China Reporting

An Oral History of American Journalism in the 1930's and 1940's

Author: Stephen R. MacKinnon,Oris Friesen

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520069671

Category: History

Page: 200

View: 1551

American journalists who covered China during the thirties and forties discuss how they pooled information, evaluated sources, and avoided bias
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American Journalism

History, Principles, Practices

Author: W. David Sloan,Lisa Mullikin Parcell

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9780786413713

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 384

View: 6137

Essays discuss the history and practices of American journalism, covering such topics as ethics, sensationalism, women in journalism, and new technologies.
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American Editor in Early Revolutionary China

John William Powell and the China Weekly/Monthly Review

Author: Neil O'Brien

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135945721

Category: History

Page: 332

View: 9028

This is a study of Sino-American relations and the editorial policy of the China Weekly Review / China Monthly Review , published in Shanghai by John William Powell during the Chinese Civil War and the Korean War. The Review supported US attempts in early 1946 to avert civil war through the creation of a coalition government. By 1947 it reflected growing disillusionment with Guomindang policies, and increasing sympathy for the demands of impoverished students and faculty for multi-party democracy and peace. As the Civil War shifted in favour of the Communists in late 1948, Powell and the Review counseled US businessmen to remain in Shanghai and urged the US government to establish working relations with the Communists, and later to recognize the new regime. Staying in Shanghai to report changes engendered by the Communist victory, the Review 's staff accomodated themselves to the new orthodoxy and to the regime's coordination of the press. During the Korean War, the Review opposed the expanding US air war, becoming the foremost American purveyor of Chinese and North Korean allegations of American use of bacteriological weapons. The Review was also utilized for the political indoctrination of US prisoners-of-war by the Chinese and North Koreans. After closing the Review in July 1953 and returning to the United States, Powell, his wife Sylvia Campbell and assistant editor Julian Schuman were put on trial for sedition. As the government narrowed its focus to the bacteriological warfare issue, Powell and his lawyers countered by trying to prove the veracity of the charges, seeking witnesses in China and North Korea. Adverse publicity led to a mistrial in January 1959 and limitations in both the sedition and treason statutes ended plans to renew prosecution. Powell and the Review had insisted that positive diplomatic and economic relations between China and the United States were both possible and desirable. The gradual normalization of trade, investment and political relations since the 1970s seemed to validate this belief. In the post-Cold War age when Sino-American relations are often strained and tempestuous, this book serves as a reminder of the value of making the extra effort to achiece understanding.
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The American Press and the Cold War

The Rise of Authoritarianism in South Korea, 1945–1954

Author: Oliver Elliott

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319760238

Category: History

Page: 254

View: 8014

During the Cold War, the United States enabled the rise of President Syngman Rhee’s repressive government in South Korea, and yet neither the American occupation nor Rhee’s growing authoritarianism ever became particularly controversial news stories in the United States. Could the press have done more to scrutinize American actions in Korea? Did journalists fail to act as an adequate check on American power? In the first archive-based account of how American journalism responded to one of the most significant stories in the history of American foreign relations, Oliver Elliott shows how a group of foreign correspondents, battling U.S. military authorities and pro-Rhee lobbyists, brought the issue of South Korean authoritarianism into the American political mainstream on the eve of the Korean War. However, when war came in June 1950, the press rapidly abandoned its scrutiny of South Korean democracy, marking a crucial moment of transition from the era of postwar idealism to the Cold War norm of American support for authoritarian allies.
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Chinese Characters

Profiles of Fast-changing Lives in a Fast-changing Land

Author: Angilee Shah,Jeffrey N. Wasserstrom

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520270274

Category: Social Science

Page: 231

View: 2274

Poignant, humorous and confusing stories of utterly ordinary people living through China's extraordinary transformations. The collection of essays creates a multifaceted portrait of a country in motion, and is an introduction to some of the best writing on China today.
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The Dissent Papers

The Voices of Diplomats in the Cold War and Beyond

Author: Hannah Gurman

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231530358

Category: Political Science

Page: 288

View: 6089

Beginning with the Cold War and concluding with the 2003 invasion of Iraq, Hannah Gurman explores the overlooked opposition of U.S. diplomats to American foreign policy in the latter half of the twentieth century. During America's reign as a dominant world power, U.S. presidents and senior foreign policy officials largely ignored or rejected their diplomats' reports, memos, and telegrams, especially when they challenged key policies relating to the Cold War, China, and the wars in Vietnam and Iraq. The Dissent Papers recovers these diplomats' invaluable perspective and their commitment to the transformative power of diplomatic writing. Gurman showcases the work of diplomats whose opposition enjoyed some success. George Kennan, John Stewart Service, John Paton Davies, George Ball, and John Brady Kiesling all caught the attention of sitting presidents and policymakers, achieving temporary triumphs yet ultimately failing to change the status quo. Gurman follows the circulation of documents within the State Department, the National Security Council, the C.I.A., and the military, and she details the rationale behind "The Dissent Channel," instituted by the State Department in the 1970s, to both encourage and contain dissent. Advancing an alternative narrative of modern U.S. history, she connects the erosion of the diplomatic establishment and the weakening of the diplomatic writing tradition to larger political and ideological trends while, at the same time, foreshadowing the resurgent significance of diplomatic writing in the age of Wikileaks.
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China images in the life and times of Henry Luce

Author: Patricia Neils

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 326

View: 9754

In the first book devoted exclusively to publisher Henry Luce and China, Patricia Neils provides a major reassessment of the Time Inc. mogul's views and his influence on American public opinion and foreign policy. Previous biographers and historians have depicted Luce as a fanatical anticommunist who used his pre-television media empire-the pages of Time, Life, and Fortune, radio broadcasts on March of Time, and Time Newsreels shown in theatres throughout the United States-to sway American opinion against Mao Tse Tung and Chinese communists in favor of the fascist regime of Chiang Kaishek. 1895-1925: Origins of China Images in the Life of Henry R. Luce; 1926-1936 Heroes and Bandits; 1937-1941: The Red Star and the Good Earth; 1942-1943: Our Honored Ally; 1944: The Stilwell Crisis; 1945-1946: The Vigil of a Nation; 1947-1948: Too Little, Too Late; 'Ghosts on the Roof' and Other Political Fairy Tales; 1950s: Leaning to One Side; Since 1965: The Trans-Pacific Dialogue; Bibliography; Index.
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Wuhan, 1938

War, Refugees, and the Making of Modern China

Author: Stephen R. MacKinnon

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520934601

Category: History

Page: 204

View: 5317

During the spring of 1938, a flood of Chinese refugees displaced by the Anti-Japanese War (1937-1945) converged on the central Yangzi valley tricity complex of Wuhan. For ten remarkable months, in a highly charged atmosphere of carnage, heroism, and desperation, Wuhan held out against the Japanese in what would become a turning point in the war—and one that attracted international attention. Stephen MacKinnon for the first time tells the full story of Wuhan's defense and fall, and how the siege's aftermath led to new directions in the history of modern Chinese culture, society, and politics.
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American Journalism

The Publication of the American Journalism Historians Association

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Journalism

Page: N.A

View: 9305

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America, history and life

Author: American Bibliographical Center,EBSCO Publishing (Firm)

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: United States

Page: N.A

View: 3280

Provides historical coverage of the United States and Canada from prehistory to the present. Includes information abstracted from over 2,000 journals published worldwide.
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China at War

Regions of China, 1937-1945

Author: Stephen R. MacKinnon

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9780804755092

Category: History

Page: 380

View: 9047

This book describes, in vivid detail, the history of the Japanese invasion and occupation and of different parts of China, from the viewpoints of scholars in China, Japan, and the West
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Japan as number one

lessons for America

Author: Ezra F. Vogel

Publisher: Harvard Univ Pr

ISBN: N.A

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 272

View: 7900

A chronicle of Japan's development into one of the world's most effective industrial powers.
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Nieman Reports

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Journalism

Page: N.A

View: 3216

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Krieg der Welten

Author: H.G. Wells

Publisher: Diogenes Verlag AG

ISBN: 3257609264

Category: Fiction

Page: 352

View: 3214

H. G. Wells schuf 1898 mit dem ›Krieg der Welten‹ den ersten Roman einer interplanetarischen Invasion, der das Vorbild zahlloser Marsmenschen-Märchen wurde. Orson Welles produzierte 1938 nach diesem SF-Klassiker das berühmteste Hörspiel aller Zeiten: obwohl als Hörspiel angekündigt, brach Panik aus, die Menschen verließen fluchtartig die Städte, weinten, beteten und glaubten an das Ende der Welt.
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