a host of important twentieth-century issues: the course of fashion, the travails of small business in a modern economy, the complexities of labour reform, the failure of the Popular Front, the temptations of Pétainism, all accompanied by a parade of waves, chignons, and curls.
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The Crimes of Paris

A True Story of Murder, Theft, and Detection

Author: Dorothy Hoobler,Thomas Hoobler

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 0316052531

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 500

Turn-of-the-century Paris was the beating heart of a rapidly changing world. Painters, scientists, revolutionaries, poets--all were there. But so, too, were the shadows: Paris was a violent, criminal place, its sinister alleyways the haunts of Apache gangsters and its cafes the gathering places of murderous anarchists. In 1911, it fell victim to perhaps the greatest theft of all time--the taking of the Mona Lisa from the Louvre. Immediately, Alphonse Bertillon, a detective world-renowned for pioneering crime-scene investigation techniques, was called upon to solve the crime. And quickly the Paris police had a suspect: a young Spanish artist named Pablo Picasso....
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Afterlives: Allegories of Film and Mortality in Early Weimar Germany

Author: Steve Choe

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1441145206

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 272

View: 8364

Weimar cultural critics and intellectuals have repeatedly linked the dynamic movement of the cinema to discourses of life and animation. Correspondingly, recent film historians and theorists have taken up these discourses to theorize the moving image, both in analog and digital. But, many important issues are overlooked. Combining close readings of individual films with detailed interpretations of philosophical texts, all produced in Weimar Germany immediately following the Great War, Afterlives: Allegories of Film and Mortality in Early Weimar Germany shows how these films teach viewers about living and dying within a modern, mass mediated context. Choe places relatively underanalyzed films such as F. W. Murnau's The Haunted Castle and Arthur Robison's Warning Shadows alongside Martin Heidegger's early seminars on phenomenology, Sigmund Freud's Reflections upon War and Death and Max Scheler's critique of ressentiment. It is the experience of war trauma that underpins these correspondences, and Choe foregrounds life and death in the films by highlighting how they allegorize this opposition through the thematics of animation and stasis.
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Literature and Photography in Transition, 1850-1915

Author: O. Clayton

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137471506

Category: Fiction

Page: 233

View: 4277

Literature and Photography in Transition, 1850-1915 examines how British and American writers used early photography and film as illustrations and metaphors. It concentrates on five figures in particular: Henry Mayhew, Robert Louis Stevenson, Amy Levy, William Dean Howells, and Jack London.
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